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Full text of "73 Magazine (June 1978)"

lune 1978 S2.00 




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30 Happiness Is Being A Ham Manufacturer 

— 73visitsCu5hcfah, , W2NSD/1 

34 Extended Double Zepp 

—old-timer's delight still works W6TYH 

38 New Dtpole Feeder 

^tuned feeders, vet? . , . AA4AX 

40 The Cliff-Dweller's Delight 

—how to operate from an apartment . WA2UVC 

42 Wait Till You Try 16 Elements! 

— 15 dB gain on 2m is a real kick WABFCA 

46 Working 15m With A 20m Beam 

— by adding three more elements W8ZCQ 

50 A Better Feedthrough For Cables 

—the $2 solution WABFCA 

52 Resurrecting The Beverage Antenna 

—try this 55-yeaf old, low-noise, low band 
antenna. . . .....,....,.*,,,,.,,,.. WSUSM 

56 How To Hang A Longwire 

— wirhoot a catastrophe , . W5CN 

60 The "German'' Quad 

—six bands with one antenna, .... WD4CPK/DF3TJ 

62 Mobile In Disguise 

—the invisible 3/8A 2m antenna .... K9MLD 

64 Better Than A Quad? 

— tryadeltaioop WA4NWW 

66 The Perverted Double Vee Antenna 

—double youf pleasure from 40m through 
10m ,.,,.,,, W5VSR 

72 Creeping Crud Got Your Signal? 

— poHution is stowly destroying your 

system K4TW| 

74 Towering Low Band Antennas 

— berserk mathematician figures 
impedance--. K30QF 

76 The SO Meter Pile Crusher 

— the ultimate verttcal? W20ZH 

82 Phased Verticals For Easy DX 

-and under $20! WIZYILAfBP 

84 Modernize The Matchbox 

— increased capability for a classic 

coupler . W8F3t/4 

86 The Miserly Magnetic Antenna 

—make this sausage-can magnetic 

mount W2AZD 



88 



92 



96 



100 



108 



111 



N4VD 



WA4FVZ 



W2Lf| 



EaiMt 



114 



118 



122 



134 



136 



140 



146 



154 



158 



160 



166 



170 



174 



The 75m DX Chaser Antenna 

— the 5/flAj'workson 75m as well as 2m ... 

The Invisible Allband Antenna 

-works DX, too .►,...*.. 

Who Says Verticals Don't Work? 

—the four-band phased- vertical bomber , 
j^ Low-Cost Keyboard --II 

— software jfor the April keyboard . . . 

21 Computerized Loop Antenna Design 

-in BASIC. ... . . . WB2IPD 

jj Hey! Watt For MeJ 

— slowing computers to reading 

speed .......................:., WA3MWM 

Tg Morrow's Marvelous Monitor 

-reviewing the Morrow front panel , , . . . Eigsti 

Enjoy All Bands With A Remote Tuner 

^motorized marvel . KL7AE 

New Use For CB Antennas 

-converting 'em for ham use WA2KBZiJY9KS 

Confessions Of A Vertical Fanatic 

— careful, he's looking for converts ICH6HDM 

Novice Guide To Phased Antennas 

-part I ,.. WaHXR 

The 21-Element Brown Bomber 

— 2m beam with sadisttcally strong signal . _ W9CG1 

The Towerless "Tower" 

— new grounded-rotor design , SC4FK^N40G 

The Two Hour, Two Meter Beam 

^simple five-element loop yagi . . . WB9TNW 

Now Try 1296 MHz 

— simple discone antenna WA4WDL WB4LfM 

The OSCAR Boppers 

— turnstile antennas for 145 MHz and 432 

MHz G3ZCZ/W3 

Cushcraft Does It Again! 

— their new tribander is a winner ....... KIOPQ 

The S-Meter Bender 

—W7DND's magic antenna . W8HXR 

Amazingly Simple Log Periodic Antenna 

— an a-lb. mini LPfor20m ., .... K1QAR 

Disguised Birdhouse Vertical 

—give the birds a hot foot wtth this secret 
antenna ....... ...,,.. K5LUW 



Never Say Die-- 4. Letters-* 12, Contests— 14. New Products- 1«, Looking West-20, RUy Loop-22, AMSAT~24. Ham 
Help-24. FCC-2S, Ham Hetp-2S« Social Events-26, Ham Help-26, Ham Help-1d8, Oscar Orbits-1sa, Ham Help-191, 
Corrections— 191f Propagation— 22S i 



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NAIVE IDEAS 

It's been a long time since 
I've editorialized about my 
naive and idealistic ideas of 
what amateur radio should be 
like. Come wttii me to dream 
world. 

We have several difficulties 
with amateur radio, and most 
of them stem from lousy rules 
and a lack of enforcement by 
the FCC, i get a bit frustrated 
when I see petitions being fed 
into the FCC hopper every time 
some amateur or club gels pro- 
voked by something that has 
happened. The first Knee^jerk 
reaction is to demand a law 
against the bad thing. 

We have TVI? Pass a law 
against it. We have jamming of 
nets? Pass a law. We have 
crowded bands? Pass a law. 
Fiddlesticks and bah humbug* 

Any person who takes any 
kind of objective look at the use 
of laws to solve problems has 
to come to the conclusion that 
this is one of the worst ways to 
try and make things better. And 
this holds true In spades when 
ft comes to the FCC. It takes 
them years to act on a pro- 
posaL In ten times out of nine, 
the problem is long gone by the 
time the rule comes out, and 
when it does emerge, it creates 
a whole new bunch of problems 
never envisioned by the idiots 
who demanded the lavtf in the 
first place. 

Since the bulk of our rule 
changes have been the result 
of the ARRL demanding them, I 
point my finger toward New- 
ington as the source of much of 
our miseries. Yes, I know, there 
goes Wayne, trying to get more 
circulation by heapmg abuse 
on the poor underpaid head- 
quarters gang . . . ad beloved by 
hundreds of thousands of loyal 
members. 

Let's not rake over old coals 
the incredibly stupid rules 
we have had to endure at 
various times. One of these 
days I'll write at length for 
newcomers to acquaint them 
with some of the blundering 
history o1 amateur radio 
legislation. They won't believe 



BDiTOfttAL BY WA YNB GfiiEN 
It 

The entry into amateur radio 
has been made painful by three 
thif^gs — the code exam, the 
theory exam, and the FCC ad- 
ministration of these exams. 
Few amateurs have been 
through a painless FCC exam 
. . - rt is a trauma for almost 
everyone, I don't think this is 
necessary, I wouid prefer to set 
up a whole new system, one 
which is not alt that far from 
where we are right now. 

A few years ago, I made a 
survey of the ham cfubs to find 
out which were running train- 
ing classes for newcomers. At 
that time, there were a max- 
imum of 50 clubs with such 
classes In the country. I set 
about getting clubs to run 
classes by writing editorials 
and providing the best training 
aids which had ever been 
deve!of>ed for making it easy 
for beginners— the 73 study 
guides and tapes. Today there 
are over 2000 ham clubs giving 
classes, and amateur radio is 
growing as never before. 

The next step I'd like to see is 
the turning over of the licensing 
exams to clubs. We had prob* 
lems with our Conditional class 
of ham license because it was 
set up with only one examiner. 
rd like to see the clubs ad- 
minister the license exams 
with a minimum of three li- 
censed ham proctors present. 
You can have funny business 
with one chap, perhaps even 
with two, but with three in on It, 
there is too much likelihood for 
someone to spill the beans. I 
suggest that where someone 
blows the whistle and there is a 
good likelihood of mischief, the 
club should lose its licensing 
authority. 

The club handling of license 
exams would not only take a lot 
of the pressure off those taking 
the tests, but it would also 
make it far less expensive for 
newcomers since they would 
not have to miss a day's work 
and drive to a city to take the 
exams. And think of what this 
would save the FCC in ad* 
ministration costs! 



7S Magazine ts pubiishet^ month fy by 73, !np., Feterdofough NH 03458. 
Subscnption rates in the U.S. and Canada are $15 for one year, $26 for two 
years, and $36 for three years. Outside the U.S. and Canada, write for 
ratea. Second ctass postage paid at Peterborough NH 03458 and af addi- 
iionai m ailing offices. Publication No. 700420, Phone: 603924-3873, En- 
tire contents copyright 1973 by 73, inc. iNCLUDE OLD ADDRESS AND ZtP 
CODE WtlH ADDRESS CHANGE NOriFiCATiON. WcrofUm edh 
fion— University Microfltm, Ann Arbor Mi 43106. 



Okay for step one. Now, 
about our subbands. In this 
case, Vd like to see Ihe FCC 
open all ham bands for any 
emission and let us draw up our 
own uses for the bands. It 
would be chaos, right? 

I doubt it* We have gone 
through just such situations in 
the past* all without FCC rules, 
and we have come through 
©very time with honor. One of 
the more recent major changes 
was from AM to SSB on the low 
bands. The two modes were not 
compatible, so there were often 
skirmishes between them. But, 
eariy in the game, a detente 
was achieved where the SSB 
gang started from the top of the 
20m phone band and the AM 
from the bottom, thus keeping 
relatively out of each other's 
hair. It worked. 

We called it a gentlemen's 
agreement. Sure, we had some 
hams who most definitely were 
not gentlemen. None of us who 
heard W20Y were inclined to 
think of him as a gentleman. 
But the good guys won out over 
the bad guys and eventually 
SSB took over because it was 
better. 

We had a similar problem 
when repeaters started up. 
There were repeater wars at 
first and screams tor the FCC 
to do something. By the time 
the FCC got something done, 
the repealer groups had orga- 
nized into repeater councils, 
set up frequency coordinating 
committees, and had every- 
thing well in hand. Then the 
FCC used a sledgehammer to 
kill the fly. We are still getting 
out from under the mess the 
FCC made of that one . , . with 
the great help of the ARRL 

To facilitate the setting up of 
gentlemen's agreements, I sug- 
gest we have the Interested 
ham clubs send represen- 
tatives— two each— to a na- 
tional ham conference, prob- 
ably every two years. Funding 
this pilgrimage and the running 
of ham classes would be major 
functions of clubs. 

The conference would break 
up into working groups to study 
proposed changes in band 
usage, bringing their com- 
mittee reports to the whole 
body for a vote. The clubs 
would then see that these new 
agreements were observed by 
hams in their area» club 
members or not, using peer 
pressure to get compliance. 

Would this mean that small 
groups interested in special- 
ized modes would get the 
shaft? Not likely, for we have 
seen in ©very case that the 
repeater councils have really 
over-protected special in- 
terests. When setting up 
repeater channels, they leave 
more frequency space for CW, 
SSB, RTTY, and other groups 
than is really needed. Hams are 



_<^. 



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fair people and in groups they 
are usually able to overcome 
selMnterest and be helpful and 
considerate of others. I think 
that we might see a generation 
of experimentation and pto* 
neering far beyond anything we 
have ever seen before if such a 
scheme could be implemented. 

The number of anarchists in 
our midst is small and i think 
we can handle them. 1 think we 
can do it much better than we 
have so far because the nor- 
mal response to a problem at 
present is to call the FCC for 
help instead of doing it 
ourselves. Was it really 
necessary to arrest and im- 
prison the two hams in New 
Orleans who, for a lark, spent 
almost a year driving the 
repeater users bananas with 
foul language and in- 
terference? Wouldn't the 
shame of exposure to the club 
members and other local hams 
have been enough to solve the 
problem? 

The FCC says it doesn't have 
enough money to do this, to do 
that, and I say we can do 
everything they are doing for us 
and a lot more, all at no ex- 
pense to them whatever. For a 
couple of bucks a license, we 
could hire a commercial firm to 
set up a Gomputef and issue 
ham tickets, with a copy to the 
FCC for their files. That way we 
could have special station 
calls, repeater calls, and 
anything else we felt like 
having and agreed among 
ourselves we needed. Special 
licenses cost more to process, 
so we charge more. Big deal A 
$100 repeater license would be 
well worth the cost to most 
clubs ... It would be a badge of 
pride. And $100 for a special 
call for a fair or big event would 
be peanuts. 

Convinced? 

Then start petitioning the 
FCC for the changes, and who 
knows, by the time our children 
are asking us to come babysit 
their kids, we might have some 
better rules. That is, providing 
there is any ham radio by then. 

A NEW PROSPECT FOR 
SURVIVAL 

Could the United States con- 
tinue telecommunications on 
an international basis if it 
withdrew from the Interna- 
tional Telecommunications 
Union? There would be massive 
problems, but it is possible that 
the U.S. could go its own way. 
This could destroy the ITU, so 
the prospect Is not a happy 
one. 

Yet that is what seems to be 
seriously under consideration 
as the U.S. heads into the 
WARC conferences at the ITU 
in 1979. Many of the other ser- 
vices are as concerned as 
amateurs over the possible 
losses of frequencies, and 



rightly so. 

The present shortwave allo- 
cations were set up primarily at 
an ITU conference in Atlantic 
City In 1947. At that time, few 
countries had any extensive 
use for the shortwaves, so the 
major European countries and 
the U.S. grabbed the lion's 
share of them. This was okay 
for a while, but then the 
emerging nations found that 
they, too, had desperate needs 
for radio frequencies, few of 
which were available. By 1959, 
the major powers sensed that 
Ihey had a losing battle on their 
hands, so, by the skin of their 
teeth, they voted to put off 
shortwave reallocations until 
the next conference. This was 
supposed to come in 1969. 

When the African and Asian 
emerging nations took over 
control of the ITU in the early 
60s» the major powers still had 
enough clout to prevent the 
1969 conference. Small con- 
ferences in 1971 and 1973 on 
satellite frequency allocations 
and marine radio allocations 
made it clear that the new 
African countries had the ball, 
and these conferences were 
unmitigated disasters for the 
big countries. The small coun- 
tries were now powerful 
enough to force the shortwave 
conference for 1979 and the big 
powers had no further way to 
stop them. 

More and more f hear people 
whom I respect saying the un- 
sayabie— that the U.S, may 
well pull out of the ITU, that the 
one nation, one vote concept is 
no longer possible to accept. 
We've proven pretty well that 
this concept doesn't work with 
the UN. Why should a small 
African country with one ham (a 
white European visitor) and a 
need for maybe three broad- 
cast radio channels have an 
equal vote with the U.S.? One 
reason is that no one has been 
able to come up with a better 
solution to the need for inter- 
national agreements. If the U.S, 
had 10,000 votes and the 
African country one, why 
should the African country 
bother to come? 

The U.S. worked out a solu- 
tion to this same situation 
when It was formed. They set 
up rwo groups of represen- 
tatives, one representing the 
political areas (the Senate) and 
one representing the propor- 
tions of the population (the 
House), Perhaps If the UN and 
its subbranch, the ITU, were 
rebuilt as a world democracy, 
the system could be made to 
work. 

tf the U.S. and severaf other 
major powers puM out of the ITU 
(say, does that mean we would 
have to pull out of the UN 
also?), it could bring this to a 
head* 



WARC AN DOB 

One of the information 

bulletins being circulated to 
those participating In WARC 
discusses the hate between CB 
and amateur radio in Great Bri- 
tain and cites as one of the 
primary causes several articles 
in QST. * 'Mat tors were not 
helped by the American 
amateur magazine 'QST,' 
which is read by many English 
amateurs, printing several of 
the most antl-CB news stories 
that it could find each mor^th." 

SWISS WARC 
RECOMMENDATIONS 

The Swiss group has recom- 
mended that the amateur 
430-432 and 438-440 MHz bands 
be replaced with a mobile ser- 
vice. They also want to make 
41-68 MHz into a mobile band 
(not amateur), as they do 
174-235 MHz (whoops, there 
goes 2201). 

BRITISH WABC PROPOSALS 

Britain wants to double all 
shortwave broadcasting bands 
below 20 MHz; they also want 
an additional broadcasting 
band between 12-15 MHz (how 
about 14 MHz, fellas?). 
Amateurs should, they feel, be 
"relocated" from the 7.1-7.3 
MHz band, but no suggestions 
are made tor another home. 
They also propose a cut in the 
220 MHz band, removing 
220*223 MHz from amateur ser- 
vice. 

THANKS TO MICHIGAN 

The Idea for the petition 

which ran in the February issue 
of IS came from a group in 
Michigan who sent in such a 
petition to me, I dropped them a 
line thanking them for the idea 
and put it quickly into motion. 
The response to the petition 
has been gratifying, as i\e 
mentioned. The stack of peti- 
tions is now almost a foot high, 
perhaps welt over a thousand 
of them, most with five to fifty 
names. 

Solidarity like this impresses 
even the obviously biased FCC 
Commissioners. I sure wish 
that I had had this pile of peti- 
tions when the oral hearing on 
amplifiers was held last 
November , . the Commis- 
sioners might have listened to 
the amateur arguments a little 
more closely* 

Cooper Is still hard at work, 
though his life is complicated 
by the need lo dodge a Califor- 
nia court which charges fraud. 
Cooper is a wily chap and so far 
has been one step ahead of the 
pack at every turn, 

WHY PETITIONS WORK 

A letter from WA2RNG 
groused about my wasting 

space in 73 for a petition— after 
all, they don't work , , , 
everyone knows that. 



Oh yeah? 

Vm not putting RNG down, 
for 1 used to think that petitions 
were a waste of time and effort. 
That was before 1 did any 
groundwork in Washington, the 
place where politics is king. It 
didn't take long nosing around 
Washington, seeing how our 
government works, to discover 
that there is magic in a pile of 
petitions. Those names mean 
people and people mean votes, 
and votes mean congressional 
interest and enthusiasm, and 
that means action . . . and 
that's a fact. 

The FCC, like any other arm 
of our government, is sensitive 
and responsive to political 
pressures, so they do perk up 
when someone comes in and 
lays a pile of petitions In front 
of them. They start hearing 
more clearly. If ARRL counsel 
Booth had laid a pile of peti- 
tions on the desks of the Com- 
missioners instead of an 
endless monologue, we might 
stilt be able to buy ham 
amplifiers with a 10m band on 
them. 

When we testified on the 
need for repeater rule changes 
In 1974, we laid a big pUe of 
petitions on the Commis- 
sioners' desks and we got just 
about every rule change we 
asked for. Sure, it took months 
to get those petitions signed. 
We spent a targe part of the 73 
booth space and personnel at 
hamfests and conventions on 
getting petitions signed during 
1973, and we put on an ex- 
cellent presentation. The 
package did the job. 

STOP COOPER 

In addition to several thou^ 
sand signatures on our peti- 
tions from hams and thetr 
friends, quite a bunch have 
been coming in from CBers, 
Surprised? Typical is a letter 
from Don Sweat of Crystal 
Springs REACT In San Mateo, 
California. He says that he and 
the 30 members of the REACT 
team are studying for their ham 
tickets and they are going all 
out to stop Cooper. 

The biggest bunch of signa- 
tures received so far was sent 
in by Harold Wallich WONAZ of 
Missourl^ — 330 signatures! 
Congratulations for the hard 
work, Harold . . . those peti- 
tions are an Impressive sight. 

LEAGUE BLACKMAILS 
BEGINNERS 

When I say the League, I am 
referring only to HQ in New- 

inglon, not the thousands of 
members, and there is a very 
distinct difference. The 
members are not consulted by 
HQ on anything (when was the 
last poll you've seen in OST 
asking your opinion?), so 
members should not feel defen- 
sive aboul things over which 




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they have absolutely no con- 
tfoL 

So what about all this 
blackmail business? I am In 
possession of a letter from C.J- 
Harris WB2CH0. the Clubs and 
Training Manager of ARRL, ad- 
dressed to club instructors. In 
this letter C.J. says, **We are 
changing our former procedure 
of sending out large quantities 
of Operating Aids with this 
package {FCC 610 forms). In- 
stead, your students will 
receive these operating aids 
when they sign and return the 
enclosed petition in support of 
the eftorl to expand the Novice 

80 meter band " 
Now, fellow ARRL member, 

and I've been a member of the 
League for 40 years now, have I 
exaggerated in any way when I 
call that blackmail? When the 
FCC peopte find that the 
League is forcing hams to sign 
a petition in exchange for 
goodies, what possible value 
do you think they will put on 
names gotten through such 
bribery and coercion? I wonder 
if anyone at the League 
thought this through and real- 
ized that by forcrng people to 
sign a petition, they will effec- 
tivefy shoot down their Novice 
band expansion scheme. Or did 
they do this on purpose so it 
would merely look as if they 
were behind the band 
changes? 

If you consider the above as 
anti-ARRL, what would you 
suggest as my response to the 
League letter to clubs? Would 
you, if you were editing 73, just 
keep quiet about it? Do you feel 
that amateurs do not have a 
right to know what the League 
is doing? 

Yes, I know that there are a 
few amateurs who are so pro- 
ARRL that they want every bad 
thing that goes on at the 
League to be kept secret. They 
feel that even the slightest 
critical mention of the ARRL is 
a personal attack on them. 
When some fellow amateur 
tries to get them to look at 
facts, they just get mad. 
Believe me, it takes great 
courage or great stupidity (your 
choice) to dare to say anything 
critical about the League, no 
matter how constructive the 
criticism. There are no rewards 
for those who speak out. 

And now the good news: The 
percentage of hams who react 
emotionally at any critical men- 
tion of the League is small to* 
day. Today the majority of 
amateurs try to be realistic 
about the ARRL. They are 
frustrated by some of the 
things the League is doing or 
not doing, but they don't know 
what to do about iL They find it 
difficult to try and come up with 
ideas at club meetings be- 
cause there are still a lot of 
"loyal" League members, with 
"loyal" meaning think no evil, 



permit no evil to be spoken, etc. 
tt is a lot easier to blindly 
beJieve in the League than to 
live with the knowledge that we 
are essentially unprotected 
and at the mercy of forces over 
which we have little control, 

MORE DECEPTION? 

Speaking of C.J. Harris of the 
ARRL, you might, for laughs, 
check out the March-April issue 
of Bfementary Electronics, In 
there youll find a nice article 
on getting started in amateur 
radio, which is all well and 
good. However, the article is 
one long sales pitch for ARRL 
products, including their terri- 
ble code course, and no men- 
tion whatever of Harris being 
employed by the ARRL. Shame 
on Elementary Etectronias and 
the ARRL for this deception. 

The fact is that I was flipping 
through the magazine and 
spied the article. Since any ob- 
jective evaluation of code 
courses would list the 73 tapes 
first, I looked for the reference 
. . , none! Hmmm . . . only the 
ARRL was pushed , . , hmmm 
some more. Then I looked at the 
author of the article and 
discovered that the manufac- 
turer (ARRL) had written the ar- 
ticle to sell the product. I 
wonder If 1 should start writing 
articles for other magazines 
telling newcomers how great 
the 73 cassettes are? 

HAMS ARE NOT 
EXPERIMENTING 

One of the club newsletters 
recently had quite a long 
diatribe on how most hams are 
not participating in pioneering 
efforts. This is true , . . guilty, 
but with an explanation. 

We would have a lot more 
breakthroughs in communica- 
tions techniques by amateurs if 
the FCC did not interfere at 
every turn . . J think that ts ob- 
vious, By dampening the 
climate for experimentation 
and pioneering, the FCC has 
thrown a pall over the entire 
amateur radio community. 
Pioneering is a work of en- 
thusiasm , , . it is fun. When 
you have a bureaucracy sitting 
on top of you, W is difficult to 
have fun, Not many amateurs 
want to fight the FCC, nor do 
they want to have to conduct 
their experiments clandestine- 
ly. The end result is little in the 
way of progress as compared 
to what we could have if we 
were free of the deadening FCC 
yoke. 

If amateurs were encouraged 
to experiment, we would find 
more and more articles in 73 on 
these ideas, and these in turn 
would spark more enthusiasm 
and tdeas. Enthusiasm builds 
more enthusiasm just as gloom 
develops more gloom. 

No, I think it is useless to 
castigate amateurs for not 
pioneering or to try and force 



them to do things on the basis 
of shame. Amateurs will work 
best if they are having fun and 
can brag a lot . . . then they 
spread thek contagious en- 
thusiasm. You'll get a thousand 
times the end result from an ar- 
ticle on some new invention 
that is fun than you will from an 
article casting shame on those 
who are not experimenting. 

Ham radio is a hobby, it is for 
fun. When it ceases to t>e fun, it 
will go away. We saw clearly 
what happened in t963 when 
'Incentive licensing*' pro- 
posals by the League took the 
fun out of hamming— tens of 
thousands of amateurs went 
off the air and dropped out . . . 
permanently. The growth of the 
hobby stopped, invention just 
about stopped, and sales of 
ham gear dropped to about 
one-seventh what they had 
been, driving over 600 ham 
stores out of business and do- 
ing in all of the large manufac- 
turers. 

HAM PIONEERING 

For as long as I can 
remember (and unfortunately I 
can rememt>er a very long lime), 
the FCC has been doing just 
about all it could to violate one 
of its most important rules- 
Part 97,1c, the one and only 
regulation which specifically 
outlines the responsibilities of 
the FCC. This regulation says 
the FCC shall follow the princi- 
pie of: ''Encouragement and 
improvement of the amateur 
service through rules which 
provide for advancing skills in 
both the communication and 
technical phases of the art/' 

When the FCC denies ama- 
teur requests for special tem- 
porary authority (ST A) to experi* 
ment with new techniques and 
ideas, and does this on a con- 
tinuing basis, then they are 
clearly in violation of their own 
rules. 

Am 1 making a big thing out 
of nothing? Here is where my 
long memory comes into play. I 
remember al[ too clearly the 
years of pressure it took for 
amateurs to fight both the FCC 
and the ARRL to get RTTY per- 
mitted on the low bands. In the 
early days, the FCC forced 
repeaters to close down and it 
took years to get them ac- 
cepted by the FCC. 

Many technical develop- 
ments have been stopped cold 
because the FCC insisted that 
amateurs not transmit any type 
of signals their monitoring sta- 
tions couldn't copy. How can 
you pioneer anything under 
that restriction? You can"t! 

The FCC is still at it, and if 
you doubt that, just ask any 
amateur who has requested an 
STA for testing ASCII on the 
ham bands. There is no known 
reason why amateurs should 
not be permitted to go ahead 
and use ASCII and start their 



development of systems using 
this modem technique. How 
can amateurs provide leader- 
to industry if they are 



hamstrung {pardon} at every 
turn by the FCC ... in violation 
of their own regulations? 

20 KHZ SPLIT PIONEERED 

There are growing rumors of 
an attempt to change the 
historic 30 kHz two meter 
repeater channel split to 20 
kHz. Since nobody asked my 
opinion of this, 1 feel free to 
comment. 

Shades of eight years ago! 
There was a strong movement 
way back in the early days of 
repeaters to change to 20 kHz 
splits. Come to think of it, the 
chap who was at the heart of 
this movement then is, oddly 
enough, now living where the 
new thrust is taking place. Is 
this a coincidence? 

To recap history briefly: The 
first repeater channels were set 
up on 60 kHz splits. This was in 
the early 60s and most hams 
were using hand-me*down 
police and taxi units set up for 
wideband (30 kHz) operation. 
Narrowband rules for the land 
mobile services had obsoleted 
a lot of FM equipment, which 
promptly fell into ham hands at 
a fraction of its previous cost. 
The wideband channels dic- 
tated the 60 kHz splits between 
repeaters. 

Once the 60 kHz channels 
filled up* the pressure in- 
creased to shift to narrowband 
FM, a mode which, by the way, 
was pioneered by a ham back in 
the late 40s. As FMers nar- 
rowed their rigs down, tt was 
possible to sandwich In more 
repeaters on the 30 kHz 
^^splits." 

In 1969, we brought things to 
a head by packing 73 with FM 
and repeater articles, running a 
series of FM symposiums 
around the country; and putting 
out an FM Repeater Newslet- 
ter. This helped get the country 
organized into using a common 
set of channels. Before this, on- 
ly a handful of repeaters were 
set up on the now standard 600 
kHz spacing, thus making the 
use of crystal-controlled rigs a 
problem* Along In 1970-71, the 
pressures forced repeater 
groups to get together and 
swap channels so they could 
move to 6D0 kHz spacing. With 
few exceptions, this is now the 
rule. 

When all of the 146 MHz 
repeater channels in New York 
rilled up (147 MHz was at that 
lime only open to General class 
and above), the first of the 15 
kHz "splinter" channels was 
tried. It worked, after a fashion, 
for some users. It became 
quickly apparent that either the 
state of the art of making two 
meter FM receivers was going 
to have to progress or else 15 



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HAMdASSADORS 



Your October, 1977, editorial 
comment posed the appro- 
priate question, "Can the 
QCWA save amateur radio?" 
This timely Inquiry has stucft In 
my craw ever since, and my 
curiosity has been building 
steadfiy. It's about time I wrote 
to see if anyone "answered the 
call" 

Well? Haven't there been any 
encouraging results so far [see 
page 35 of the April, 1978, issue 
of 73, column 1)? If there have 
been, they haven't been re* 
ported to us. Vd tike to thinl< 
that we can trust the QCWA to 
bear the full burden of support- 
ing amateur radio by becoming 
"hambassadors" to developing 
countries (and leave it at that). 
But life has taught me not to 
count on anything — so I'd like 
to see what the average 
amateur can do to help. 

The idea of ham ambas- 
sadors ^'hambassadors' is the 
nickname I came up with) is 
great! It's a good idea to get 
them from the QCWA, the peo* 
pie whose knowledge of ama- 
teur radio is probably mora 
than sufficient to get the )ob 
done right. It's also nice that 
since many of the QCWA mem- 
bers travel a lot anyway as part 
of their jobs, there would be no 
cost to anyone for the great ser- 
vice they would provide to 
amateur radio. 

But— what can we **smafl 
fry" do? What can the average 
ham do to help keep amateur 
radio off the butcher's block at 
WARC 79? This is obviously a 
moot question (perhaps a good 
sybject for an upcoming edi* 
toriai?). The only thing that I can 
think of to help get the |ob done 
would be to provide the means 
by which any ''qualified'' 
amateur could become a **ham- 
bassador," Alter all, I would 
assume that not a// of the 
QCWA members have expense 
accounts and make regular 
business trips to foreign coun- 
tries. There may be many of 
these pioneers and Innovators 
who would be Itching to go and 
do something to benefit our 
hobby, but who don't have the 
means. Furthermore, there are 
probably those hams who are 
fully qualified to lake the 
responsibility who are not 
QCWA membe/s, and also lack 
the means to make this signifi- 



cant move to benefit our hobby. 
Anything we can do in the way 
of support would probably be 
much needed and greatly ap- 
preciated. 

My first suggestion Is to set 
up a fund from which "ham- 
bassadors" could draw to 
cover expenses incurred as a 
result of their "mission.*' Dona- 
tions would come from the 
"average" hams all over the 
U.S,, and money received would 
be controlled by a responsible 
administrator who would 
answer to a board or panel of 
trustees. These trustees would 
be responsible for determining 
who is or is not eligible for the 
job of ■*hambassador," and 
they would also act as coor- 
dinators, making sure each 
country is covered and follow- 
ing up on the results of each ex- 
pedition. 

My next suggestion is that 
whatever we do, let's do it fast! 
Let*s not waste a bunch of time 
debating about it and wrap our^ 
selves up in the politics of the 
thing. It's late in the game, and 
whatever any of us can do 
should be done immediately if 
we want to see amateur radio 
remain like it is Instead of 
become an all-VHF/UHF/X^ 
band affair! 

Let's pool our thoughts, 
come up with a plan, and put it 
into action before another six 
months slips through our 
fmgersl 

Timothy M. Mrva WD8QLB 

Elsie Ml 

Wefi, Timothy, the answer to 
your question is that I have not 
heard of anyone^ OCWA or 
other, netting out to contact 
those countries which wtff 
decide on our ham bands at 
Geneva next year. The smatt 
African countnes are the ones 
which wiif be abfe to vote 
whatever frequency alfocations 
they desire. With one vote per 
country and few, if any, friends 
in Africa^ how far do you think 
an "American" hobby is going 
to gel as far as i<eeping In- 
credibly valuable shortwave 
frequencies Is concerned? 
When we lost 237,240 MHz of 
previously affocated satellite 
ham frequencies at the ITU 
satellite conference in 1971, it 
was clear that the handwriting 
was on the wati That's right, 
we lost every single sateftite 
frequency we had allocated 
above 450 MHz at that con- 



ference . . that was a perma- 
nent toss. Then, when the same 
disaster fell on the maritime 
frequency users at the 1973 ITU 
conference, again brought 
about by the solid bloc voting 
of small African countries, it 
was even clearer. These short- 
wave frequencies are very 
valuable, whether for use by the 
country or for tease to other 
users (each channel is said to 
be worth about $70 million}. The 
likelihood of these African 
countries being kind enough to 
voluntarily give up something 
they can rent for cold, hard 
cash so a bunch of Americans 
can play is not something I care 
to bet aloton... remembering 
how popular the U,S. is with 
most African nations. 

As I said in the October 
editorial, / think that these 
countries could be encouraged 
to save the ham bands for hams 
if someone were to go and visit 
the heads of the countnes and 
acquaint them with the tremen- 
dous value amateur radio could 
have tor their countries . , , a 
fact not one of them Is familiar 
with, 

Hambassadors might swing 
the difference, if we had any. 
As far as collecting money for 
such an effort goes, there isn't 
time to do this through any 
general collection from ama- 
teurs . , , that takes much too 
long. With the ARRL keeping 
mum on the whole situation, 
most amateurs would seize 
upon this as an excuse to let 
someone else pay to try and 
save amateur radio. After alt, If 
there were any serious danger, 
the League would do some- 
thing about it ,,. right? 
Sure . . , just like they did about 
our satellite frequencies when 
they went to Geneva to repre- 
sent us and iost every single 
kifohertz we had above 450 
MHz— 237,240 megahertz lost 
. . . forever. 

The only other possibility is 
that the ham manufacturers 
may stop their political In- 
fighting and collect enough 
money to field some hambas* 
sadors. Right now some of the 
U.S. manufacturers seem to be 
more interested in battling 
Japanese ham importers than 
looking to next year at Geneva. 
The chaps running the import- 
ing firms are mostfy old-time 
U.S. hams, and seem to be 
alone in their desire to do 
something about the situation. 
Weird. 

If the ham industry were to 
Immediately Increase equip- 
ment prices by about 3%, they 
could gather about $250,000 a 
month from this **tax" and use 
it to get some hambassadors 
into the field right away. Most 
of us pay a lot more than that in 
sates taxes {except in New 
Hampshire, where we have no 
sales taxBsL This wav. all sc- 



tive hams could pay for the 
hambassador program. I've 
made this suggestion to the irh 
dustry and asked that the firms 
get together at Dayton and stop 
the infighting ,,. and try the 
5% hambassador funding con- 
cept. Wilt it happen? Read next 
month and rejoice or weep. 

Remember, I could be wrong 
about all this . . . but what if I 
am right?— Wayne. 



QRPp? 



1 



It's my belief that any ham 
using more than 20 Watts on 
the bands today would use a 
sledgehammer to kill flies. 

The fact is, there's not a 
country on this globe too 
remote to be accessible to a 
station running a half Watt and 
a dipole (under proper condi* 
tions, of course). Yet, our fre- 
quencies quake with shrieking 
thousand'Watters beam-boost- 
ed to erp levels of 104 times 
that amount. 

How come? Perhaps It's 
another manifestation of the 
same syndrome which, until 
recently, cluttered our 
highways with 500-HP. gas- 
guzzling behemoths. At any 
rate, the ad men behind this 
power tripping In hamdom 
surely deserve their due. Their 
campaign may go down as one 
of the most successful decep- 
tions of an intelligent group of 
individualists ever perpetrated. 
Happily, though, it looks like 
"megawatt mania" has nearly 
run its course* 

It used to be that the guy on 
the other end of the QSO came 
right out and told you that he 
had a gallon, a California kW, or 
a legal limit and then some. But 
things have changed. Notice 
how often now you hear, "rig 
here 900 Watts." Come on, 
fellas, even the most mathe* 
matically inept of our ranks 
recognize that as pretty darn 
close to the big K. But It does 
show where It's all headed. 

The tide Is turning to low 
power. But there will be the 
diehards, those few who may 
never fully appreciate just how 
boorish it is to plop down a big 
fat U.S. double gallon on a 
choice frequency during a DX 
contest and start calling, "CQ 
test*' It simply salves one W's 
ego while forcing many foreign 
stations into the background 
instead of allowing them to effi- 
ciently work the hordes of other 
American hams anxiously waft- 
ing for a QSO. But then, I sup^ 
pose the DX understands 
. . . after all, the specter of the 
ygly American Is nothing new. 

Once you experience the 
warm respect you receive from 
DX stations when they learn 
you're running QRPp, you 



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Do you somBtimes get a fittle 
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They may not actually talk 
business, but you know the call 
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The beauty of these chan- 
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Looking M/fest 



Bflt Pasternak WABlTf 
24SS4-C NewhaU Am. 
Newhatf CA 3U2J 

\ hope I am mistaken* I really 
hope that the FCC knov^s what 
it's doing, but I have a feeling 
that this time they are wrong. 
I'm speaking about the an- 
nouncement of March 23, 1978, 
that totally deregulated re- 
peaters and deatt a death blow 
to special repeater caklsigns. I 
hope that the FCC has not also 
dealt a death blow to voluntary 
coordination and thereby ne- 
gated the many years of work 
done by great numbers of 
dedicated amateurs. I know 
some of you are going to say 
that IIP is playing the part of a 
pessimist, but the fact Is that 
by the time you read this there 
will be only two criteria neces* 
sary to put a repeater on the air: 
a Technician class or higher 
license and a checkbook. Not 
so long ago, It took technical 
expertise, a desire to advance 
the state of the art, and this 
same desire to serve the needs 
of the amateur community. Out 
of this has come a national net* 
work of two meter repeater 
systems that spans the nation. 
It's almost impossible these 
days to travel anywhere within 
the 50 states and not be in 
range ot a two meter repeater. 
Ten years ago, when I first 
drove across the country, the 
rule of the day was hunt and 
peck. Today, you can't get 
away from a QSO. Repeaters 
are everywhere and that's 
good. 

However, I have to ask the 
followmg questions: How many 
repeaters are enough? What 
total number of systems will 
constitute fulfilling everyone's 
needs? Is the magic number 
2,000? 5,000? 10,000? Will the 
"need for repeaters" keep go- 
ing until every amateur has his 
own system for his exclusive 
use? Is there a real need for any 
more than we have now? 

A repeater is of little use 
unless it is used. One that is 
placed into operation and 
winds up with one QSO every 
three days is of little value and 
Is better taken out of service, 
since it is then nothing but an 
economic drain to its owner. 
There are exceptions to this. 
Repeaters serving areas such 
as our nation's wildernesses 
and deserts as tines of 
emergency communications 
and vehicles for friendly chit- 
chat are an entirely different 
thing. Their need is dictated by 
their service area. However, 
here in L.A. proper, for exam- 
ple, we have a myriad of 
repeater systems. You can 



hardly find a channel that does 
not have one or more (usually 
more) repeaters coordinated on 
it. Yet, although good quality, 
wide coverage repeaters of 
"open" format reside on these 
channels, you can sometimes 
listen tor days on a channel and 
not hear one QSO lake place. 
You can hear an occasional 
kerchunk without an identifica- 
tion other than that of the 
repeater itself, but not a QSO. 
The why*s and wherefore's of 
this phenomenon are unknown 
to me, but it exists here and, \ 
am willing to bet, in other big 
cities. There may be 25 or 50 
repeaters available, but three 
or four account for the majority 
of activity. 

If this Is the case, why go 
ahead and put more repeaters 
on the air Just to take up space? 
There is a tar better way, but It 
lakes implementation of a term 
that Is very lacking in today's 
society: cooperation. Say your 
group decides that it wants the 
advantages of its own repeater 
and makes plans to put one up. 
Well, that's one way, the usual 
way. However, if you take the 
time to searcli around a bit, I 
am willing to bet that you will 
discover inactive operational 
systems in your area that can 
fulfill the needs ot your organ- 
ization. Should such be the 
case, you can save yourself the 
aggravation of repeater owner- 
ship by working out a coop- 
erative venture with the 
system's owner to utilize the 
relay ability of the system In ex- 
change for the ongoing support 
that a system needs. In this 
way, you have no initial invest- 
ment and no ownership respon- 
sibilities— yet the relay ability 
of the repeater is yours. It's 
called 'cooperative opera- 
tion/* and it works. 

Let me cite an example. One 
of the nicest ways to operate 
on two meter FM in Los 
Angeles is through the 
WR6AHM repeater located 
atop Magic Mountain. This 
"box'' seems to "talk forever/' 
yet its operation is very clean 
and the people who operate on 
It regularly are some of the 
nicest to be found anywhere. 
Virtually everyone you speak to 
thinks that the WR6AHM re- 
peater IS owned and operated 
by the Santa Clarita Amateur 
Radio Club. While it's true thai 
you find a lot of SO ARC mem- 
bers on WR6AHM, the club 
does not own the radio. 
WR6AHM is owned by an in- 
dividual amateur, and the San* 
ta Clarita club acts as a user 
support organization for the 
repeater. Such has been the 
case for a good many years, 



and this relationship has 
worked well for both parties. 
Everyone has what he needs, 
and thereby the need for 
another repeater is negated. If 
such agreements can be made 
to work here in a political hot- 
bed like Los Angeles, I can't 
imagine any place where they 
wouldn't- 

Another problem that is aris- 
ing Is that of user allegiance. 
Simply put, a user can*t be ex- 
pected to financially support 
every repeater upon which he 
operates, As more systems 
come into being, financial sup- 
port dwindles, since the 
average user cannot decide 
which particular repeater 
deserves his support. So he 
supports none. In the end, this 
will lead (and already has led) 
to **open repeater attrition," 
When a system owner finds 
that the egotrip is over, that it's 
costing him a bundle to keep 
"WR whatever" on the air, and 
that the majority of users are 
not "doing right" by the service 
he is providing, he has but two 
alternatives. He can either take 
the repeater out of service, or, 
as more and more system 
owners are doing, he can con- 
vert it to a '^private" system 
with a select usership. Since 
the vast majority of **privates" 
require financial support as a 
part of system club member- 
ship, they have little in the way 
of user support probiems, I'm 
not predicting that every open 
system in the nation is about to 
disappear; but it has happened 
already and will probably con- 
tinue. I know that even men- 
tioning '^repeater support'' is a 
sore spot for many, but we hap- 
pen to live in a real world which 
requires real money. 

If we regularly use a system. 
we have an obligation to do our 
share to keep it on the air. it we 
use five regularly, we have the 
obligation to support all five . . . 
or ten, or twenty, or what have 
you. This can really get expen- 
sive, and very few of us can af- 
ford to support all the open 
systems in an area like New 
York or Chicago, So how do we 
do it? Well, I have all sorts of 
ideas along these lines, such 
as a central support fund or a 
support fund set up through the 
local coordination council, but 
some people would always say 
that they were not getting 
enough. Therefore, I will leave 
the solution to your imagina- 
tion. One thing is clear, though: 
If open repeaters are to survive, 
it's up to each of us in his own 
way and to the best of his abill^ 
ty to render the necessary sup- 
port—be It financial or other- 
wise. 

"REMOTE NOTE" 
DEPARTMENT 

I recently received a letter 



from Bill Kleronomos WA90ZG 
in Westchester^ lllir\ois. Bill 
owns WR9AMI, one of the few 
"California-style" remotes 
found outside of California. 
The letter concerned ten meter 
FM and establishing an inter- 
national 10 meter remote inter- 
com channel. Actually, Bill sug- 
gested a national channel, but, 
ten meters being the kind of 
band it is, any intercom chan- 
nel would actually be interna* 
tional in nature. Weli, 29.6 is the 
national FM calling channel, 
but when ten opens, 29.6 does 
get kind of hectic. Anything 
below 29,5 would interfere with 
OSCAR operations, and above 
that you have repeater chan- 
nels. So by default, we have no 
place other than 29.5^ I think 
that 29.5 might be what 
remotes need as a common 
meeting ground for channel- 
ized long-haul operations. Any 
takers? 

Bill would also like to know 
of others involved In 10 meter 
remotes, especially on the air. 
To quote Bill's note: ". . . it 
kinda gets lonely being the only 
remote W6*style in this here 
corncob country." 

"SOME NOTES ON 220'* 
DEPARTMENT 

\ guess I must be on 
everyone*s mailing list, since 
quitea bit of literature seems to 
arrive each month. In most 
cases, there is just far too 
much to mention in this col- 
umn. However, once in a while 
something really special shows 
up, and this seems to be the 
case with a newsletter called 
220 Notes. 

Published in Chicago by Lee 
Knirko W9M0L, Notes has 
quickly grown from a regional 
sen/ice publication to a bi- 
monthly which has the ability 
to hold the interest of any 
amateur involved In 220 MHz 
FM and repeater operation. For 
example^ a recent issue 
(February, 1978) contained a 
most interesting article thai 
covered all of the currently 
available 220 MHz FM equip- 
ment, including antennas and 
accessories. It is probably the 
most complete listing of such 
information to be found any* 
where, and it Is obvious that 
Mike Sterling WA9QGY spent a 
lot of time researching his 
material. The same issue con- 
tained an article on Improving 
repeater audio, and even a 
short piece on playing chess 
via amateur radio. Notes is just 
chock-full of all sorts of in- 
teresting material and is well 
worth the nominal $3.00 sub- 
scription fee that brings you a 
year's worth of enjoyment. To 
subscribe, send $3.00 to 220 
Notes, c/o Virginia Sterling 
WB9UFV, 9128 N. Lindner Ave., 
Morton Grove IL 6007a 



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RTTY Loop 



Marc L L^vsy, M.a WA3AJa 
4006 Wmlee Ro3d 
Handaf^sto^M7 MD 2ff33 

These days, no technical 
topic in amateur radio is ''hot- 
ter" than microprocessors and 
computers, and perhaps 
nowhere else in our hobby is a 
computer more useful than in 
RTTY* This is evidenced by the 
growth of the i/0 section in 73, 
and the many reiated topics 
seen in Kilobaud, Byte, and 
other computer pybiications. 
What we wiil try to do this 
month is develop the logic for a 
RTTY receiving program, which 
can be impiemented on about 
any microprocessor. Next 
month, detailed information for 
programming an SWTPC 6800 
will be presented. 

To begin with, let's def i ne the 
problem. We must: 

1. Input data to the com- 
puter from a 60mA, Baudot 
encoded, 45.45 baud loop; 

2. Transform that data to a 
machine-usable form; 

3. Convert the Baudot 
code to ASCII; 

4. Display the data to the 
operaton 

There are several ways of 
getting information out of a 
loop at non-ioop levels. Two of 
the more common are op* 
toisolators and reed relays. Op- 
toisolators are tiny, encap- 



INPUT 






Xs"tE^V. 


MO 



"1* 


fE5 














COtilfT*^ 






























lUfPlTT 




IHtFT ACC 
(.fFT 








1 












^C 











TES 



GiD 

f\g, t Input Baudot data. 



sulated units that have an LED 
shining on a photosensitive 
diode or SCR (LASCR). As the 
LEO shines, the diode con- 
ducts, and TTL level voUages, 
which are the levels that make 
most computer inputs happy, 
can be controlled. The altar- 
native, the magnetic reed relay, 
has been covered before in this 
column in the context of 
transmitting keyers. if you have 
such a relay Instailed, it can be 
used for this application direct- 
ly, or another can be Inserted. 
Whatever the technique (even a 
polar relay can be pressed into 
service), the object fs to have a 
pair of wires isoiated from the 
loop that are shorted together 
during MARK and open during 
SPACE. 

Once you have these wires, 
one of them should be con- 
nected to the computer prot/zitf, 
and the other to the least 
significant bit (LSB) of a 
paraflel Input port. A pull-up 
resistor to h-5 V may be re- 
quired, as with the Southwest 
MP-LA parallel board. Now, you 
may have noticed that we are 
taking serially encoded data 
and feeding it to a parallel In- 
put. That is because many of 
the UARTs normally used have 
two faults which make them 
unusable for our purposes. 
Firsts they cannot be con- 
figured for five bits, which 
Baudot Is, and second, the 
available clock is normally 
faster than 45 baud. So what we 
wiil do is present the data to an 
open porl< and let the serlai-to- 
parallel conversion be done in 
software. 

Fig, 1 Is a diagram of just 
how that transformation takes 
place. Recall that the five bit 
Baudot code is really transmit- 
ted as a seven and one-half bit 
string. First comes the START 
bit— always SPACE— followed 
by the five DATA bits, then a 
STOP bit— always MARK— 
which is 1,5 times as long as 
any other bit. Keep this In mind 
as we scan the flowchart. 

To begin with, the computer 
lust sits there and waits for a 
SPACE to appear on the input 
line, Thts means that a 
character is on the way, The 
computer then delays for 11 
milliseconds (remember that a 
pulse is 22 ms long), which 
makes it the center of the 
START pulse, then an addi- 
tional 22 ms, putting It smack 
dab in the middle of the first 
data bit. Meanwhile, a counter 
is set up to count down the five 
data pulses. Each pulse is in- 
put into the accumulator^ 
which has its contents shifted 



after each entry to build a 
replica of the character there* 
Again, a 22 ms delay is built in 
after each sample, to place the 
sampling time within the data 
pulse. As an aside, more com- 
plex programs could sample 
each data pulse multiple times, 
and logically decide whether a 
bit was MARK or SPACE, thus 
offering a good deal of noise 
immunity in the decoding. We 
come out of this routine, then, 
with a representation of the 
Baudot letter in the right side 
(LSB side) of the accumulator. 

Our next task is to convert 
this Baudot data Into ASCII. 
The method for this is dia- 
grammed in Fig. 2. This is the 
"lookup table'' method of code 
conversion, which is reliabie 
and fast enough for such a 
transformation. Because 
Baudot contains no informa- 
tion as to whether the current 
character Is upper or lower 
case, a case *'flag" must be 
maintained to tell the program 
which of two tables, upper or 
lower case, to use. Receipt of 
the LTRS or FIGS characters 
can cause resetting of this flag. 
So, the incoming character is 
checked first to see if it is a 
LTRS or FiGS; if so, the flag is 
set accordingly. Next, it is 
tested for a space character 
which, if present, forces the fet- 
ters table to be selected. This 
accomplishes a software 
•'downshift-on-space," Also, 
carnage returns are decoded 
as an entire carriage- 
return/line- feed/erase- line 
string, and line feeds are 
trapped and not decoded. If 
none of the exceptions are en- 
countered, the table looks up 
the character at the address 
pointed to [n Baudot and sup- 
plies the ASCII equivalent. 

Now it gets easy. Most, if not 
ail, monitors have a routine to 
output a character in the ac- 







MT LTHS 



t£S 



tA«U 



cumulalor to the terminal Ifs 
called OUTEEE in Motorola 
MIKBUGTM. All you have to do is 
call that routine and you're in 
business, right? NO/ If you slop 
to think for a minute, realize 
that while all this looking up 
and converting has been going 
on, the next character has been 
warming up to come down the 
pike. In fact, you can consider 
that the time you have to send 
the character Is from after you 
get the fifth bit and decode un- 
til the next START pulse is ex- 
pected, That's approximately 
the width of the STOP bit: 31 
ms! A 110 baud terminal, like 
an ASR-33, is just too slow to 
receive 60 wpm RTTYl The 
minimum speed for acceptable 
copy, with no margin of safety, 
is 300 baud; taster is better. 
This limits us to TVTs or rapid 
printers. An alternative is to put 
the text into memory while 
displaying H, and have it read 
back at 110 baud later, for the 
slowpoke ASR-33S in the 
crowd. 

Next month I will cover the 
implementation of this pro- 
gram on an SWTPC 6800 
system in some detail. For 
those of you anticipating trying 
il, ] will tell you that you need 
the reed relay or equivalent in- 
stalled, an MP-L or MP*LA 
parallel input port, and not very 
much memory. The whole 
shebang will run in under 2K of 
RAM. Those of you with other 
systems may take a stab at 
writing some programs. Send 
any good ones along and we 
may include them in future col- 
umns. 

For those of you who cannot 
stand "one more article about 
dem blasted computers/' bear 
with me next month. You've 
been outvoted by numerous let- 
ters. After that, we'll get back to 
answering many of the ques^ 
tions sent in. 



DO ^ 

CB-Lf 



Str FLAG 
FiGfi 







FLifi 



CCKIt WITM A 



OCT h 



If W TO 
M£Kt 



3 



Fig. 2. Decoding. 



22 



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AMSAT 



ANOTHER AMSAT OSCAR 
IS IN ORBIT 

Precisely on time and with all 
the characteristics of a text- 
book description of a rocket 
launch, a Delta 139 rocket rifted 
off from the NASA Western 
Test Range at Lompoc, Call- 
fornJa, on March 5 at 9:34 am 
PST. It was carrying AMSAP 
OSCAR 8 as a secondary 
pay load, with its primary mis- 
sion the LANDSAT-C. There is a 
third payload aboard. It Is the 
PIX, Plasma Interaction Experi- 
ment, devised by researchers 
at NASA's Lewis Research 
Center In Cleveland, Ohio. The 
experiment is designed to 
study the effects of the space 
environment on high voltage 
components in the presence of 
arcing. This is of significance 
for high voltage solar panels 
and ion propulsion systems in 
future spacecraft 

The eighth OSCAR replaces 
the capability that had been 
lost when OSCAR 6 went out of 
service in the latter part of 
June, 1977, due to battery 
failure, Its demise was has- 
fened by the selfish users who 
attempted accessing OSCAR 6 
with powers many orders of 
magnitude higher thari the 
recommended maximum of 100 
Watts erp. (A 10 Watt transmit- 
ter will get you into OSCAR 7 
and also into the new OSCAR 
8.) 

In AMSAT-OSCAR 8 the 
mode A translator will provide 
the same capability that the 2 
meter-to-10 meter translator 
did in OSCAR 6. The uplink 
passband is from 145.85 M H2 to 
145.95 MHz with an output from 
29.45 to 29.55 MHz. The trans I a^ 
tton is linear so that an upper 
sideband Input signal will also 
be upper sideband on the out- 
put. The mode A beacon fre- 
quency is at 29,402 MHz. 

A capability not previously 
available in the circumpolar or- 
biting OSCARS is the 2 meter- 
to*70 centimeter translator with 
an input passband from 145.9 
to 146.0 MHz. This is the mode- 
J translator with a downlink 
passband of 405,2 to 435.1 
MHz. The descending order is 
to signify that the output pass- 
band is Inverted with respect to 
the input. There is a beacon at 
435.095 MHz. 

The mode A translator was 
designed and built by Richard 
Daniels WA4DGU and Dr. Perry 
I Klein W3PK {AMSAT Presf^ 
dent). The mode J translator 
was built by members of the 
Japanese affiliate of AMSAT; 
known as JAMSAT. JA1CBL, 
JGICBU JG1CDM. JAtJHF, 
and JRtSWB are among the 



calls listed as having con- 
tributed. 

The beacons transmit Morse 
code telemetry data relating to 
the condition of the spacecraft 
and its components. The 
AMSAT-OSCAR 8 telemetry 
systems is a product of the ef- 
forts of John Goode W5CAY, 
Dick Daniels, and others. It 
measures six analog param- 
eters in the spacecraft, and 
converts them into two digit 
Morse code values which are 
transmitted along with a third 
digit preceding each telem- 
etered value to identify the 
channel number. The code rate 
is 20 wpm. 

As this is being written, 
OSCAR 8 is in good health as 
determined by its telemetered 
data, and it is open for yse by 
amateurs all over the world. 
AMSAT. the ARRU and AMSAT 
affiliates are urged to prevail 
upon their members and users 
not to exceed the recommend- 
ed power limit of 100 W erp 
when accessing OSCAR 8 (and 
OSCAR 7, as well). 

It was a primary purpose in 
hurrying AMSAT-OSCAR 8 into 
orbit to give back to the 
schools a space communica- 
tions vehicle which they could 
use in science classes to per- 
mit their students to have a 
hands-on experience with 
space communications, space 
technology, orbital science, 
and the computational and 
technical aspects of this new 
frontier. For this reason, at the 
present time the mode A trans- 
lator will be in operation on 
Mondays, Tuesdays, Thurs- 
days, and Fridays GMT. The 
Wednesday periods wHl be 
available for experimenters. 
The mode J translator will be In 
operation from zero hour GMT 
Saturday until 23:59:59 Sun- 
days GMT, Orbit mformalion is 
broadcast on W1AW and the 
AMSAT nets. For information, 
contact Bernie Glassmeyer 
W9KDR at ARRL headquarters, 
or AMSAT at PO Box 27, 
Washington, D.a 20044> 

Or. Normfin L ChaTffn K6FGX 

Pasadena CA 



AMSAT OSCAR 8 
UUNCHED 

A-O-D became AMSAT- 
OSCAR 8 on Sunday. March 5, 
1978. A "textbook" launch fired 
LANDSAT-C and its passen- 
gers into orbit from the 
Vandenberg Air Force Base In 
California, 551 milliseconds 
into the launch window. Radio 
amateurs around the world 
followed the launch sequence 
In real time by means of the 



AMSAT Launch Day Opera- 
tions Nets activated by W3ZM, 
WA3NAN, and others. The 
voice of WIN Webster WB2Tr4C 
operating from WA3NAN at the 
Goddard Space Flight Center in 
Maryland echoed around the 
world as he relayed the launch 
and subsequent phases of the 
orbit injection sequences. 
Such was the level of interest 
that several times no signals 
were present on 14280 kHz for 
periods ranging up to 90 sec- 
onds at critical pornts in the 
mission sequence. These 
periods of silence on 1 4280 kHz 
took place right in the middle of 
the ARRL DX Phone Contest. 
Hundreds ot stations checked 
into the nets; many more called 
in or just monitored the activity. 

The flight of the launch vehi- 
cle was followed, the ejection 
of LANDSAT noted, the addi- 
tional orbit correction burns 
noted, and then OSCAR was 
ejected. Then, WA3NAN an- 
nounced that OSCAR was free. 
14280 kHz was silent; then 
G2BVN called in with the first 
report of telemetry reception 
from the AMSAT-OSCAR 8 
spacecraft. Minutes later, 
WfiPHD reported the first 
American reception of signals. 
Stations reporting reception of 
the telemetry on the first two 
orbits included VE6SW, 
GMBBKE, and N6DD; 

WB5MPU reported one frame 
of telemetry wrhen the sateilite 
was well below his horizon. 
DL3SX telephoned Washing- 
ton. D.C., with telemetry data. 
Early telemetry showed that 
the spacecraft was spinning at 
the gentle rate of 1 .3 rpm. It was 
then decided to extend the 10 
meter antenna on the first pass 
over the eastern USA that 
night. Interest was high; 
everyone was available and the 
net opened up on 3850 kHz. 
Randy VE3SAT, the command 
station, relayed the sequence 
of events as he sent the com- 
mands to the spacecraft and 
the *'beep. beep, beep" of 
435.095 MHz as the antenna 



deployed was heard. 

The initial telemetry data as 
reported by Roy Stevens 
G2BVN was: tone, 391 459 556 
603 HI 173 251 389 459 556 606. 
During the first few orbits, the 
spacecraft stabilized. It should 
t>e noted that stations report- 
ing from the USA indicated that 
channel 6 was showing counts 
of the order of 601-603, yet sta* 
tions in Europe were reporting 
618-623, showing that signals 
were present in the uplink pass- 
band fn Europe. 

Joe Kssser G3ZCZA/V3 
Silver Spring MD 

AMSAT-OSCAR S ORBITAL 
DATA CALENDAR 

In cooperation with AMSAT, 
Skip Reymann W6PAJ expects 
to have available by the end of 
May an AMSAT-OSCAR orbital 
predictions calendar contain* 
ing all orbits of the new 
AMSAT-OSCAR 8 satellite for 
the remainder of 1978. 

The orbital calendar will be 
available postpaid for S5.00 
U.S. funds or 30 IRCs <S3.00 to 
AMSAT members, and free on 
request to AMSAT life mem- 
bers). Overseas orders will be 
airmailed. Orders and pay- 
ments should be made in U.S. 
currency to: Skip Reymann 
W6PAJ, PC Box 374, San 
Dimas, California 91773 USA, 
Orders may also be charged to 
VISA or Master Charge, <Be 
sure to provide your account 
number, expiration date, and 
other information on your 
charge card.) 

For those still without an 
AMSAT-OSCAR 7 orbital calen^ 
dar, a new printing is expected 
to be available shortly from 
Skip Reymann, Prices and 
ordering information are the 
same as for the OSCAR 8 calen- 
dar. 

important: To speed up han- 
dling of your order, please in- 
clude a gummed, self-ad- 
dressed label. 

Proceeds from the orbital 
calendar benefit AMSAT, 



Ham Help 



I need a schematic for an 
RME 4350 receiver. Can some- 
one help? 

William Bragg 
1424 College 

Des Mofne5lA50314 

I need a manual or schematic 

for a Heath model OMI scope. 

Mickey McDaniel W6FGE 

940 Temple St. 

San Diego C A 921 06 



I would Kke to hear from any 
amateur radio operator who Is 



using a heart pacemaker. 

Joseph Schwartz K2VGV 
43 34 Union Street 
Flushing NY 11355 

I am looking for some infor* 
mation on using an 1821 
transmitting tube as a final 
amplTfier in a 2 meter SSB 
transmitter. I have checked 
through a lot of 73 Magazines 
but have not come up with any 
articles using an 1821 tube. 

John Flynn K3BD0 

1925 Kansas Ave. 

McKeesport PA 15131 



24 



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Washington, D.C. 2D5S4 

In the Milter of 

Ain»fxfm«fit of Part B7 of th« 
Ci>nimUsiai>'s Rufes concerning 
Of)«rstor classes, privileges, and 
requirements in tlie Amateur Radia 
Service. 

Docket 202a2 

RM-1016, 1363, 1454, 1456, 
1516, 1521, 1526. 1535, 1568, 
1S7Z 1602,1615. 1629,1633, 
1656, 1724. 1?93. 1605. 1641, 
1920. ia47, 1976, 1991, 2030. 
aCM3, 2053. 21 4S, 2150. 2162, 
2166. 2216, 2219, 2256. 2264, 
2449 

Second Report and Ord«r 

Adopted: March 22. 1978; 
Released: April 6, 1976 
By the Commission: Commissioner 
White dissenting. 

1 On December 16, 1974. the Com- 
mission released a Notice of Pro- 
posed Rule Making in this proc&edmg 
which was published in the Federal 
Regisreron December 20. 19?4 (39 FR 
44D42). A First Report and Order was 
released on June 15, 1976 (41 FR 
25013], This Second f^eport and Order 
is a further step m the resolution of 
the very compter and far-reaching 
proposals of I he Notice, 

2 In the Notice, the Commission 
proposecf to expand the frequencies 
availabJe to Technfctan Class 
licenses, PresenHy. Techriicians may 
operate in the bands 50.1-54.0 MHz, 



145*148 WtHz, and on all amateur fre- 
quencies above 220 MHz. The pro- 
posed rules would have permitted 
operation on all amateur frequencies 
above 50 MHz. This proposal was sup- 
ported by the American Radio ReJay 
LeaQue {ARRLj in its comments, and 
by numerous mdtvidual amateurs. 

3. In light of actions now being 
taken in Docket 21033 concerning Ire- 
qyencies available for repeater sta- 
tion use, we believe the time has 
come to grant expanded frequency 
privileges to Technicians. Speciflcaf- 
ly. we will amend Section 97 7(d) of 
the Amateur Radio Service Rules to 
permit Technician Class llceiisees to 
operate on all frequencies above 50 
MH2L We believe this action will give 
greater flexibility to such licensees 
who wish to do experimer^tal and 
weak'Slgr^al work m the 50 MHz and 
144 MHi bands. 

4 In Docket 20282 the Commis- 
sion also proposed to make the 
Novice Class operator license, which 
Is currently a two-year nonrenewable 
license, a five-year renewable license. 
There was strong support for this pro- 
posal m the comments, and we are 
adopting it as proposed. We are 
amending Section 97.13 of the Rutes 
accordingly. Licensees now holding 
Novice Class licenses may renew 
them upon proper application. 

5. In view of the foregoing, we 
believe that the amended rules, as 
discussed above, are in the^public in- 
terest. AGcordlngly, pursuant to 
authority contained in Sections 4(1) 
and 303 ot the Communications Act 
of 1 934, as amended, tt is ordered t hat 
Part 97 ot the Commission's Rules *s 
amended as set forth in the attached 
Appendix, it is further ordered that 
this proceeding is continued The rute 
amendf^ents adopted herein become 



Ham Help 



Help! IVe purchased an 
oscilloscope at an auction and 
now I need a schematic/opera- 
tion manual for it. Letters to the 
manufacturer are unanswered 
and phone calls end in no 
listings in Glendale, LI, NY, It is 
a Paco Electronics Co., Inc. 
(Precision Apparatus Co.), 



direct coupled dc to 5 MHz. 
wide band oscilloscope, model 
#S'55, serial #2772. 

I wjfl gladly pay reasonable 
copying/shipping, etc., costs 
for the information. 

Donald M, Fielding W4FGT 

2207 NWai St Place 

Margate FL 33003 



effective May 15. 197B. 

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS 

COMMISSION 

William J. Trice rlco 

Sec re la nr 

APPENDIX 
Part 97 ot Chapter 1 of Title 47 of 
the Code of Federal Regulations is 
amended, as follows: 

1, §97.7(d) is amended to read, as 
follows: 

§97.7 PrivHeges of operatof 

licenses, 
(dj Technician Class. All authorized 
amateur privileges on the frequencies 
50.0 MHz and above. Technician 
Class licenses also convey the full 
privileges of Novice Class licenses. 

2. In §97.13, paragraph (b) is deleted, 
paragraplis {c) through (f) are redesig- 
nated paragraphs (b) through (e). and 
paragraph (a) is amended, as follows: 

07.13 Renewal or modification of 

operator license, 
fa) An amateur radio operator license 
may be renewed upon proper applica- 
liort 



PART 97— AMATEUR RADIO 
SERVICE 

/B7 12^01; 

Amateur Radio Operation In the 
220-225 MHz Bind in Portions of the 
Slates of Texas An<i New Mexico per 
Previous Commission Order 

AGENCY: Federal Communications 
Commission. 
ACTION: Editorial order. 
SUMMARY: The FCC Is deleting a 
restriction on the operation of 
amateur radio stations in parts of 
Texas and New Meiiico in the 220 
MH2-225 MHz hand. This action is be- 
ing taken to make the FCC's amateur 
radio rules consistent with the FCC's 
Table ot Frequency Allocations. 
EFFECTIVE DATE: April 10, 1978. 
ADDRESS: Federal Commimicatlons 
Commission, Washington. DC- 
20554. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CON- 
TACT: Mr. Gregory Monroe Jones, 
Rules and Legal Bra^ch^ Personai 
Radio Division, Safety and Special 
Radio Services Bureau. 202-634-6619. 
(This is not a loM-free telephone 
number.) 

Adopted: March 24, 1978. 
Released: March 29. 1978. 

Ordet \n the matter of Amendment 
of part 97 of the Commission's rules 
10 delete §97.6ifbK6J. concerning 
amateur radto operation in the 
220 225 MHz band in portrons of the 
States of Texas and New Mexico per 
previous Commission Order, 

1, On November 22, 1977, the Com- 



mission adopted an Order which 
eliminated footnote NG 13 lo the 
Table of Frequency Allocations, 
§2.106 of the Commission's rules. 
This footnote imposed restrmtions on 
the use, by the Amateur Radio Sef- 
vice. of the 220-225 MHz band in cer^ 
tain areas of the United States. 

2. The deletion of NG 13 removed 
the restriction on the use of the 
220-225 MHz txand by amateur sta- 
tions between the hours of 0500 and 
1800 local time Monday through Fri- 
day. inclusive, in those portions of the 
States of Texas and New Mexico in 
the area t>ounded on the south by 
parallel 31*53' N.. on the east by 
longitude 105*40' W., on the north by 
parallel 33*24' N., and on the west by 
iongKude 106*40' W. Amateur sta- 
tions are now permitted lo operate on 
the 220-225 MHz band In all portions 
of the United States subject to the 
coniinuing restriction of footnote 
U.S. 34. whrch prohibits harmful in- 
terference to the Radjo-localron Ser- 
vice. 

3. Footnote NG 13 ts duplicated in 
§97.6HbK6) of the rules. The Commis- 
sion's Order of November 22, 1977 on- 
ly deleted Footnote NG 13, however. It 
did not eliminate &97.61(bH6). This 
Order deletes §97.61 (b)(6). 

4. Since tine amendment we are 
adopting is editorial in nature, the 
prior notice and public procedure pro- 
visions of the Administrative Pro- 
cedure Act, 5 U.S.C. 553, are not ap- 
plicable. Authority for this action Is 
contained m sections 4(i), 5<d), and 
303 of I he Gommunicatrons Act of 
1934, as amended. 

5. Accorcfingfy, if ts ordered. That 
§97.6i(bK6) of the rules Is deleted as 
shown in the attaclned Appendk 
effective April 10, 1976. 

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS 

COMMISSION 

Richard D. Lichtwardt 

Eiiecutive OlrectOf 

Part 97 of Chapter 1 of Title 47 of 
the Code of Federal Regylal^ons is 
amended as follows: 

1. In §97.61. authorized frequencies 
and emissions, flmitation [h){S) is 
deleted and designated {Reserved) as 
follows: 

§97.61 Authorized ffequencies and 
emissions- 
(a> 

Fr»q(j*ftcy pnlHionf Uwitnlam 



220-235 

* 

■r 



A0.A1.A3.A3.A4.A5. 
F0,Fnl^a.F3,FJ. 
FS 



I I K ■ I- I 




There's a new, eighth OSCAR sateltlte in orbit, and the AMSAT team helped put It there! 

Your help is needed For future satellites, (oln AMSAT and support the new. ad- 
vanced Phase II series of OSCARs, engineered to provide communications over 
transcontinental distances for hours at a time. 

Send $100 membership dues to AMSAT, P.O. Box 27, Washington, DX. 
20044. Life membership is available for a tax-deductible donation of $ 1 00 
or more, payable in quarterly installments if you wish. y/^CP^ 

Phase in satellite solar cells may be sponsored for $10 each, and j/<^ ^^ #% 
we I) send you a certificate specifying the cells you are sponsoring, y^i^ ^^ Ah. ▼ 

For a taX'deductible contribution of $1,000 or more, weMI 
even inscribe your name on a plaque to be placed in orbit 
aboard the Phase III spacecraft for posterity, and we'll sen< 
you a replica honoring your contribution. 

Dues and contributions may be charged to VISA or 
Master Charge, Phone us at (20Z) 488-8649, 




25 



Social E/ents 



MIDLAND Ml 
JUN3 

The fourth annual Midland 
hamfest sponsored by 
C.M.A.R.A., Inc. (Central 
Michigan Amateur Repeater 
Association) will be held at the 
Midland County Fairgrounds in 
Midland, Michigan, on June 3, 
1978. Canr^ping Friday night 
will be S4.00 per t railed Tl!« 
swap and shop on Saturday 
will be from 7:00 ann until 3:00 
pm. There witl be a big com^ 
puter demonstration wjth 
many systems on display run- 
ning. The drawing for door 
prizes will be held at 2:30 Satur- 
day; Tickets will be S1.50 in ad- 
vance. $2.00 at the door. Kids 
under 12 are free with parent. 
Send an SASE with your check 
to: D. Zahm WBSSDJ, 3871 
Monroe. Rte- 8, Midland Ml 
48640. For commercial ex- 
hibits, reserve in advance by 
contacting J. Gunsher WSJOW, 
4307 Bfuebird Dr., Midland Mi 
48640. Tables will be available 
at the door or by reservation 
now (approximately 3' x 6') for 
$2.00 each. Talk-in on 07/67 
Mtdtand and 13/73 Pleasant 
Valley, portables on 52. An auc- 
tion sale will start at 1:00 for all 
the stuff you don't want to take 
home. Take h75 north to U.S- 10 
west (Midland) to the Eastman 
Rd. exit. 

MINNEAPOLIS ST. PAUL MN 
JUN 3 

Dakota's Division's largest 
swapfest and exposition for 
amateur radio operators and 
computer hobbyists will be 
held on Saturday, June 3, at the 
Minnesota State Fairgrounds. 



Free overntght parking for self- 
contained campers on June 2 
only. Talk-in on 16/76 and 52/52. 
Sell from your car in the giant 
lEea market. Enside space avail- 
able. There will be many great 
prizes, and forums are schedul- 
ed on FM and microprocessors. 
Admission will be SZOO. For in- 
formation or reservations for 
commercial exhibit space, call 
(612)-933-2823. 

CHELSEA Ml 
JUN 4 

The West Washtenaw swap 
and shop, sponsored by the 
Dexter Amateur Radio Club and 
the Chelsea Communicatrons 
Club, will be held at the 
Chelsea Fairgrounds on June 
4th, from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm. 
Donations are $1.50 in ad* 
vance, $2.00 at the gate. Table 
space wfll be sold at $,50 a foot, 
and trunk sales are $1.00 per 
space. 

ISLIP NY 
JUN 4 

The next hamfest sponsored 
by the Long Island Mobile 
Amateur Radio Club, LI MARC, 
will be held Sunday, June 4, 
1978, at the (slip Speedway, 
Islip NY. The gate will be open 
from 9:30 am to 4:00 pm. Gen- 
eral admission is $1.50. All 
licensed amateurs are ex- 
pected to purchase a ticket, 
regardless of sex or age. 
Ladles and children 12 and 
under will be admitted free. 
Sellers' and exhibitors' spaces 
are available at $3,00 per 
space. Each space entitles you 
to have one person enter the 
grounds. All ticket holders will 
participate in the door prize 



drawings, so be sure to save 
your ticket. Food and refresh- 
ments will be available. Use 
your knowledge In the theory 
contest or your luck In the who- 
traveled-the-furthest-to-the- 
hamfest contest. LIMARC VHF 
tune-up clinic will be on hand 
to put you on frequency. Check 
FM deviation and spurious 
emissions. Be sure you bring a 
power cord. There will be a 
computer display, and ATV, 
satellite, and ARRL informa- 
tion. The speedway is located 
on Route 111 ((slip Ave.) one 
block south of exit 43 of the 
Southern State Parkway. Com- 
mercjal vehicles must come via 
the Long Island Expressway to 
exit 56 and go south on Route 
111 to the speedway. Taik4n on 
146.25/85 and 146.52. For infor- 
mation and advance ticket 
sates write to Hank Wener 
WB2ALW, 53 Sherrard St., East 
Hills NY 11577. Please enclose 
an SASE. CaH Hank— days 
(212)-355-0606, nights (516)- 
484-4322 Of call Ken Denston 
WB2RYC, nights only, at 
(516)-379^6463. 

WEST HUNTINGTON WV 

JUN 4 

The Tri-State Amateur Radio 
Association (TARA) will hold 
its 16th annual hamfest on 
Sunday, June 4, at 11:30 am at 
Camden Park, Rte. 60, West 
Huntington, West Virginia. 
Talk^ln on W8CA/8, 04/64, 
16/76, and 34/94. For informa- 
tion and tickets, write: TARA, 
PO Box 1295, Huntington WV 
25715. 

PRINCETON IL 

JUN 4 

The Starved Rook hamfest 
will be held on June 4, 1973, at 
the Bureau County Fair- 
grounds, Princeton, Illinois. Ad- 
vance registration is $1.50 if 



postmarked before May 25; 
after that it's $2.00. Send a 
large SASE, please, for regis- 
tration, map, information, etc., 
to W9MKS/WR9AFG/SRRC, 
RFD #1, Box 171, Oglesby, II* 
linois 61348, or phone (815)- 
667-4614. 

ROME NY 
JUN 4 

The Rome Radio Club wilt 
host Its 26th consecutive Ham 
Family Day on Sunday. June 4, 
1978, This Is a true ham family 
event, with a program tailored 
to the amateur radio operator 
and hisfamify. 

WEBSTER MA 
JUN 4 

On June 4, 1978, the Eastern 
Connecticut Amateur Radio 
Association will hold its 4th An* 
nual Giant Fleamarket at the 
Point Breeze Restaurant, Web* 
ster, Massachusetts, For infor- 
mation, call t203>-928'5930. 

MANASSAS VA 

JUN 4 

The "Ole Virginia Hams^* 
A.R.G., Inc., Annual Hamfest 
will be held on June 4, 1978, at 
the Prince William County Fair- 
grounds, located Vi mile south 
of Manassas VA, on Rt. 234, 
Gates will open at 7 am for 
tallgating and 8 am for general 
admission. There will be fan- 
tastic prizes again this year— a 
Drake TR4CW transceiver with 
BIT and ac power supply, a 
monitor scope, a Bird watt- 
meter with element, and many 
others. General admission will 
be $3.00 per person, under 12 
free. Tailgating will be $2.00 per 
vehicle, with over 300 spaces 
available. Breakfast, lunch, and 
refreshments will be served by 

Continue art page W2 



Ham Help 



I would like to hear from 
anyone wearing a Teletronlcs 
pacemaker from an Australian- 
based company. I am wearing 
one. 

116 Grandvfew Dr, 
Fenton MO 63026 

I recently purchased a Knight 
T-60 transmitter and a Knight 
nrtodel KG'650 rf generator. I am 
in a quandary as to where \ 
might locate operating and ser- 
vicing manuals, as well as 
schematics for both units. I 
would be willing to pay for the 
copies, 

Thomas S. Thiesing 

11005 Westonhill Drive 

San Diego CA 92128 

Please help! I have a Morrow 



radio system. I would like to 
have ft operating when I get my 
Novice license, I need a 
schematic and manual for the 
MB-560-A transmitter and the 
FTR-2. li will pay copying, 
postage, and handUng chafges, 

William R, Good 

PO Box 73 

Harborcreek PA 16421 

V6 like to get in touch with 
someone who has an image in- 
tensifier tube, or who knows 
where they can be obtained for 
use in amateur astronomy. 

George W. Smythe 

P0B84e 

Stony Brook NY 11790 

I need information on the 
DAVCO DR-30 receiver— toroid 
and coil specs, possible 



availability of parts and PC 
boards^ circuit design, etc. The 
company was in Tallahassee, 
Florida, and went out of 
business about 10 years ago. 
Can anyone from the company 
still be contacted? Tm trying to 
restore a OR*30 which had been 
"redesigned" by a "tech- 
nician/* 

Harry A, WInship K5HMU9 

4256 Jamie Court 

India napoits IN 46226 

(317}-dd7>456S 

Help! I need a speaker 
enclosure (with speaker intact) 
for my Halilcrafters SR^160 
transceiver. I don't need the 
power suppty with it (I already 
have that), but that's the only 
way amateur radio dealers I've 
phoned will supply rt, and most 
of them want to sell the rig, tool 
Any help would be appreciated. 

Timothy M Mn^a WDSQLB 

PO Bosc 234 
Elsie Ml 48331 



I am interested in locating 
and communicating with 
amateur radio operators han- 
dicapped or disabled. I would 
also like any information possi- 
ble on clubs or radio nets of 
this nature* 

Gary Mitchell WA1GXE 

PO Box 1003 

Fairfield CT 06430 

I would like to acquire the 
January, 1975, Issue of 73 
Magazine to complete my col- 
lection. Can anyone help? 

Douglas McArtln 

411 Bellevue Ave. 

Yonkefs NY 10703 

I would like to know if there is 
a ham club in the Sun bury, Pa„ 
area which helps people get 
their Novice licenses. 

Kevin Shlpe 

Box 1714 HUB 

Dickinson College 

Carlisle PA 17013 



20 



1 



2 



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RESONATES YOUR TOWER 



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Imagine using your 
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MEETS PART 97.73 
OF FCC REQUIREMENTS 



Yaesu Electronics Corp., 15954 Downey Ave., 
Paramount, CA 90723 • {2T3) 633-4007 

Eastern Service Ctr., 613 Redna Terrace 
Cincinnati, OH 45215 




Wayne Green W2NSD/1 

Editor /Publisher 



Happiness Is Being 
A Ham Manufacturer 

73 visits Cushcraft 



It may come as a surprise 
that there is one firm in 
the ham antenna business 
which makes more anten- 
nas than all the other 
manufacturers combined. 
That firm is Cushcraft. 
operating out of Man- 
chester, New Hampshire. 

Just last year, Cushcraft 
built a brand new plant in 
order to try and keep up 
with the growth of the 
business. This plant was 



designed and planned by 
Bob Cushman WA1QFY, 
son of the founder, Les 
Cushman W1BX. 

Les started Cushcraft in 
1950, specializing in VHP 
antennas. At the time, he 
had three or four employ- 
ees and was doing a lot of 
the work himself. Now. in 
new quarters with about 
100 employees, Les is still 
keeping in close touch with 
everything. 




The plant is laid out so that a truck can drive right into one 
end of the place to deliver raw materials — aluminum tub- 
ing for elements and booms, stock for clamps, coils, etc. 
Here, Dick St. HiHaire is unloading a long box of tubing 
with an electric winch. Why bother to drive the truck in- 
side f You haven t been through a New Hampshire winter, 
or you wouldn't ask. 

30 



When I needed some 
special VHP antennas for 
the 73 radio lab up on Mt. 
Monadnock, I naturally 
went to Cushcraft for 
them. We ended up with a 
336-element two meter 
beam which laid a signal 
down the east coast that 
you wouldn't believe. A 
ham down in Hampton. 
Virginia, claimed that, 
when conditions were 
stinko. the W2NSD/1 signal 
was only down to S-7. The 
Cushcraft 16-element six 
meter cottinear also put 
out a wicked signal, par- 



ticularly when backed with 
a kilowatt. 

Since I find it interesting 
to visit some of our 
manufacturers, I thought 
you might like to see where 
the Cushcraft antennas 
come from. 

Looking at the Cushcraft 
antennas from the stand- 
point of a user, they have 
their pluses and their 
minuses. The minus is that 
the confounded things 
never wear out, so, once 
you put up an antenna, you 
are darned well stuck with 
it. The plus is a consistently 




The larger tubing is cut into the right lengths fay this 
automatic tubing saw. 





Here's Ray Doville and Ctaire Jacob assembling batuns for 
the Cushcraft three-band beams. 




Debbie N areas is checking the pruning of a coil with an 
oscillator and frequency counter. They come to her a bit 
low in frequency, and she gets them right on with the coax- 
ial cable 'pencil sharpener" next to her hand. 



As we progess through the long buildings, we find more 
and more parts being made for the antennas — special 
clamps, Ringo Ranger hardware and tuning stubs, and all 
those nice things that come pouring out of an antenna box 
when you open it for assembly. Toward the back of the 
plant are racks of shelves full of these finished parts, ready 
for packing. 




good signal. 

I put a three-element 
20m Cushcraft up in 1965 



and immediately found 
myself banging heads with 
the top DXers , , . and win- 



Here's the press department where elements of the various 
antennas are cut to length and drilled for mountings. 



ning; I got on one contest 
weekend and worked 100 
countries on 20m side- 
band. Within one month, I 
had 200 countries and, 
within a year, 300. When I 



called them, they came 
back. 

ft was even more im- 
pressive on the other end, 
In 1966, t made a trip 
around the world, oper- 





Once the coils are pruned and tuned, they go to the epoxy This is the prepackaging department where all of the parts 
department so they'll be immune even to New Hampshire for the antennas are gathered together for packing in the 

weather and California rains. cartons. 



31 




Les Cushman talks with Bob Brown about a detail of a 
loading coil that he wants changed a bit. Les stays right on 
top of everything thaVs going on. 




Skin packaging is done here on antennas which will be 
sold through stores on display racks. 



ating from some very rare 
spots such as 5Z, OD. YK, 
YA. VU, 9N. 9V, FK8, VR2, 
KS6, 5W, F08, etc. No mat- 
ter where I was, my home 
station signal would come 
boiling through 

Some big VHF beams 
which were first used in 
1963 are still being used 



every year by a local ham 
group for the VHF con- 
tests. Those antennas first 
suffered massive icing on 
my mountain, and now 
they are trucked from 
Boston to a New Hamp- 
shire mountaintop and set 
up once or twice a year and 
they're still going I Cush- 




Element clamps and other small parts are machined with 
these drill presses. 




in the lab, where new antennas are developed and current 
designs are checked for performance, we see Dale Cle- 
ment WA1FSZ checking the tuning of a three-band beam. 
The test setup is a ham's dream, with a mQlor-drtven tower 
for changing antennas easily (well, relatively easHyl a fre- 
quency sweep spectrum analyzer, and an antenna pickup 
range fed with hardline coax. 



craft, you make them too 
good ! 

That 20m beam tasted 
for more than ten years 
before 1 replaced it with a 
new Cushcraft beam. Not 
bad, considering the rough 
New Hampshire winters. 

The next time you see a 
Cushcraft exhibit at a ham 
show, be sure to go over 



and say hello. Les doesn't 
get to very many shows; he 
prefers to stay in New 
Hampshire and give some 
of his new antenna ideas a 
workout on the ham bands. 
Bob gets around to some 
shows, but, other than that, 
he sticks close to the plant, 
keeping the antennas mov- 
ing out to dealers.! 



32 




Using a spectrum analyzer, the response of the three-barid 
beam can be clearly seen . . . just in case there was any 
doubt in your mind about a three-band beam being tuned 
carefully. Zero frequency is at the left of the screen, with 
the first pip being the 20 meter response; then there s the 
15m and, at the right the TOm response. The little blips are 
shortwave stations putting in signals strong enough to 
show up. That blip way over to the very right is probably a 
local two meter repeater. 





rTTBHwP^ 




Here's the crank-up tower with a three-band antenna in 

place for testing. Yes, on rare occasions we do have snow 
in New Hampshire. , . we have to — the ski areas would 
raise all hell if we didn't 




Here are hundreds of CushcraH antennas alt set to be 

shipped out to dealers to fill orders. The manufacturing ef- 
ficiencies of this new plant make it so Cushcraft can gear 
up and make a few hundred of a particular model within a 
few minutes, so it is not necessary to carry huge backlogs 
of antennas in order to quickly fill orders. 




Overall view of the Cushcraft plant, located in an in- 
dustrial park just south of Manchester, the largest city in 
New Hampshire. 




By an odd coincidence, right across the street from 

Cushcraft is Infotecs, an innovative firm in the microcom- 
puter field which was written up in the May issue of 
Kilobaud tnfotecs is the first firm to come along with a 
complete microcomputer package for an individual in- 
dustry^ the fuel oil delivery business. Their low cost and 
incredibly complete combination of computers and pro- 
grams have been revolutionizing the fuel oil business in 
New Hampshire and have already spread to nearby states, 
with Infotecs' ability to meet the demand being the con- 
trolling factor in their growth. 



33 



Harry D, Hooton W6TYH 
1420 Shamrock Lane 
Lincoin CA 95648 



Extended Double Zepp 



old-timer's delight 

still works 



My first transmitting 
antenna, way back 
in 1929, was a full-wave 
centerfed radiator with 
open -wire line- tuned 
feeders, commonly known 
at that time as a 'double 
Zepp." As amateur radio 
progressed, this antenna 
became known as a "pair 
of half waves in phase/' 
Still later, another version 
appeared and was called 
the "extended double 
Zepp" antenna. The very 
latest version used 
5/8-wavelength elements 
and had about 3 dB gain 
over a half-wave dipole- As 
any old-timer can tell you, 
these were potent DX 
antennas in their heyday, 
especially when you re- 
member that 50 Watts was 
''high power" and the 
latest store-bought receiv- 
er was the National SW-3. 
Strange as it may seem, 
the horizontal antennas to 
be described here were in- 
stalled as part of a research 

34 



project on phased and 
driven vertical arrays with 
which I was associated dur- 
ing 1976 and 1977. For this 
project, we needed several 
reference antennas with 
horizontal polarization 
and definitely known gain 
characteristics. It was de- 
sirable that the antenna 
gains were on the order of 
0, 3, and 6 dB; it was essen- 
tial for a "perfect" match 
to be obtained between 
each antenna, reference or 
otherwise, and its transmis- 
sion line. The use of coax- 
ial transmission lines was 
necessary so that we could 
switch the lines at the 
transmitter for "instant" 
comparisons between an- 
tennas. The first antenna 
installed was a half-wave 
dipole fed at the center 
with a 1:1 ratio toroidal 
coil balun and RC-11/U 
[75-Ohm) line. Since this 
antenna is not unusual in 
any way. it is not described 
here. 



The Extended Double Zepp 

The second reference 
antenna was the extended 
double Zepp with 5/8- 
wavelength elements. The 
design frequency for the 15 
meter experiments was 
213 MHz. Normally, the 
two 225*^ elements are 
each cut to a length equal 
(in feet) to 600/f, where f is 
in MHz. For 213 MHz, the 
elements LI and L2 are 
each 28 feet, 2 inches long. 
Element lengths for other 
frequencies may be calcu- 
lated or taken from Table 
1. 

In most handbooks, an 
open-ended stub is shown 
connected to this antenna 
at the center, as shown in 
Figl at "A'Mf the distance 
between the points 
"o"-''o" and "x"'"x" is 
equal to 1/8 wavelength, 
the impedance across the 
tine at the "x''-"x" points 
will be about 120 Ohms. If 
you make the open-wire 



stub 3/8-waveIength long 
from points 



o - o 



to 

points "z"-"z'\ you can ob- 
tain any value of im- 
pedance along the line as 
you move from the open 
end of the stub (very high 
impedance) toward the 
point where the stub con- 
nects to the antenna ele- 
ments (low impedance). 

Since you need to use an 
RC-8/U {50-Ohm) coaxial 
line and a 4:1 ratio toroidal 
coil balun to match the 
tine and antenna, you will 
find the appropriate 
200-Ohm impedance point 
down the stub from the 
antenna at 6 feet, 10 
inches. This point, marked 
'V"-'V' in Fig. 1, is correct 
for 21 3 MHz. For other fre- 
quencies, the distance be- 
tween points "o"-"o" and 
'-y'vy can be calculated 
from the formula in which 
the distance in feet equals 
145. 69/f, where f is in MHz. 

If you use RG-11/U 
[75-Ohm) line, the correct 



300-Ohm matching point 
will be a few inches further 
down the line in the direc- 
tion toward the open end 
It must be understood that 
these calculated points of 
attachment are intended to 
bring you within the ball 
park and, in some cases, 
may be exactly correct. 
However, the antenna 
must be resonated and 
matched as outlined be- 
low. The overall stub 
length for 21 3 MHz wilt be 
15 feet, 4 inches. For other 
frequencies, use the for- 
mula in which the distance 
in feet equals 326,52/f, 
where f is in MHz. 

The stub is constructed 
from two no, 12 copper 
conductors spaced 4 inch- 
es apart by means of 
porcelain spreaders. The 
two radiator elements are 
also made from the same 
size wire. Ordinary plastic- 
covered household elec- 
trical wire, obtainable at 
any hardware or electrical 
supply store, is suitable. If 
you cannot obtain the 
porcelain spreaders, use 
plastic rod or hardwood 
dowels to make the 
spreaders, In the "old" 
days, we used maplewood 
dowels and boiled them in 
linseed oil to prevent the 
absorption of moisture. 

Th€ Adjustments 

The antenna system may 
be easily matched and 
resonated for optimum 
performance if you follow 
each step in order as 
follows. 

Calculate the length of 
the two radiator elements 
and the matching stub 
from the formulas or select 
them from Table 1 , Cut the 
wires about 2 or 3 inches 
longer than the calculated 
lengths to allow for trim- 
ming adjustments during 
the resonating process. 
Connect the stub to the 
antenna elements as 
shown in Fig, 1. 

Calculate the distance 
of the 200-Ohm impedance 
point down the stub from 



the antenna. Once the 
point ts located, peel the 

insulation from the two 
wires for a distance of 
about 4 inches on each side 
of the calculated and 
measured point. The out- 
put terminals of the balun 
are connected to the two 
bare stub wires with flexi- 
ble leads not over 8 inches 
long and a pair of copper 
alligator clips. 

Connect an swr meter in 
series with the coaxial 
transmission line and the 
balun input terminal (test 
point "'A'O- Raise the anten- 
na at least 10 feet above 
the ground. 

At the transmitter end of 
the coaxial line, apply a 
2U MHz rf signal at a 
level of about 5 Watts. Ad- 
just the swr meter sensitivi- 
ty and/or the signal level 
until the swr meter in- 
dicator reads exactly full- 
scale ''forward/' Throw the 
swr meter selector switch 
to "reflected'' or "reverse." 
The reverse indication 
should be much lower than 
that obtained with the 
switch in forward position, 
but the indicator may not 
read zero. Move the two 
alligator clips up or down 
the bare stub wires to 
locate the point where the 
reverse swr indication is 
the lowest. 

The antenna should be 
pulled up to a half 
wavelength above ground 
while observing the swr 
meter reverse indication If 
it is inconvenient to read 
the swr meter indication 
when the antenna is raised, 
connect a half-wavelength 
piece of coaxial line be- 
tween the swr meter out- 
put terminal and the balun 
input terminal Use any 
type of coax for the half- 
wave section and any im- 



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Fig. t. Extended doubfe Zepp antenna with coaxial line 
feed. Cain = 3 dB over half-wave dipole at same height; 
f - megahertz. Dimensions for 21 3 MHz -^11 - 28T';L2 
^ 28'r'; '*'o''-'Y' {200 Ohms) ^ 6'W; "o""2" = 15'4"; 
adjust '*o"-''z" dimension and 'y positions for lowest swr 
at test point "A'' LI -2 — two 13-turn coils ^12 copper, 
Teflon^^ insulated bifilar wound on 2" powdered-iron 
core ( T'2). 



pedance, but make sure 
that it is exactly a half- 
wave long. If it is, the swr 
meter readings will be the 
same as when connected 
to a balun input. 

If you cannot obtain a 
complete null (zero indica- 
tion) on the swr meter in* 
dicator by adjusting the 
two alligator dtps, adjust 
the clips for the lowest in- 
dication. Now, trim an inch 
or so from the length of 
each radiator element and 
again adjust the alligator 
clips for a null The clip ad- 
justments are not very 
critical, but an inch or so 
removed from the radia- 
tors or the stub will have a 
very noticeable effect. By 



alternately trimming the 

radiator and stub lengths 
very carefully and sliding 
the alligator clips up and 
down the bare wires of the 
stub, you should be able to 
obtain a complete null on 
the swr meter indicator. 

A complete null or zero 
reverse reading indicates a 

perfect match between the 
line and the antenna feed- 
point, or an swr of 1:1, In 
our antennas, with a per- 
fect match at 21.3 MHz, 
the swr was not more than 
1.2:1 at the frequency ex- 
tremes of the 15 meter 
phone band. The final ad- 
justments are made so that 
the swr meter indicates 
zero reverse when the 



Frequency 



LI 



L2 



o-x 



3.750 MHz 


160^ 


160^ 


27.47' 


7,150 MH2 


84' 


84' 


14.41' 


14,175 MHz 


42.3' 


42.3* 


7.27" 


21.300 MHz 


28. ir 


28,17' 


4,84' 


28 600 MHz 


21.0* 


21.0' 


3.60' 



Table 1. These dimensions are for the antenna shown in Fig. 1 
text. 



o-y* 


o-z 


3B.85' 


87.0* 


20,38' 


45,67^ 


10.28* 


23.0* 


e.84' 


15-33' 


5.09' 


1 1 .42' 


* Adjust as required. See 




35 




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F/g. 2- Four-element array, Cain = 6.2 dB over a half-wave 
dipole at same height Dimensions for 21.3 MHz ^ LI = 
22'; L2 = 2T;L3 = 22'; L4 ^ 22';$ = 57-1/2"; stub (3/1 6k) 
= 8'5-1/r' between point ''q"-''o" and ''z"-**r'; 200 point 
= 24'' between ^'x"-"x" and "z"-"2". for otf^er frequen- 
cies, use the formulas. L1-2--13 turns each bifilar wound 
on 2" powdered-iron (T-2) core. Use #7 2 or §14 copper wire 
with Teflon insulation, Enclose it in a 2" X J" X 4'' metal 
box. 



antenna is suspended a 
half wave (about 23 feet 
for 21 3 MHz) above the 
earth. 

The Four-Element End-Fire 

Array 

Back in the "stone age" 
of amateur radio, this 
antenna was generally 
called an "8JK beam" after 
the amateur (John D, Kraus 
W8JK) who originated and 
publicized it in the 
technical journals. The ver* 
sion shown in Fig. 2 con- 
sists of four half-wave 
elements — LI, L2, L3, and 
L4. When the phasing sec- 
tion is connected as shown, 
elements LI and L4 will be 
excited in phase. Elements 



L2 and L3 are also excited 
in phase However, the cur- 
rents flowing in L1 and L3 
and the currents in L2 and 
L4 will be out of phase by 
180** (observe the instan- 
taneous polarity symbols 
in Fig. 2). 

This type of arrange- 
ment produces what is 
called an "end-fire" array. 
Maximum radiation will 
take place along a line 
through the plane of the 
radiators and at right 
angles to the four ele- 
ments. The pattern is 
bidirectional, and the gain 
over a half-wave dipole at 
the same height is about 
6.2 dB, Until now, the big 
drawback with this anten- 



na was that all published 
designs showed the use of 
cumbersome tuned feed- 
ers or 600-Ohm open-wire 
lines. In this array, the 
method of feed is even 
easier to adjust than that of 
the extended double Zepp 
antenna previously de* 
scribed. 

The four radiator 
elements must be exactly 
the same length. Use the 
half-wave formula in which 
length in feet equals 468/f, 
where f is in MHz. For 21.3 
MHz, each element is 21 .97 
(22) feet long. If the 
elements are cut precisely 
to this length and the array 
is erected exactly one-half 
wavelength above elec- 
trical ground, no ad- 
justments of the element 
lengths are necessary. The 
phasing harness conduc* 
tors PI, P2, P3, and P4 must 
be exactly equal in length. 
The distance from each 
stub connection point out 
to the element connection 
must be precisely the 
same, or the array will be 
unbalanced and incorrect- 
ly phased. Incorrect phas- 
ing will reduce the gain and 
may cause other problems. 
For stub design pur- 
poses, the distance from 
the stub connection on the 
phasing harness conductor 
to the element connection 
is considered to be 1/16 
wavelength The entire 
phasing harness is looked 
upon as two 1/16-wave- 
length transmission lines in 
parallel. Therefore, if you 
make the impedance 
matching stub equal to 
3/16 wavelength as shown, 
you can connect an ad- 
justable ''short circuit" 
(jumper wire) across the 
lower end of the stub and 
use it to resonate the array. 
Since the 1/1 6-wave length 
phasing harness plus the 
3/1 6-wave length stub 
equals 4/16 wavelength, or 
1/4 wavelength, the 
"shorted" stub will have a 
low impedance value at 
the bottom and a high im- 
pedance value at the top. 
As a result, you can obtain 



any impedance value by 
tapping across the stub at 
the appropriate point 
along the line. 

The 200-Ohm im- 
pedance point for the con- 
nection of the balun out- 
put terminals is about 24 
inches up the stub from the 
jumper wire. Again, I want 
to emphasize that the im- 
pedance connection points 
are only approximations. 
Bare the stub conductors 
and slide the alligator clips 
up and down for lowest swr 
indication in the coaxial 
line at test point ''A'\ If a 
complete null cannot be 
obtained with the alligator 
clip adjustments, move the 
jumper wire up or down 
the stub and readjust the 
clips until a reverse zero 
swr meter indication is ob- 
tained. Once the correct 
adjustments have been 
made, solder the jumper 
wire across the stub and 
clip off the unused ends of 
the stub At the balun con- 
nection, remove the alli- 
gator clips and solder the 
balun output leads directly 
to the stub conductors at 
the exact points where the 
clips were attached. The 
final adjustments should 
be made with the elements 
suspended a half wave- 
length above ground. 

Summary 

These antenna systems 
are actually much easier to 
adjust than the above 
description might indicate. 
The only test equipment re- 
quired is an swr meter and 
a low-power signal source 
whose frequency can be 
accurately controlled. The 
average Novice should be 
able to construct and ad- 
just these "beam" anten- 
nas if the instructions are 
carefully followed. The ex- 
tened double Zepp anten- 
na will effectively double 
your radiated power. The 
4-element job will give you 
an effective radiated 
power gain of four times. 
All references are to a half- 
wave dipole at the same 
height. ■ 



36 



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Deater Inquiries invited. \\ 



ntiisrer lii^i'ji 



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RESONATES YOUR TOWER 
ON 40, AND 80 ! 



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Lnnagiine using your 
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radiator on 40 and SO 
meters. It is common 
knowledge that a 
dipole or inverted-vee 
must be at least 1/2 
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Radials not necessary. 
No more hiiywire ap- 
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Stuart TOUIERTUnCR 
takes up virtually no 



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dipoles and TV's at 
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from ground level. 



Start mak 
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system that 
out. The' Stuart 
TOIll€» TUnCfi w 
handle 500 Ivatts out 

PUL 



Tg better 

the 40 

bands 

antenna 

eally gets 



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5 52 J B^ Oak Drive 
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1/£RTICAL 


Fig. 


h 


The 


T'L 


antenna. 






38 









endfed 



XX 



previous article* of 

mine described the 
T^ LT (Tuned Transmission 
Line Trap), its construction^ 
and its use to prevent feed- 
line radiation when used with 
a centerfed horlzontaf dipole. 
There are many applications 
for this unique device. The 
object of this article is to 
describe the use of the T^ LT 
to end feed either horizontal 
or vertical di poles. 

Fig. 1 shows a sketch of 
the T LT used to end feed an 
antenna. The coil is made of 
the shield of the coaxial feed- 
line* the capacitor is the 
value required to resonate the 
coil at the operating 
frequency. The number of 
turns in the coil may be as 
few as one. With a low 
number of turns, the reso- 
nating capacitor wilt be large, 
the high^ and the band- 
width narrow. The antenna 
performance increases with 
the Q of the T^ LT. 

The T LT operates in this 
application because of the 
ability of coaxial cable to 
simultaneously carry differing 
currents on the inside and the 
outside of the shield of the 
coax. UsuallVj a current 
flowing on the outside of the 
shield of a coaxial cable is 
undesirable. However, in this 
case, this outer current is the 



antenna current of one side 
of a half-v^ave dipole, and it is 



required for the unit to 
operate as a half- wave an- 
tenna. Fig. 2(a) shows the 
current distribution in a half- 
wave dipole, and Fig, 2(b) 
shows the corresponding 
current distribution in the 
T^LT endfed dipole. To 
behave as a half-wave dipole, 
the T^LT endfed antenna 
must have the same current 
distrubution on the outside 
of the coax shield as the 
dipole of Fig, 2(a). In partic* 
ular, this current must go to 
zero at the ends of the dipole* 
The end of the wire insures 
zero current at the far end of 
the half- wave antenna, but 
the characteristic of the cur- 
rent at the T^ LT end depends 
upon the impedance of the 

T' LT, 

Impedance is defined as 

the ratio of the voltage to the 
current. Since the current at 
each end of a dipole antenna 
is zero, the impedance at the 



h 



^n 



A 



4NTEttMi 



I ft ED LINE 




■C 



ilVNTEt^NA CURflEl^T 



A. 



RESOIHAT»NG 



X/1 



FEED L(^E 
CURftE?*lT QH\Jf 

imS4DE COAX I 



^ 




4NTENMA 
CUftREMT 
i OUTSIDE 
COAX} 



EEia 



ANTE UNA 
CURftEi^T 



FEED UWE CWWfftWTS 
(IMSiDE CIMJ() 



r*LT 



V 



m 



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m 



\y 



Fig. 2. Antenna current distributions, (a) Dipole currents, (b) 
T^ LT currents, (c) Equivalent connection — endfed dipole. 



ends of a dipoie antenna 
cannot be defined. The only 
impedance that can be 
connected between the end 
of a dipoIe antenna and 
ground^ without changing the 
current distrfbutlon of the 
antenna, is an infinite 
impedance. A parallel reso- 
nant tank circuit, theoreti- 
cally, has infinite impedance 
across its terminals. Real^ 
high-Q resonant tank circuits 
can have an impedance 
greater than 100,000 Ohms. 
A low-toss high^Q T^LT can^ 
therefore^ approach the de- 
sired infinite impedance. 

Fig. 2(c) shows, topo- 
logically, how the impedance 

of the T^LT is connected to 
one end of the half-wave 
dipoie antenna. Fig. 3 shows 
the radiated power, measured 
at a distance of 10 wave- 
lengths, from a 20, rneter di- 
poie as a function of the 
impedance con nected 
between ground and one end 
of the antenna. Here it can be 
seen that a very high imped- 
ance is required of the T^ LT 
if the antenna is to perform 



properly. 

Some authors^ '^'^'^ have 
described an endfed dipole 
with an rf choke instead of a 
T^ LT. These authors incor- 
rectly presumed that the 
impedance at the end of a 
half-wave dipole antenna was 
defined and was approxi- 
mately 4,000 Ohms, This^ 
however, is the impedance of 
a half-wave radiator fed 
against an ideal ground 
planc,*^ not the impedance at 
the end of a half -wave dipole. 
Fig. 3 indicates why these 
previously published designs 
of endfed dipoles have never 
become popular. 

On the contrary^ my T^ LT 
vertical antennas have given 
excellent DX performance. 
Using a 2-Watt HW-7 on 20 
meters, I consistently receive 
an S-8,9 report from VE6s in 
Calgary. That must be where 
the first skip lands. 

Captain Lee^ discusses the 
advantages of a ground- 
isolated vertical dipole but 
adds, "How one is to feed 
this antenna from a practical 






I. .DO 
,.90 
80 



a .50 

—I 

Ui 
Ui 

Ui 20 ;- 

jr. 



.\Q 







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Z - IMPEDANCE - QHM5 (REStSTIVE) 



F/g. 3, Field strength as a function of Impedance between 
dipole end and ground. 



Ptioto A, T^ LT of 10 meter vertical dipole. 



standpoint is never men- 
tioned/* I say, do it with a 
T^LT! TheT^LT-fed vertical 
is ground independent and 
thereby avoids the extensive 
ground system required for 
conventional verticals.^ This 
antenna permits DX perfor- 
mance when using battery- 
powered, portable — even 
QRP — equipment I have 
successfully used the T^ LT to 
feed shortened antennas, less 
than X /4 In length, which 
answers the height problem 
associated with a half- wave 
vertical. The shortened an- 
tenna requires an appropriate 
unbalanced to unbalanced 
impedance matching trans- 
former at the dipole center.^ 
Photos A and B show de- 
tails of a T^LT endfed an- 
tenna that was hastily con- 
structed for OSCAR down- 
link communications. The 
T^LT is simple to build, easy 
to adiust, and it outperforms 
conventional ve rtical 
antennas. ■ 

References 

^Stahler, A,F. "Catch Standing 

Waves/' 73 A^agazine, Holiday, 

1976. 

^Orr, Wm. I. W6SAI, "Simple 

Low Cost Wire Antennas for 

Radio Amateurs/' Fadio PubU- 

CBttons, inc. , 1 972, pp. 113-114. 

Orr, Wm. I. and Stuart D, 
Cowan, 'Tlie Truth About CB 
Antennas/* Radio Pubiica tions, 
inc., pp. 154-155. 

KuBck^n, ^uhn A. ^Antennas and 
Transmission Ltnes, Howard W. 
Sams & Co., 1969, pp. 248-253, 

Brueckman, H., "Theory and 

Performance of Vehicular Center- 
Fed Whip Antennas/' fR£ Trans. 
Vehicular Comm., Vol. VC'9, 
December, 1960, pp, 10-20. 

King, R., 777 e Ttieofy of Linear 
Antennas, Harv a r d U n i ve r s i t y 
Press, Cambridge MA, 1956. 

Lee, Paul H., The Amateur 



Radio Vertical Antenna Hand- 
book^ Cowan Pubtishing Corp., 
1974, pp. 17. 

^Sevick, J., "The W2FMI 
Ground-Mounted Short Vertical/' 
QST, March, 1973. 

Sevick, J,, '^ Broad bank 
Transmission Lir*e Matching 
Networks/' Present and Future 
Tr&nds in Communications Equip- 
ment Design, 20^3, I.E.E.E,, 
1976. 




Photo fi Electrical center of 
T^ LT vertical antenna. 



39 



Thomas Cirilh WA2UVC 
(Address withkeidf 
New York NY WO 10 



The Cliff-Dweller's 

Delight 

how to operate from an apartment 



For years, numerous 
hams have tried to 
solve the perennial prob- 
lem of the apartment- 
dwelling amateur and the 
severe restrictions on an- 
tenna design and effective- 
ness which result from his 
environment. 

Some of the more 
successful approaches 
have been published; how- 
ever, I have invariably 
noticed something pecu- 
liar about most of them. It 
seems that in an attempt to 
meet all of the apartment 
dweller's requirements {in- 
visibility, low cost, 
reasonable effectiveness, 
easily accessible materials, 
etc.I one finds a "hidden 
requirement/' This is often 
in the last sentence of the 
article, where the author 
indicates that 18-karat gold 
was used throughout due 
to its fine properties [in- 
cluding conductivity), or 
that the author's apart- 
ment shack is located a 
short distance from Mt. 
Everest. 

1 have been faced with 
these same problems for 
many years and have 
discovered a completely 
satisfactory solution which 
has been in use for approx- 
imately two years. The 
primary design consider* 
ation was inconspicuous- 

40 



ness, for getting involved 
with the landlord or super- 
intendent was out of the 
question. Although the 
other criteria were 
relegated to lower 
priorities, this approach 
does satisfy all of them. 

This antenna approach 
involves the use of a 
Hustler mobile antenna 
(and its associated 
resonators, for each band), 
horizontally polarized, 
working against the 
building as ground. 

Early experimentation 
indicated that a quarter 
wavelength antenna, hori- 
zontally polarized and 
working against the 
building as a ground plane, 
was surprisingly effective. 
However, at 20 meters and 
lower frequencies, antenna 
length becomes a pro- 
hibitive factor. These 
results, coupled with my 
experiences working 
mobile stations, led me to 
try the Hustler, It (or 
another similar antenna] is 
ideal. 

Mounting this antenna 
horizontally proved to be a 
reasonable challenge. At 
first, I used a swivel-type 
ball mount on a block of 
wood, swiveling the anten- 
na against the building 
when not in use. This was 
crude and caused me great 



concern about structural 
integrity! 1 then stumbled 
upon the Hustler quick- 
disconnect mount. Suc- 
cess! 

With the quick-dis- 
connect mount, the entire 
antenna and resonator can 
be removed and kept in- 
doors when not in use, 
satisfying my first criterion. 
I keep this quick- 
disconnect on a fixed ball 
mount, which is tn turn 
fastened to an aluminum 
miniboxCaboutr'x3"x3") 
permanently attached to 
my windowsill. The ground 
side of the antenna is con- 
nected to my metal win- 
dow frame, which, 
although smalL works 
quite well, 1 have also used 
a counterpoise with equal 
success. My swr is about 
1 .3 to 1 . 

How effective can this 
crude, inexpensive, expedi- 
tious "apartment dweller's 
beam" be? judge for your- 
self. My antenna is fed 
through fifty feet of ex- 
tremely lossy RC-58U and 
is driven by a TS-520, bare- 
foot, 1 spend little time DX- 
ing, yet still have been able 
to work about fifty coun- 
tries over a few months. 
Surprised? So was I; how- 
ever, consider the follow- 
ing: Before I had acquired 
the TS*520, my only rig was 



a Heathkit HW-7 (2 Wafts 
out) and I logged ten states 
tn just a few days using this 
same antenna! Prior to this 
antenna, DX meant work- 
ing Staten Island (I live in 
Manhattan). 

One other thing, Jf 
you're not comfortable let- 
ting the antenna '^dangle" 
by its mount, you can sup- 
port it further using nylon 
fishing line, fabricating 
non-metallic hooks for 
easy removaL 

Needless to say, the 
overriding advantage of 
this antenna approach is 
that it is removable. By 
simply opening your win- 
dow and twisting the quick- 
disconnect mount, it's 
gone. If you're daring, use 
it during the day. Other- 
wise, wait until the sun sets 
and fire up the rig. 

In summary, let me say 
that there is a tremendous 
difference between a 5 by 
7 from Queens NY and the 
sound of disbelief in the 
voices of the UKs and ZLs 
I've QSOed with recently 
when I've told them about 
my shack. 

Try it. This may finally 
be your way out of the 
apartment dweller's dilem- 
ma. (No, I don't live at the 
top of the Empire State 
Buildingl!!}H 



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Don Walters WABFCA 

2849 Verle 

Ann Arbor MI 481Q4 



Wait Till You Try 
16 Elements! 



15 dB gain on 2m is a real kick 



Operating on 2 meter FM, 
I needed a better anten- 
na than my little 4-element 
connmercial beann if I wanted 
to be able to put an accept- 
able signal into the WR8AAA 
146. 19-. 79 repeater in 
Milford, Michigan, a distance 
of about 30 miles from my 
new QTH. If the 4-element 
beam was up on a 40-foot 
tower^ 1 probably would not 
have any problems making it 
into the MItford repeater 
However^ I wasn*t ready to 
put up a tower yet t had to 
put up an antenna with more 
gain because the antenna 
would be mounted only 
about 20 feet above the 
ground. 

The next problem was 
money. I did not want to 



spend a lot of money on a 
m u I ti*e I e ment commercial 
beam. 

Well, if 1 wasn't going to 
buy a beam, I would have to 
build one. So I started look- 
ing through the ARRL 
Antenna Handbook and 
many an old ham magazine. 
Nothing I saw seemed to fit 
my needs. Either the mount- 
ing hardware of the antenna 
elements looked too com- 
plicated to fabricate, or the 
antennas were designed for 
300-Ohm feedline. Of course, 
300-Ohm feed tines can be 
dealt with with baluns^ but I 
wanted to use coax through- 
out^ since 1 wasn't worried 
about the dB or so I might 
lose through the coax cable, 

I finally found what I 



/^ 



AHf^HHO- ELEMENT 



i 




I in. H 



■ELEMENT MOUWTimS CLAMP 

f-^ Mn. ^ 



tLEMENT 

M0UIVTIN6 

CLAWP 




^ 



THREADED MaCHIWE 
SCREW 

FLAT WASHER 



2irT. 



f j^STAR LOCK WASHER 




i 



] 



ANTENMA eOOW 



'!i«*|lti« 



DH 



STAR LOCK WASHER 



I 

Fig, /. Antenna element mounting details. 



wanted in an article in 73 
Magazine, June, 1975.- The 
article described and even 
gave exact dimensions for 6- 
and 8-element 2 meter beams 
cut for operation at 146 
MHz. Their construction 
methods and materials were 
simple and low cost (coat 
hangers and PVC pipe). 

With a good design to 
work with, I could now 
tackle the materials problem. 
Our household always seems 
to be lacking coat hangers, so 
another antenna element 
material would have to be 
found. While visiting a local 
hardware store, I found some 
3/1 6-inch-diameter medium 
steel wire in a 50-foot coil for 
less than $3.00. While at the 



same hardware store, I also 
decided to use l-inch- 
diameter aluminum tubing 
for the boom, rather than use 
PVC pipe as was used by the 
authors of the antenna 
article. 

With antenna materials in 
hand, it was time to start 
building the antenna. The 
first problem was to 
straighten out the coiled wire 
and cut it up into the lengths 
of each one of the antenna 
elements of the beam. For 
the first couple elements, I 
used a heavy pair of diagonal 
cutters to snip off the anten- 
na element from the rest of 
the wire coiL With my hand 
cramping from cutting the 
wire, I decided that there 
must be a better way to cut 
the wire. After some thought, 
I decided to try a small tube 
cutter on the wire. This little 
tool turned out to work quite 
nicely and worked better 
than the diagonal cutters. 

With all the antenna 
elements cut to size, the next 
problem to overcome was 
how to mount the antenna 
elements to the boom, I first 
thought about drilling a hole 
through the center of each 
element and then bolting the 
element to the boom. How- 
ever, the single hole through 
the element seemed like it 
might not be very stable 
when mounted to the anten- 
na boom. After some more 
thought, I came up with the 
mounting clamp arrangement 
shown in Fig. 1. The clamps 



&AMMA MATCH SLIOER 

GAMMA MATCH ARM 
SOLDERED TO CONNECTOR 



(JAMMA MATCM 



SLIDER LOCK 



SCREW DRIVEN 
etEMEHT 



ANITEN-MA BOOM 





COAX CONNECTOR 



CO A)? CONNtCTOH 
MOUNTINfi BRACKET 



STAR LOCHJ WASHER 




■-W-I 

Fig, 2, Driven element — gamma match details. 



42 






Antenna element mounting damp. 



are made by cutting a 1-inch 
by 2-inch by 1/16-inch strip 
of aluminum and bending it, 
from the middle^ around the 
center of the antenna ele- 
ment Each one is clamped 
tightly around the antenna 
element by pressing the 
clamp^element arrangement 
in a vice. Once the clamp has 
been formed over the antenna 
element, a mounting hote is 
drilled in the top of the 
center of the flat portion of 
the clamp. The ho!e drilled in 
the clamp should be just large 
enough to accommodate the 
mounting machine screw. 
Each element of the antenna 
is fitted with an element 
clamp, including the driven 
element, which should be cut 
as one piece rather than two 
dipote quarter-wave pieces, as 
was described in the original 
article. 

Since a 10- foot length of 
1 -inch-diameter aluminum 
tubing is not too easy to find^ 
two shorter pieces can be 
joined together to form the 
10- foot boom, joining the 
two pieces of tubing can be 
done in several ways. How- 
ever, one of the better ways 
of doing it is to take a one- 
foot length of tubing of the 
same diameter and slice the 
tubing along its length. Then 
fold one of the sides along 
the cut under the other, 
which makes the tube 
diameter somewhat smaller 



than it was. Slide the length 
of tubing into one of the 
lengths of tubing to be joined 
until the smaller diameter 
tube is about halfway into 
the longer piece of tubing. 
Then slide the other half of 
the antenna boom over the 
smaller diameter tubing. Drill 
two holes through each end 
of the foined pieces of tubing 
so that the holes are spaced 
about four inches apart and 
are also drilled through the 
smaller diameter tubing now 
inside the boom pieces. Put 
machine bolts through the 
holes and tighten them down. 
The antenna boom is now 
assembled and rigid enough 
to be used for the antenna* 
As an alternative to an 
aluminum boom, a 10-foot 
length of 1 X 1 inch wood 
could be used for the boom 
after it is treated with several 
coats of varnish. 

The antenna went together 
easily and took about eight 
hours to make. Now the only 
problems to tackle are the 
ones that will undoubtedly 
show up (courtesy of 
Murphy), Sure enough, the 
first problem appeared after 
the antenna was put together, 
t had originally built the 
driven elements as two 
separate quarter-wave sec- 
tions, as per the design in the 
original article. Even though 
the driven element was of the 
proper length electrically and 




Driven element - gamma match arrange ment. 



physically, its swr was very 
high (about infinity to one). 
This seemed to indicate that 
the driven- element impedance 
was no longer about 70 
Ohms. A quick check with 
one of the local antenna 



design experts, Sam Brooker 
WB8RFA, via the local 
WR8ADH repeater, con- 
firmed that the dipole driven 
clement would not have a 
70-Ohm impedance when it 
was mounted with the rest of 




OfflvEW ELEMENT 




BAIiW* HATCH iO4U0£M£O 
TO COA* CO«lhECTOM 



'AKTEHWA BOCM 




ttAUMA MATCH ARU 






^•.||V4 WA^TCH SLlOCt 



Fig. 3. Driven element — gamma match deta/'/s. 



43 




The completed eight-element stacked antenna system 



the elements. So the drive n- 
element design would have to 
be ctianged. I decided to use a 
singte-piece half-wave driven 
element which used a gamma 
match for matching the feed- 
line to the antenna- Figs, 2 
and 3 give the details on the 
drivcn-element/gamma-match 
arrangement used in the 
antenna* The new driven- 
element /gamma- match 
arrangement worked well and 
had an swr of about LI :1 at 
146,52 MHz and stayed 
below 1.5:1 over the 
146,19-146.94 MHz fre- 
quency range. 

The next problem was 
how far apart should the two 



beams be — a quarter, a half, 
five^elghts, or a wavelength? 
A look through the ARRL 
Antenna Handbook and the 
VHF manuals didn't turn up 
any definite stand on what 
spacing to use. Experience 
came to my rescue again. 
Another conversation with 
WB8RFA helped solve the 
spacing question, as well as 
some questions on phasing 
harness lengths. It seems that 
Sam had run into the same 
sort of decisions and ques- 
tions when he put up his twin 
11*element beams. It seems 
that common practice is to 
space the beams a wavelength 
apart; the theory and exact 



reasons are beyond the scope 
of this article. Fig, 4 gives the 
details of the beam spacing 
and mounting arrangement I 
used. This mounting arrange- 
ment seems to work out well, 
since it has survived mild 
icing and winds up to about 
40 mph. 

Interestingly enough, the 
ARRL Antenna Handbook 
and VHF manuals had very 
little on the added problems 
of stacking beams. The publi* 
cations did mention open line 
feeders between arrays 
stacked at some optimal 



L'C6fi4/4}«CK» ItULtrHjES 0# 1/4 



K 



&«Srfl 



IS fc/4 *AV^LEI«etHSt 



spacing. All the VHF antenna 
systems I have seen used coax 
for the phasing harness 
between each antenna and 
down to below the rotor. 
Below the rotor, I have seen 
both coax and 300-Ohm open 
feedline used for the run 
down to the shack* However, 
I could not find any infor- 
mation on how to calculate 
the length of each leg of the 
phasing harness. As I have 
previously m e n t io n e d ^ 
WB8RFA also gave me the 
necessary details on how to 
calculate the length of each 
leg of the phasing harness. 
Fig. 5 gives the details of the 
phasing harness arrangement 
and the calculations for the 
phasing harness leg lengths. 
The length of each leg of the 
phasing harness is calculated 
by: (,66) (X/4) x odd mul- 
tiples of X/4. Since (,66) 
(X/4) at 1 46 MHz is short, the 
value must be multiplied by 
an odd number of quarter 
wavelengths in order for the 
phasing harness to be long 
enough to reach from each 
antenna's driven element, 
along the antenna boom, and 
back to the feed coax cable at 
the support pole at the rotor. 
In my stacked antenna 
system, I needed 5 quarter 
wavelengths for each leg of 
the phasing harness, in order 
to route the cable along each 
antenna to the center support 
pole and T-connector, My 
proof that the phasing 
harness works is that the swr 
didn't change when the 
phasing harness was hooked 



-«i<3i<n 



IS kf* WAVit€PH»THl£| 



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CQ4K BAffRCt OONMCCTOfI 



CO^X CABLE 



Fig^ 4, B-etement 2 meter antenna stacking details. 



Fig, 5, Phasing harness details for stacking two 2 meter yogi 
beams* 



44 



up, which probably would 
not be the case if there was a 
mismatch in the phasing 
harness, I would like to point 
out that, once the antennas 
are stacked, each antenna's 
gamma match shoufd be 
adjusted for minimum swr 
before the phasing harness is 
attached. 

Conclusion 

The antenna array (two 
stacked 8- clement beams 
vertically polarized) is doing 
the job It was built to dOj 
which was to put an accept- 
able signal into the 
146,1 9". 7 9 Mil ford repeater 
from my new QTH, even 
though ft is only 20 feet 
above the ground. Addi- 
tional ly, I now have extended 
simplex range so that 1 can 
move off a repeater fre* 
quency pair and rag chew 
with the locals running only 
low power {1 Watt). 

Since I have not run quan- 
titative tests on the antenna 
system, I am not too sure 
what my actual gain and 
front- to-back ratio are. How^ 
ever, I can guess. The original 
article claimed 12 dB gain for 
the eight-element beam, with 
a front-to-back ratio of 14 
dB. Assuming my antennas 
come close in performance to 
those of the authors, I should 
have about the same gain and 
front-to-back ratio for each 
antenna. Stacking beams is 
supposed to provide an addi- 
tional 3 dB of forward ^in, 
so my stacked beams should 
have a forward gain of about 
1 S dB. I tried putting a dipole 
and my commercial 4- 




View of the antenna system mounted on my QTH, 



element beam at the same 
height as the stacked beams 
and did a comparison of how 
well each would pick up the 
Mil ford repeater With the 
dipole, 1 could not key up 
nor receive the Milford re- 
peater. With the 4-element 
beam^ the Milford repeater 
signal was pushing the trans- 
ceiver's S-meter about 1/8 of 
the meter's full scale. When 
the stacked eight-element 
beams were hooked up to the 
transceiver, the S-meter went 
up to over 3/4 of the meter's 
full scale. I could key up the 
Milford repeater running 1 
Watt (10 Watts wdS needed 
for reliable communications, 
though), as well as receive the 



repeater almost full quieting. 
So my attempt at building 

beam antennas seems to have 
been success fuL 

Although I feet my con- 
struction materials and tech* 
niques produced a mechanl- 
cally better antenna than 
those of Anderson and 
Atkins, my costs were some- 
what higher, also. Each eight- 
element beam cost about 
$10.00, which is about $8.00 
more than using coat hangers 
and PVC pipe. The total cost 
of the stacked-beam system 
was about $30,00, which 
included the cost of each 
eight-element beam, the 
phasing harness nnaterialSi and 
the stacking support boom. 



This price, thoughp is much^ 
much cheaper than the cost 
for a comparable commercial 
eight-element stacked anten- 
na system. Additionally, my 
construction methods for the 
2 meter beams would be 
suitable for building beams at 
220 MHz and at 432 MHz. 

But, best of all, I suppose, 
is that it continuously amazes 
me every time I come home 
and look at the good-looking 
2 meter stacked beams on the 
roof of my house and realize 
that I made them. ■ 

Roference 

1, "Build an It dB Coatrack/' 
K^IV Anderson WBaDQC and 
Walter Atkins, Jr, WB0HK8, 73 
Magazine^ June^ 197&, page 111. 



c>orTT; 







from page 12 

realize just liow obnoxious It 
must seem when we rob the 
rest of the world's hams of 
precious band room with our 
elephantine ORO signals. 
And what do you lose when 



3 ! I e 1:^ h o u 

you go QRPp? Well, your sta- 
tion won't Impress the CBer 
down the street unless he's 
really got his head together. 
And you won't crash through 
the QRM the way you once did. 
And you will really have to "go 
with the flow" of skip condi- 



tions If you want to make the 
trip to DX land* Perhaps that's 
}ust too great a sacrifice. You 
decide. I'm not saying that 
there is anything intrinsically 
immoral about high power. It is 
simply out of step with today's 
attitudes about energy eff icien* 
cy. And the kind of operating 
that It seems to foster is simply 
unacceptable to hams of a 
gentler persuasion. 

Troy Weidenheimer WtROF 

Ballwin MO 

As editor, t get first crack at 
Troy. I've been the QRP route 
and / agree W&t it is fun. But 
/Ve also been the kilowatt route 
arid that's fun, too, if different. 



With fow power, you frequentty 
have to settle just for getting 
through for a fleeting minute or 
two . . . enough to get a QSL 
card. If this is your bag, fine. My 
own preference is to be able to 
talk at length with people in 
odd places snd get to know 
them a bit . . . to strike up 
friendships. The chances of do- 
ing this on 20m with 20 Watts is 
small . . . I ran that power for a 
few years, so I know about It. 

Another thing. When you are 
operating from remote areas, 
you find that radio conditions 
are such that you hear the big 
signal boys every night. The 

Cmttmuedon page 56 



45 



Dan Umb&rger W8ZCQ 
2753 Elliott Ave, 
Columbus OH 43204 



Working 15m 
With A 20m Beam 



by adding three more elements 



Every amateur knows he 
is going to lose an 
antenna system sooner or 
later. My "later" came in the 
form of a terrific thunder- 
storm on Easter Sunday, 
1974, The storm, brief but 
fierce, left the antenna 
system looking like a pop art 
creation. The top of the mast 
was bent 45"", the 20 meter 
monobander looked like it 
was trying a three-cushion 
moonbounce shot, the 10 
meter beam was twisted 90° 



on the mast, and parts of the 
1 5 meter beam were either 

blown away or pointed 
lengthwise with the beam. 

The 10 and 20 meter 
beams were not particularly 
damaged, but the 15 was 
"over the hilt." U did not 
take long to replace the drive 
pipe and reinstall the 10 and 
20 meter beams and I was 
back in operation on those 
bands. 

My first idea was to build 
a 15 meter beam from 




scratch, but I looked at that 

nice long boom on the 
Mosley A-203-C and it 
seemed to be performing no 
particular function other than 
holding the elements apart. 
Why not put the middle of it 
to work and let it support a 
1 5 meter beam? A look at the 
physics indicated it would do 
the fob if the mechanical 
weight and wind load were 
kept at a minimum. 

The primary considera- 
tion, and an absolute must, 
was that the addition of the 
15 meter beam could not 
reduce the effectiveness of 
the 20 meter beam! Being of 
the * Reverse engineering" 
type, t build first and design 
from the results. I was pre- 
pared to remove the 1 5 meter 
elements if there were the 
slightest ill effects on the 
operation of the 20 meter 
beam. Happily, this ^^s not 
necessary. The effects on 20 
were negligible. 

The mechanical details 
were no problem. The wind 
load factor dictated that the 
element diameter be kept as 
small as feasible, A check 
with the aluminum depart- 
ment of a metals supply 
house disclosed that ,058" 
wall thickness tubing was 
available in diameter incre- 
ments of 1/8" across a wide 



range and this tubing tele- 
scoped snugly into the next 
size. This is in 6061 *T6 alloy 
and is commonly referred to 

as "tempered aluminum." 
They demonstrated that it 
could be bent double and 
would spring right back into 
shape! Cautiously, I asked the 
price. It was selling for $4,51 
a pound. The wind load 
factor took on increased 
importance! The standard 
length is 1 2 feet. I decided on 
5/8'' for the center and 1/2" 
for the extensions. Three 
pieces of each would be 
required. I went home with 
my bundle of tubing and the 
project was under way. 

I dug into my antenna 
library and could find liltle or 
no reference to common 
boom antennas. I knew there 
were many factors involved 
after reading the work of 
Shankjin, Greenblumj and 
Gillison, relating to height, 
spacing, and element 
d iameter. The complexity 
threw me, I had about 
decided to start with the for- 
mulas in the antenna hand- 
book when the )une, 1974, 
QST arrived with the writeup 
on the Wilson Electronics 
DB-54 Duo- Band Antenna by 
W1FBY in it. I was quite 
amazed that their element 
lengths were considerably 



46 



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Notes 

1 . 2" X 67*" X 3^'^ Bakelite^^ box ^ Radio Shack stock 270 627, 

2. Small variable capacitor about 150 pF madium spacing, 

3. If boom diameter is other t*ian 2*\ drUI these holes to mate with the required U-bolts. 

4. Saw slot to depth of 1 %** to permit the screw to clamp the tubing tightly. 

5. Gamma match 26-5/8" for 2 element, 

6. Supports sawed from plate. If necessary to purchase, stock width is either 3" or 4"* 



Fig. h Conversion of the Mosfey A-203-C for 15 meter copabi/ttles. 



longer than those computed 
from the ARRL Antenna 
Handbook. Since spacing of 
elements was dictated by 
space available on the boom 
of the A-203-C, I decided to 
disregard the Wilson dimen- 
sions and use the figures 
calculated from the 1970 
edition of the ARRL 
Antenna Handbook for a 
starter with 23* 4-1/2" for 
the reflector, 22' 3-1/8^' for 
the driven element and 21' 
1-3/8'* for the director. 

Since spacing was to be 
determined by how far I 
could reach from the tower 
to attach the elements, I 
decided to try only two 
elements at the outset. With 
these two elements in place, 
it was found that resonance 



was not at 21,150 kHz as 
desired, but 21,025 kHz! 

Decisions! Decisions! The 
first impulse was to shorten 
the two elements, but better 
judgment prevailed and it 
was decided to add the 
direaor and see what the 
influence would be. With the 
director in place, the 
resonance had shifted to 
21,275 kHz! From past 
experience, I knew spacing 
had a pronounced influence 
on the resonant frequency of 
an array, but had no idea it 
would be so drastic! Yet, this 
was my first experience with 
a common boom, interlaced 
array. However, I concluded 
the dimensions for the Wilson 
DB'54 were acceptably 
accurate. 



Any doubts about the 
mechanical strength and per- 
formance were quickly put to 
the test. The elements were 
installed before noon. While 
eating lunch, the weather 
bureau cooperated beauti- 
fully and sent a real howling, 
shingle-ripping storm worthy 
of any antenna's mettle. It 
broke limbs from trees all 
over the neighborhood, but 
the converted A-203'C 
shrugged it off in a most 
matter-of-fact manner. 

The second test, that of 
performance, was provided 
by the Northern California 
DX Association's junket to 
Kingman Reef as KP6KR, 
After a local frontal system 
passed and static cleared 
enough to hear them, it took 



one hour, fifty-nine minutes 
to net them. Discounting 

local cockpit trouble, I con- 
sidered the time involved 
completely reasonable. Per- 
formance test passed A-OK! 
Not having range equip- 
ment to check the pattern, I 
had to settle for front to back 
and front to side. The perfor- 
mance as a 2 element did not 
look so good; it only had 10 
dB front to back and 30 dB 
front to side. With it func- 
tioning as a 3-element array, 
it showed 22 dB front to 
back and 38 dB front to side. 
This was below desired per- 
formance but acceptable. I 
feel that with range equip- 
ment and careful element 
adjustment, much better per- 
formance could be achieved, 



47 




Construction 

Element mounting clamps 
were drilled, sawed, and 
tapped. They were made 
from a solid bar of 6061-T1 
aluminum 1-1/4'" x 1/2" x 
12**. The 5/8*' element 
mounting holes and the #8 
holes were first drilled and 
the individual blocks sawed 
apart and sawed lengthwise 
through. The metal removed 
by sawing the blocks allowed 
a firm clamp on the elements. 
After sawing each block in 
hatf^ the upper haif was 
tapped 1/4" #20 and the 
bottom half was drilled out 
with a 9/32" drill to pass the 
1/4" mounting bolts. It is 
advisable to matchmark the 



I L9 



upper and bwer half of each 
of the brackets before sawing 
them in half in case you 
haven't drilled them too accu- 
rately. 

The element supports were 
sawed from a plate of 
6061'T1 aluminum 1/4" x 
17'* X 10-1/2". The size was 
dictated by available material 
on hand In checking with the 
aluminum supply house, I 
found bar stock is available in 
either 1/4" x 3" or 1/4" x 
4". Either would suffice. All 
holes were laid out and 
drilled. 

Next, cut the 1/2** x 12* 
tubing in the center. The 
director and driven element 



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Fig. 2 Swr ratio measurements an 2 J A! Hz beam on boom 
with Mosley A203C 



required no extension^ but 
the reflector required extra 
length. This was accom- 
plished with some 3/8" o,d 
tubing salvaged from an old 
TV antenna. While 1 was at it, 
I extended the driven efemeni 
also, in the interest of 
mechanical strength at the 
tap. 

How to fabricate a capaci- 
tor for the gamma match 
presented a problem. I 
recalled that the local Radio 
Shack stores stocked Bake- 
lite^M instrument boxes* t 
chose their stock #270627, a 
6^1 /4'' X 3-3 /4'' X 2" with 
aluminum cover that would 
house a 150 pF variable from 
my junk box. A hole was 
drilled to allow passage for a 
screwdriver to the shaft- 
After adjustment of the 
capacitor^ the hole was 
plugged. I used a 1/4" alu- 
minum rod for the gamma 
bar, but aluminum tubing 
would have worked equally 
well with appropriate modifi- 
cation to the gamma shorting 
bar* The capacitor box is 
bolted to the bottom of the 
element support. A bracket 
was fabricated to mount an 
SO-239 standard coax con- 
nector* It is mounted on an 
angle bracket fabricaled from 
scrap aluminum and has a 
5/8" x 6" strap riveted lo the 
angle and is secured to the 
boom by the '*U" bolts that 
mount the element support 
to the boom. A short length 
of the #1 2 copper wire con- 
nects the center connector to 
a bolt through the side of the 
gamma capacitor housing 
box, A generous application 
of General Cement Corona 
Dope (Glyptal^Mj serves as 
weatherproofing. 

Placement of Elements on 
Boom 

The location of elements 
on the boom was determined 
by how far I could reach 
from the tower. Experience 
had shown it wise to keep the 
driven elements separated as 
much as possible to keep 
interaction to a minimum, 
with reflector and director 
placed out as far as I could 
reach with safety belt 



extended. 1 was unable to 
attain the .1 wavelength for 
the director and ,15 for the 
reflector, so I had to settle 
for what I could get for 
spacing, I feel that improved 
performance could be 
attained with greater spacing 
and range adjustment of 
element length, but have 
reservations if improved per- 
formance would justify the 
effort in view of present 
success with the antenna 
operation. 

Adjustment of Gamma Match 

With gamma c/tpacitorand 
shorting bar set at random, a 
swr curve is plotted to locate 
the lowest swr point, disre- 
garding the overall swr 
picture. The resonance is indi- 
cated by lowest swr point. 
The swr meter is taken up the 
tower and connected at the 
antenna. A small signal is fed 
into the antenna at the 
resonant frequency and the 
gamma capacitor and shorting 
stub are adlusted for mint* 
mum swr. After adjustment, 
the swr was less than L5 to 1 
across the entire band. 

Hardware 

It is suggested that stain- 
less hardware be used if it ts 
obtainable. If not, non- 
ferrous hardware should be 
used. If neither is available, 
plated steel can be used with 
shortened life expectancy. If 
plated steel is used, fog it 
generously with clear plastic 
acrylic spray. ■ 

References 

AHRL Antsnaa Handbook, 1970 
and 1974 editions. 
"Wilson DB-&4 20 and 15 Meter 
Duo-Band Beam/* WIFBY, QST, 
Jun©, 1974, page 40. 

Material 

3 PCS. S/ff' X 1Z^ X .0B8 6061 -T6 

aluminum tubing 

3 pes. 1/2** X 12 X .058 6061 76 

aiummum tubing 

1 PC, 1/2" X M/Z" X 1Z' 

6061-T1 aluminum bar stock 

1 pe. IM" X 3" X &^-6" 6061 -T6 

aluminum bar stock 

1 e-1/4" X 3-3/4" X 2" Radio 

Shack Bakelite box, stock 

#270-627 

6 ea. 1-1/2 pipe (2** i.dj "U*' 

bolts 

1 lot miscellaneous hardware, a 

PC. of V K 1/4" X 4" aluminum, 

and capacitof from junk box 



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Fig, /* Flexible method of passing antenna cables Into a house. 




It was now October^ and 
almost everything had 
found its niche in our new 
house. It was now time to set 

up the ham gear. But how to 
run the antenna cables into 
the laundry room, or I mean 
ham shack, without a lot of 
work looked as if it would 
take some time to figure out. 
Although there have been 
several methods published for 
running antenna cables into a 
shack, none seemed to be 
flexible enough for my needs. 
That is^ being a careful 
planner, nothing stays static 
in my ham shack for very 
long. So 1 needed a very 
flexible way of running an- 



tenna cables into the ham 
shack. 

While wandering around a 
locaf department store, I 

found myself in the plumbing 
supplies department- White 
looking at some plastic PVC 
pipe, I suddenly realized that 
the 114-inch diameter 90° 
elbow I was looking at was 
the solution to my problem. 
Using the elbow, I could 
route several cables into the 
house and still add a cable or 
two more, PL- 2 59 connector 
and a!L 

Fig, I and the accom- 
panying photographs detail 
how the 90° elbow is 
mounted on the house. If the 




Outside view of the 90"" elbow installed with an antenna aible Inside-of-house view of the 90"" elbow and the cables routed 
already routed through. through it into the house. 



m 



house has a basement or 
lower level {like a bj- or tri- 
level), the hole for the elbow 
can be cut, with an appro- 
priate size holesaw, so that 
the hole ts cut through the 
center of the outside wall 
floor ioist and between any 
interior floor joists which 
may be attached to the out- 
side floor joist The elbow is 
then coated with quick- 
setting epoxy around the 
tapered end and is inserted 
into the hole on the outside 
of the house with the elbow 



opening pointed down. Once 
the epoxy has cured, the 
elbow can be lightly sanded 
and then painted to match 
the color of the outside of 
your house. 

To keep insects out, either 
a wooden plug with cutouts 
for the cables around the 
plug's edge or a piece of 
lightly oiled stee! wool can be 
pushed up into the mouth of 
the elbow. Either way, use 
something to plug the mouth 
of the elboWj or you and 
your spouse will be con- 



tinuously surprised by the 
number of creepy crawl ies 
and flying thingles that will 
find their way into your 
house (and ham shack) 
through the unplugg^ 
opening of the elbow. 

This method of routing 
antenna cables into the house 
has worked out quite well for 
me over the past several 
months, especially whenever I 
wanted to route another coax 
cable into the house. Also, if 
we should move, the PVC 
pipe elbow can just be capped 



with a PVC pipe plug or I 
could take out the elbow and 
put a wooden plug into the 
hole, filling in any cracks 
with plastic wood. Then sand 
and paint the repair spot, 
which should then look like 
there was never a piece of 
pipe mounted there. Addi- 
tionally, this is a simple 
2-hour project (depending on 
how your house was built) 
that is inexpensive (abotft' 
$100 for the PVC 90^ elbow 
and epoxy) and not all that 
hard to do. * 





KJp^^H 







fmmpagff 10 

making it possible for me to see 
what 1 want lo see when I want 
to see it. and to hell with the 
network schedulers. They run 
the Jean Shepherd shows at 
the darnedest hours, so I tape 
'em. Jean, who is K20RS. and 
an old, old friend, has a wonder- 
ful sense of humor. He keeps 
threatening to write a series for 
73, but each time he goes off on 
some other foolish tangent . . . 
like his current TV series, 
"Shepherd's Pie/' shown on 
PBS. You've probably seen 
"Jean Shepherd's America" 
many times, or his "Phantom of 
the Open Hearth" film on PBS. 
Through the VTR, Shep^s 2 am 
programs are available while I 
eat dinner. Sorry about that, 
Cronkite. 

WHArS WJTH THE COVER? 

There isn*t any one simple 
answer to thrs. Part of it is that i 
got fed up trying lo think of dif- 
ferent covers after seventeen 
years of frustration and dead- 
lines. Sure, we plan ahead: 
"Hey. Wayne, the magazine 
goes to the printer this after- 
noon. What do you want on the 
cover?" 

Another part has been the 
success of the KUabaud 
covers, where we've put the 
table of contents on the cover. 
The one thing that makes 73 
really different from all of the 
other ham magazines is the 
quantity and variety of articles 
published, I counted up the 
number of feature articles 
published in 73 vs. OSTIast year 
and found 429 in 73 as opposed 
to 164 in QST, and \ had to 
count a lot of public service 
type articles in OSrto even get 



EDlTOBtAL BY WA YNB GREEN 

that number I wanted to get 
across the idea to newcomers 
that 73 is more like an ongoing 
encyclopedia of amateur radio 
than just a magazine. A year 
after pubticatjon, about 90% or 
more of the magazine m still as 
good as new, while OSr with 
its acres of operating news, is 
as dead as yesterday's news- 
paper. 

I'm open for ideas. Frankly, I 
don't think much of the 0S7 ap- 
proach lo covers, nor do 1 like 
the HR covers. QST, which is 
put together by a committee, 
iooks like it Is put together by a 
committee. HR manages to 
look exactly the same no mat- 
ter how little they change. CQ, 
for those of you who have seen 
it, looks amazingly like Pop- 
ironies, Radio Electronics, 
Elementary Electronics, 
Popular Science, Popular 
Mechanics, and the rest of the 
popular tribe. Blah, 

So, until someone comes up 
with something belter in the 
way of an idea for the cover, 
we'll make do with a dash of 
color on top and the index to 
the articles. I have nothing 
against color covers; I'm just 
tired of trying to think them up. 

WANT TO WRITE A BOOK? 

There is little in amateur 
radio that can compare with 
having your name on a book. 
That beats making the Honor 
Roll, five band DXCC, and all 
those things. When you have 
your own book published^ it 
puts you in a special class, for 
very few amateurs are so much 
of an authority on a subject 
that they can write a book. 

But let's say that you are an 
authority and you have a book 
in you dying to come out and 



wow the world. Where should 
you turn for a publisher? There 
are dozens of publishers of 
technical books, and It is 
bewildering to the new writer. 
Actually, your choices are quite 
limited. Sure* there are tols of 
publishers, and there are lots of 
poor authors, too. If you have a 
little better understanding of 
the role of a publisher, you will 
be better able to make a choice* 

A publisher has two func- 
tions for the writer. Firstly, he 
provides the money it takes to 
get a book set in type» made 
ready for printing, and then 
printed and bound. The money 
required for this is beyond the 
average author. To give you an 
idea of the magnitude of money 
involved, just the printing and 
paper bill for one issue of 73 
comes to well over $65,000, 
never mind the cost of setting 
the type, proofreading, pasting 
ui;^ the pages, getting the dia- 
grams drafted, the photo- 
graphs made and produced in 
halftones, etc. The whole pro- 
cess runs considerably over 
$100,000 per month. 

Getting the book printed is 
something almost any pub- 
lisher can handle. The second 
function is the important 
one . . , distribution. This is 
where you separate the pub- 
lishers. In this field, magazines 
have a tremendous advantage 
over other publishers since 
they have extensive distribu- 
tion for the magazines all set 
up and running. They also have 
It a lot easier when it comes to 
running ads for a book, a whole 
lot easier. Magazine advertis- 
ing is not trivial , , . ask any 
manufacturer. With ads run- 
ning from $1500 a page to oyer 
$3000 in the electronics maga- 
zines, advertising can be a 
deadly expense for book 
publishers, yet where else can 
they go to sell their books? Few 
books make it very far without 
advertising. 

With over a dozen books cur* 
rently in publication and many 
more in the works, 73 has a very 
good distribution system, and 



the advertising. Thus, if you 
have a book which might in- 
terest amateurs or computer 
hobbyists, you can do a lot 
worse than contact the 73 book 
department, 73 can get your 
book into print and be sure it is 
in most of the radio stores and 
technical book stores, plus of- 
fer a substantial mail-order 
sale through Radio Bookshop. 
Get in touch and start those 
nice royalty checks coming, 

FEBRUARY WINNER 
J. M. Mendeison W6AQM 
walked away with February's 
SI 00 prize for the best article. If 
reader support for antenna ar- 
ticles like "Can A Miniature 
Antenna Work?" is any indica- 
tion, this, our June antenna 
issue, should be a winner. 
Remember, your ballot Is the 
reader service card at the back 
of the magazine — use itl 

CLUB NEWSLETTERS 
NEEDED 

Every now and then a 
manufacturer comes up with 
an idea which will benefit ham 
clubs and is interested in get* 
ting a list of clubs which have 
newsletters as a way to let 
clubs in on the special deal 
When I hear of something 
which would rea!ly benefit ham 
clubs, rd Jike to have a mailing 
list of all of the clubs with 
newsletters in order to pass 
along this information so these 
clubs can benefit. Sand a copy 
of your club bulletin to Wayne 
Green, 73 Magazine. Peter- 
borough NH 0345B, 

DALLAS IN JUNE 

It's been far too long since 
there has been a first-rate 
hamfesl in Dallas. You can bet 
that I'm looking forward to get* 
ting back to Dallas for the 
hamfest on June 17'18th. 

The hamfest will also be 
heavy with microcomputer ac- 
tivities and exhibits, so it 
should be a lot of fun, The 
whole works will be at the 

Continued on page 187 



51 



Resurrecting 
the Beverage Antenna 



try this 55-year-old, 
low-noise, lowband antenna 



BUtSmiih W5USM 
Rome 2, Box 22SI 
McKlnney TX 75069 



One can derive con- 
siderable satisfaction 
from the friendly, leisurely- 
paced contacts often 
found on the 160 meter 
band, contacts which 
sometimes may be set up 
simply by erecting an in- 
verted L or drpole antenna 
and using it both to trans- 
mit and to receive. More 
than likely, though, sooner 
or later the 160 meter 
operator begins searching 
for methods of reducing 
the level of man-made and 
atmospheric noise pre- 
dominant on 1.8 MHz. The 
simplest solution is to 
place near the operating 
position a receiving loop 
antenna, which may be 
rotated to " null out'' noise 



52 



sources or interference 
from nearby stations while 
the outside antenna con- 
tinues to be used for 
transmitting. 

The loop will solve many 
receiving problems, and 
may well be the only such 
antenna used to satisfy the 
needs of the user. On the 
other hand, a good loop 
may whet the appetite for 
an even better receiving 
system. On 160 or 80 
meters, the answer is likely 
to be a Beverage antenna, 
named after its primary 
developer, H. H Beverage 
W2BML Beverage wrote a 
now classic paper on the 
wave, or Beverage, anten- 
na which appeared in the 
November, 1922, issue of 
QST. Even after more than 
five decades, his article re- 
mains the gospel of Bev- 
erage theory and practice. 
If low-noise receiving 
antennas interest you, lo- 
cating a copy of the article 



is a must 

This article wilt dwell 
not upon the theory, how- 
ever, but rather on the 
practical construction of 
Beverage and Beverage- 
type antennas for low 
noise reception on 160 and 
80 meters. 

Like most topics in 
amateur radio, there are as 
many opinions on how to 
construct an effective 
Beverage antenna as there 
are those offering them. 

The substance of this ar- 
ticle is drawn from more 
than two years of collect- 
ing articles and opinions 
and using this type of 
antenna. Although we are 
going to describe an anten- 
na that requires a fairly 
large amount of real estate 
if constructed in true 
Beverage form, a satisfac- 
tory Beverage-type anten- 
na can be built on a small 
lot and still provide low 
noise reception and a 



degree of directivity. 

Admittedly, there are 
other ways to construct a 
Beverage antenna than 
those given in this article, 
but the ones here are likely 
to be the easiest and most 
foolproof. 

What Is A Beverage? 

In the most simplistic 
terms, a wave or Beverage 
antenna is a single straight 
length of wire at least one 
wavelength long viewed as 
a feedline, with one side 
the wire and the other side 
Earth, 

Just as with a feed line, 
there is an impedance be- 
tween the wire and the 
Earth. This impedance 
stays reasonably constant 
along the length of the 
antenna and with frequen- 
cy. The antenna may 
therefore be used over a 
wide frequency range; a 
Beverage designed for the 
1,8 MHz band will perform 



COAX FEED* 



J 



^ 



\ TO 3 w*ve: lengths 



^--** IJ UP T^(s tj p^^ET 




T0WAITD5 OESmCD 



_^ |; 4 00 -BOO OHiiS 



GROuftia System 



EARTH 



{^ 



fiAOimE) STSTEil 



ffg. 7. BdiS'xc Beverage antenna. Value given fortermmation 
resistance is approKtmate for normally conducting soiL 
Adjust as described in text Preamplifier maybe inserted at 
feedpoint. This is a terminated unidirectional Beverage 
with maximum response to signals arriving from the ter- 
minated end of the antenna. Signal voltage increases as 
radio wave sweeps the length of the antenna from right to 
left. Signals arriving from the left and traveling to the right 
are dissipated in the terminating resistor. See text for 
description of ground system. *See text for details of feed- 
point matching. 



well at 3,5 MHz. 

For the Beverage anten* 
iiaA to be directional, and 
obtain maxinnunri gain off 

the end of the antenna op- 
posite the feedpornt, the 
Beverage must be termi- 
nated to ground through an 
impedance equal to that 
between the wire and 
Earth, In other words, the 
non-fed end is grounded 
through a carbon resistor. 
If you wish to receive off 
both ends of the antenna, 
omit the termination and 
let the far end float. There 
are ways to use a single 
Beverage for reception in 
either direction through a 
more-or-leS5 complicated 
phasing system. This is 
beyond the scope of this 
article. For this informa- 
tion, the reader is directed 
to the June. 1977, QST 
article by Barry Soothe 
W9UCW, entitled, "Weak- 
Signal Reception On ISO- 
Some Antenna Notes." The 
articfe is excellent and well 
worth reading. 

A Beverage antenna 
receives the most response 
from signals arriving off 
the end{s) of the wire, not 
from broadside. The inten- 
sity of the signal builds as it 
travels along the length of 
the wire, reaching the max- 
imum for a given length at 
the end(s). A Beverage 
erected in an east/west 
direction receives maxi- 
mum signal energy from 
these directions. 

In our east/west exam- 
ple, maximum signal 



energy arriving from the 
east is dissipated in a load, 
in this case the receiver, 
while signals arriving from 
the west are mostly dissi- 
pated on the east end 
through another load, a ter- 
minating resistor. The 
closer the termination 
resistor fs in value to the 
impedance of the antenna, 
the more complete the 
dissipation of the west- 
arriving signal and the bet- 
ter the front-to-back rejec- 
tion. See Fig. 1. 

This is true in a ter- 
minated Beverage. A simi- 
lar antenna left with the 
non-fed end floating (not 
terminated) will reflect 
signals back down the wire 
from the floating end to be 
dissipated in the receiver. 
In this case, much of the 
directivity of the antenna, 
if that is what is desired in 
addition to low noise, is 
destroyed, although signal 
intensity arriving broad- 
side will still be reduced. 
See Fig. 2 

Some directivity of 
Beverage-type antennas 
will be noted with lengths 
as short as one half of a 
wave, but directivity be- 
comes much more pro- 
nounced in true Beverages 
one wave or more long. 

Logically, one might ex- 
pect that the longer the 
Beverage, the better. This 
is not true. For reasons that 
wifl not be discussed here 
(see the original article by 
Beverage), it is possible to 
make the antenna too long. 



/ff 



Fig. 2. This Beverage is similar to Fig. 1, but is not ter- 
minated. Signal response is nearly equal off either end, but 
slightly favors the non-fed end. Short, Beverage-type 
antennas are similarly constructed; see text 



A Beverage of one to three 
wavelengths long is ideal; 
in the case of 160 meters, 
this is 550 to 1600 feet, A 
length of 800 to 1000 feet 
will give good perfor- 
mance on both 160 and 80 
meters. 

Short Beverage-Type 

Antennas 

Thus far we have dealt 
with Beverages of some 
physical length. Available 
real estate and other con- 
siderations may preempt 
such construction, 

A true Beverage is physi- 
cally long, as explained, 
but don't rule out some 
Beverage advantages in 
short Beverage-type anten- 
nas. Although you will not 
achieve the gain and direc- 
tivity of a true Beverage^ 
you can still have the Bev- 
erage characteristic of low 
man-made and atmospher- 
ic noise pickup by con- 
structing an antenna as 
short as 100 feet using the 
methods given in this arti- 
cle. See Figs, 1 and 2. 

I have obtained good 
results from Beverage-type 
antennas as short as TOO 
feet laid upon the ground. 
Laying the wire upon the 
ground has the effect of 
decreasing its velocity fac- 
tor—and therefore reduc- 
ing the physical length for 
a given electrical wave- 
length. 

As an example, in winter 
1 have used a Beverage- 
type antenna 250 feet long 
laid upon the ground tn an 
east/west direction. The 
antenna is terminated to 
ground on the eastern end 
through a 50-Ohm resistor. 
The antenna exhibits low 



noise and some directional 
pattern. From north central 
Texas, the pattern covers 
about 90 degrees, 45 de- 
grees on either side of its 
axis. W4s and Caribbean 
stations within the pattern 
are typically 10 to 12 dB 
stronger than 8s, 9s, or 0s 
located mo re -or- less 
broadside to the antenna, 
referenced to a receiving 
loop. Stations to the west 
and northwest are very 
poor copy on the Bev- 
erage-type antenna. 

The antenna does not 
have the directivity or gain 
of a similar antenna 1200 
feet in length, but the 
shortwire is better than a 
loop and much, much bet- 
ter on noise rejection than 
my quarter-wave transmit- 
ting antennas. 

There is no reason why 
similar antennas cannot be 
tried on city lots, laid upon 
the ground or suspended 6 
feet or so in the air, 

I should add that I am of 
the opinion that anyone 
who takes seriously his 
ability to hear well on 160 
or 80 meters cannot pos- 
sibly have too many recefv- 
ing antennas ready to 
select at the flip of a 
switch. At the moment, I 
have available no fewer 
than 7 separate receiving 
antennas, including 3 loops 
and 4 Beverage or Bev- 
erage-type antennas, and 
none of them shows 
behavior identical to 
an others! 

Height Above Ground 

One of the interesting 
characteristics of the Bev- 
erage antenna is that it 
does not have to be lo- 



ss 



cated very far above 
ground and, in fact, may be 
laid upon the ground. 

There are rather com- 
plex formulas relating 
several factors used to 
compute height above 
ground. In practice, how- 
ever, a height high enough 
to permit passage of per- 
sons, animals, and vehicles 
below the antenna is a 
good choice. A height of 6 
to 12 feet over ''normally" 
conducting soil is an ex- 
cellent choice. The imped- 
ance of the antenna 
changes very little be- 
tween 6 and 12 feet. 
Greater heights will in- 
troduce unwanted noise 
pickup. See Table 1 for the 
antenna impedances for 
various heights above 
ground and wire sizes. 

Regarding the wire itself, 
most any size may be used 
as long as it will support its 
own weight. The wire may 
be uninsulated if erected 
above ground, or insulated 
if laid upon the ground. 

The wire may be sup- 
ported in any number of 
ways, but if metallic sup- 
ports are used, the wire 
should be insulated from 
them. Examples of sup- 
ports are metal or wood 
fence posts, V x 1" wood 
stakes, convenient trees, 
and the like. The wire 
should be run at a nearly 
constant height above 
ground and in a straight 
line not varying more than 
10 degrees. If the antenna 



crosses a gully, it should be 
run down into the gully at a 
nearly constant height 
above ground. 

We have mentioned 
previously the possibility 
of actually laying the 
Beverage upon the ground. 
This has been tried by me 
and many others with ex- 
cellent success, but it 
should be done in untrav- 
eled areas, for obvious 
reasons. 

I tive in an area of the 
country which is said to 
have excellent soil conduc- 
tivity. There are those 
Beverage experimenters 
who say that in such areas 
it may well be an advan- 
tage to lay the Beverage 
wire upon the ground. 1 can 
neither prove nor disprove 
this. I have used Beverages 
both on the ground and up 
to six feet above ground 
without noticing any per- 
formance changes. 

If the Beverage is laid 
upon the ground, obvious- 
ly you will use insulated 
wire. If you choose to ter- 
minate the antenna, I 
would suggest doing so 
directly to ground or 
through a 50-Ohm resistor: 

Providing Termination 
Ground 

Undoubtedly the most 
difficult and uncertain 
construction aspect of an 
unidirectional terminated 
Beverage antenna is the 
ground itself. 

While some Beverage 



Height of Wire 


4' 


a' 12' 


Wire Size » 


Ohms Impadance 


10 


460 


493 620 


12 


474 


507 534 


14 


488 


521 548 


16 


502 


535 562 


16 


516 


549 576 


20 


530 


563 590 


22 


544 


577 604 


24 


558 


591 818 



Table 1. Impedance of Beverage antenna as a function of 
wire size and height of wire above ground. These values 
will vary some minor amount due to local soil conditions. 
You can also expect variations from day to day and season 

to season. The proper terminating resistance can be deter- 
mmed as given in the text, or an adequately close value for 
most locations can be selected from this chart. 



users will argue that the 
ground is problematical at 
best, it can be clearfy 
demonstrated that the 
proper selection of the ter- 
minating resistor in con- 
junction with the ground 
does have a definite effect 
upon the directional char- 
acteristics and the rejec- 
tion of unwanted signals 
from the rear of the 
Beverage- 
Even though the Bev- 
erage antenna may per* 
form best when erected 
over poorly conducting 
soil, this same soil also 
accounts for more difficul- 
ty in grounding the ter- 
minated end But unless 
you can ground your 
Beverage through a single 
stake in salt water or a 
marsh, it remains worth- 
while regardless of soil 
conductivity to establish 
the best possible ground 
connection* 

A single ground stake 
may be sufficient under 
the above mentioned con- 
ditions, but seldom will 
such conditions exist. So 
how is a low resistance 
ground establishedf 

The answer Is to put in 
contact with the soil the 
most practical amount of 
metal possible. Probably 
the minimum ground ac- 
ceptable is a system of 
three copper ground rods 
as long as possible driven 
into the soil, spaced a 
minimum of two feet apart 
and bonded together. The 
bonding may be done with 
automobile battery 
grounding straps or with 
the shield removed from a 
discarded length of RC-8 or 
similar cable. Do not rely 
upon the clamps provided 
with the ground rods. 
Solder or braze all connec- 
tions, first making sure the 
rods and strap material are 
free of grease, paint, or 
whatever. The same ap- 
plies before driving the 
ground rods into the soil. A 
torch will be necessary to 
provide enough heat for 
proper bonding. 

An indication of ground- 



ing quality can be deter- 
mined from whether the 
termination resistor value 
changes as more ground is 
provided. If it does, you 
need more grounding or 
metal in contact with the 
soil. At some point you ob* 
viously reach a practical 
limit, but you should try to 
achieve the least possible 
change in the termination 
impedance. Proper deter- 
mination of the correct 
resistor value is made by 
observing the strength of a 
signal arriving from the 
rear (fed end) of the anten- 
na and selecting a resistor 
value which provides the 
deepest null or rejection of 
that signal. An AM broad- 
cast station is a good signal 
source for this adjustment. 
Here is an application 
where a carbon potentiom- 
eter is useful for the ter- 
mination resistor [as op* 
posed to fixed-vafue car- 
bon resistors). 

What we are attempting 
to establish is the lowest 
possible resistance to 
Earth. Three ground rods 
provide 1/3 the resistance 
to ground as a single rod, 
and therefore a three times 
better ground connection- 

In extremely poor soil 
conductivity areas, an 
elaborate ground system 
will be useful. Such a 
system was described 
by Roger Hoestenbach 
W5EGS in his December, 
1976, QST article entitled, 
"Improving Earth-Ground 
Characteristics/' This arti- 
cle is recommended read- 
ing. 

A technique similar to 
that described by Hoesten- 
bach would be to bury an 
old auto radiator obtained 
at low cost from a junk- 
yard. A grounding strap 
should be bonded to the 
radiator, and the radiator 
filled with a heavily- 
concentrated brine solu- 
tion. The brine solution is 
made by dissolving as 
much rock salt as possible 
in the quantity of water re- 
quired to fill the radiator. 
The rock salt used in water 



54 



softeners is an inexpensive 
source. 

A similar brine solution 
may be poured on the soil 
around the ground rod 
system, but remember that 
the brine solution will kill 
all plant life for some area 
as it leaches into the soiL 
The condition will exist for 
several years. Repeat the 
brine solution application 
as needed, probably once 
every 30 to 90 days. 

Wire mesh or screen also 
may be buried a few 
inches in the ground, 
equipped with a suitable 
bonding strap. 

Another method of pro- 
viding a low-resistance 
ground is through the use 
of a radial system extend- 
ing away from the Bev- 
erage. Do not run the radial 
wires back towards the 
Beverage. The radials 
should be made of unin- 
sulated wire, with the ends 
staked to ground througll 
metal stakes as long as you 
wish. A larger number of 
short radials is better than 
a lesser number of long 
radials. Sixteen radials 
about 55 feet long, fanned 
about 1 1 degrees apart and 
distributed over the 180 
degrees off the end of the 
Beverage, would be ideal. 
If this is impracticalp use as 
many radials as possible 
(even though they may be 
but a few feet long each) 
fanned over the 180 de- 
grees. Treating the soil with 
the brine solution may also 
be useful. 

Providing a low-resis- 
tance ground may be car- 
ried to whatever extreme 
the builder wishes, but the 
point is to provide the best 
possible ground circum- 
stances permit. 

Similar grounding tech- 
niques must be used at the 
fed end of the Beverage 
where the shield of the 
coaxial cable is bonded to 
the ground system. This 
will prevent random signal 
pickup on the coaxial 
feedline, pickup which will 
destroy the entire Bev- 
erage antenna system by 



upsetting the directional 
characteristics, 

This ground system busi- 
ness may seem like a lot of 
trouble and work, but the 
effort expended may be 
the difference between a 
mediocre receiving anten- 
na system and one that will 
provide many enjoyable 
hours and the ability to 
hear the weak ones your 
competition does not. And 
whether you choose a ter- 
minated unidirectional 
Beverage or a bidirectional 
one (with no termination), 
be sure to provide a ground 
system for the coaxial 
cable at the fed end, even 
though it may be as un- 
elaborate as one or more 
ground rods. 

Feeding the Beverage 

Ideally, the Beverage, 
like any antenna, should 
have its feed point matched 
to the feed or transmission 
line. Physically, it is unlike- 
ly that you will be able to 
bring the fed end of the 
Beverage directly to your 
receiver, especially with- 
out varying the axis of the 
wire less than 10 degrees. 
Even if you can, some type 
of a matching device 
should be used to lower the 
400- to 600-Ohm antenna 
impedance to that of a 
typical communications 
receiver. 

In most all cases, the 
Beverage is, or should be, 
isolated from the home or 



other antennas. This dic- 
tates the use of a feed or 
transmission line. 

My suggestion is the use 
of RG-58 or RG-59 uncon- 
taminating coaxial cable, 
double-shielded if avail- 
able. Double-shielded 
RG-59 is available from 
cable television supply 
houses or CATV com- 
panies, and is commonly 
known as drop cable. The 
better the shielding, the 
better will be the rejection 
of unwanted signals picked 
up on the feedline. Beware 
of the RC-58 being sold in 
many CB stores and some 
ham outlets. I have seen 
some that would be doing 
well if it had 45 percent 
shielding. 

Elsewhere in this article 
is a brief discussion on 
whether a preamplifier is 
necessary. If you choose to 
use one, then the input cir- 
cuit will need to be de- 
signed for the high im- 
pedance feedpoint of the 
Beverage and the output 
made to match the coaxial 
cable impedance. 

For the purposes of this 
section, let us assume that 
you are not going to use a 
preamplifier and therefore 
need to match the antenna 
directly to the feedline. 

This may be accom- 
plished in many ways; the 
common L-type network, a 
toroid autotransformer 
with a tapped selection of 
high impedance points, a 



4BJTENWA * 



common autotransformer 
made of coil stock/ or a 
4:1 balun of the type used 
on the antenna input of a 
television set, 

I am a believer in cutting 
the coaxial feedline to 
some multiple of an elec- 
trical half wavelength 
determined by the velocity 
factor of the coax, .66 for 
solid dielectric or .81 for 
foam. Free space half wave 
at 1 .8 MHz is approximate- 
ly 273 feet, A .66 velocity 
factor is 180 feet, or 221 
feet with .81 velocity. 
Therefore, the feedline 
would be 180, 360, etc., or 
221, 442, etc., feet long 
respectively. 

Be certain to ground the 
coaxial cable shield at the 
feedpoint. Either bury the 
coax a few inches in the 
ground or lay it upon the 
ground — do not suspend in 
the air. These measures are 
taken to prevent stray 
pickup on the feedline. 

Preamplifiers 

It rhay be desirable to 
employ a preamplifier with 
the Beverage antenna, par- 
ticularly in instances where 
long runs of coaxial cable 
feedline are necessary. Ad- 
mittedly, signal losses per 

*Though this is rather bulky, try 
about 3 Inches of B&W coil 
stock #3062 with the low im- 
pedance tap up 3 or 4 turns 
from the ground and the high 
impedance tap 15 to 30 turns 
up— you'll have to experiment. 



SEE BELOW 




C4 



T-^K™ 



RECElVErt 



RF CWOKE 



^'ISVOC 



t 



Fig. 3. 160 meter preamplifier suitable for Beverage use. T1: Amidon toroid, FT-82-61 or 
FT-114-6h primary (to antenna) of 2 turns #7S enamel, secondary of 25 turns #18 enamel, 
CI: miniature 365 pF air variable. D1-2: 1N914 or similar diodes. C2: 100-500 SM. R1: 
220L R2: 0-200 Ohms; adjust for preamplifier gain. R3: 6Mk. R4: 27k. C3: .01. Q1-2: MPF- 
102. Preamplifier maybe powered at point "'X'with a self-contained battery, 9-15 Vdc, or 
by duplexing through the coaxial cable feedline, in which case the pov\/^er may be inserted 
at the station end of the coaxial cable through an rf choke. C4 is a .001 blocking capac- 
itor. tf preamplifier is used at the feedpoint of the antenna, make certain of waterproof- 
ing. Preamplifier must be grounded to Earth, and may be built in a small minibox with 
short point-to-point wiring. The entire assembly could be placed in a small plastic 
refrigerator box for weather protection. 



55 






#^ 



5W-I 



a«rT£Niu «z 



f 




RECEtV£t tm 
PREAiiPUFirit 



Fig. 4. Manual switch for grounding one of two antennas 
not in use to prevent reradiation; see text SW-1 is a non- 
shorting double-throw double-pole toggle built inside a 
small minibox. Use leads as short as possible. Make cer- 
tain all grounds are good. If used at the feedpoint, bond 
miniboK to ground system. If used at the receiver, bond it 
to receiver chassis. Do not rely upon coaxial cable shield 
for ground. 



hundred feet of coax are 
low at these frequencies. 
Whether a preamplifier is 
necessary is left to the 
user. 

If one is deemed neces- 
sarv* a simple circuit is 
described by Doug DeMaw 
W1FB, in his April, 1977. 
QST article, "Build This 
'Quickie' Preannp/' In this 
preamplifier, as in all 
others, 1 would suggest the 
use of back-to-back diodes 
such as 1N914S at the input 
to prevent rf and similar 
damage to the preampli- 
fier. 

Back-to-back diodes are 
included in the schematic 
of another suitable pre- 
amplifier within this arti- 
cle. Credit for this circuit 
apparently belongs to 
K1PBW. See Fig 3. 

tf the preamplifier is 
used at the antenna, the 
most logical place, the 
device may be supplied 
power duplexed through 
the coaxial feedline, 



through a buried control 
cable that may also carry 
voltages for antenna selec- 
tion relays, or from a bat- 
tery contained within the 
preamplifier case, 



Reradiation and Inter- 
Antenna Coupling 

One undesirable charac- 
teristic of the Beverage 
antenna is its ability to 
reradiate large amounts of 
signal energy to nearby 
antennas, and to couple in- 
to them and cause varia- 
tions of antenna pattern 
and other unwanted char- 
acteristics. 

It is recommended that a 
Beverage antenna be 
physically removed from 
any other antenna by a 
minimum of half of 3 
wavelength; more is de- 
sirable. This may not be 
possible due to space 
limitations, but whatever 
the situation, it is recom* 
mended that when two or 



more receiving antennas 
are used, some method of 
grounding the unused 
antenna be provided. A 
schematic of a suitable 
manual switch included in 
this article can be used, or 
a method of automatic 
grounding with electri- 
cal ty-co nt rolled coaxial 
switches or relays can be 
devised. See Fig. 4. 

Government-sponsored 
tests on Beverage antennas 
reveal that they may be 
crossed within a few feet of 
each other, provided they 
do so at angles of 60 
degrees or more. Beverage 
antennas run parallel to 
one another, utility lines, 
wire fences, or the like 
should be separated by at 
least one wavelength. 

Lightning and Static 
Discharge Protection 

Beverage antennas are 
susceptible to collecting 
damaging voltages in the 
presence of certain weath- 
er conditions such as elec- 
trical, snow, and dust 
storms. Attention to the 
protection of receivers and 
preamplifiers is necessary. 
The ultimate protection is 
to disconnect the coaxial 
cable feedline at the anten- 
na, or, if a preamplifier is 
used, to disconnect the 
antenna prior to the pre- 
amplifier's input stage. 
Various configurations are 
obvious, and are recom* 
mended to be at the anten- 
na so as to not route the 
voltages into the home. 

If two or more Beverage 



antennas with separate 

feedlines are being used 
and you insist on bringing 
the feedlines into the 
house, a Barker and 
Williamson model 376 
coaxial switch, properly in* 
stalled, is suggested. The 
switch could be installed at 
the entrance to the build- 
ing. 

If you are using a ter- 
minated Beverage, it is 
wise to inspect the ter- 
mination resistor following 
any severe weather, as 
often the resistor will be 
damaged. 

Play it safe: Disconnect 
the Beverage when a storm 
approaches and any time 
you will be away from 
home. 

Conclusion 

The Beverage is not a 
cure-all or all-purpose 
antenna. It is a directional 
antenna and should there- 
fore be carefully aimed in 
the desired direction of 
reception. With a length of 
one to three wavelengths, 
the horizontal pattern will 
be approximately 45 to 30 
degrees, centered on its 
axis. It is also primarily a 
DX antenna, not intended 
for general all-around use. 

For serious DXing on 160 
or 80 meters, several 
Beverages wilt be required 
if all compass points are to 
be covered. However, sev- 
eral Beverages and a good 
receiving loop will enable 
you to explore to the 
fullest the two lowest high- 
frequency bands. ■ 










one etse (Sherry) drives me. / 
just don*t enjoy driving along at 
55 mph m a 120 mph car, so we 
burn up the old gas along with 
the other American cars.— 
Wayne. 






SELLING MORE MAGAZINES 









] 



ffQm pag^ 45 

200'Watt medium power ops 
come through a couple of times 
a week. The 20^ Watt stations 
are readable maybe once or 
twice a month, and then they 
are usually smothered by Euro- 



pean QRM. 

Of course, f also use a gas 
guzzler now. I used a very 
economicaf Datsun until I got 
fed up with the 55 mph speed 
limit. Now, as long as I can 1 en- 
joy driving any more, i go in a 
big van and work while some- 



Although 1 have been li- 
censed for only a relatively 
short period, I feel that the time 
has come to vent some steam 
and offer some suggestions 
and comments aimed al im* 
proving our way of life, 

I follow with interest and 
sometimes frustration what 



seems to be a never-ending bat- 
tie between Wayne Green and 
the ARRL. Yes, probably most 
of the bLjyefS of 73 are ARRL 
members. Any worthy organiza- 
tion such as the ARRL will 
solicit and accept suggestions 
aimed to improve its perfor- 
mance, but it seems to me that 
Wayne's constant down- 
grading of the League Is aimed 
toward selling more magazines 
instead of helping amateur 
radio. Let us all offer our full 
support to the League by offer- 
ing suggestions and im- 
provements. If the elected of- 
ficers fail to do their job, iet's 

Continued on p&ge 59 



56 





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57 



i^Hi 



R W. "Barry" Merriil W5GN 
10717 Cromweil Drive 
Dallas TX 75229 



How To 
Hang A Longwire 



without a catastrophe 



When space permits, a 
long longwire can 
be a great improvement as 
an antenna, especially on 
the lower frequencies. 
However, what size wire is 
needed to prevent break- 
age? 

The tension in a sus- 
pended wire depends on 
the span length, the sag in 
the wire, and the weight of 
the wire. A suspended wire 
will assume the shape 
called a ''catenary/' and 
the equations which 



describe the resulting ten- 
sion are rather complex, in- 
volving hyperbolic sines 
and cosines. These equa- 
tions have been solved and 
the results tabulated, per- 
mitting simple calculations 
for tension in the wire. 

Fig. 1 gives the physical 
layout of a suspended wire 
antenna, showing the span 
length "S'' and the droop 
''d'\ For a fixed span 
length, as the droop 
decreases (i.e., as the wire 
becomes more horizontal), 




7777777 



7777777 



Fig. 7. 



the tension increases. We 
can thus calculate the ten- 
sion in a particular span 
and compare this with the 
breaking strength of the in- 
tended wire. 

Table 1 provides the 
characteristics of soft- 
drawn copper wire, which 
is the type of wire coni- 
monly available, as well as 
the characteri^ics of hard- 
drawn copper and #1 2 cop- 
perweld, for comparison.^ 

As stated above, the ten- 
sion depends in large part 
on the sag of the wire. The 
sag of the wire is defined as 
the droop ''d" divided by 
the span length "S'', or sag 
= d/S. Based on the sag of 
the wire, Table 2 (which is 



'All data for this article was 
drawn from the Standard Hand- 
tyook for ElBptricai Engineering^ 
McGraw-Hill. 1957. 



the tabulated solution to 
the catenary equations, 
and can be plotted as a 
smooth graph) provides the 
stress factor 'T" and the 
length factor "L". The 
stress factor represents the 
increase in tension as the 
wire is drawn more 
horizontal, and the length 
factor represents the ac- 
tual wire length in the span 
(which is always greater 
than the span length). The 
tension in any span can 
then be calculated from 
the equation T = F x L x W 
X S, where T = resulting 
tension, in pounds; F = 
stress factor (based on sag, 
from Table 2); L = length 
factor (based on sag, from 
Table 2); W = weight of 
the wire, in pounds per foot 
(from Table 1); and S — 
span length, in feet. For ex- 
ample, a 1000-foot span of 
#12 soft copper wire, with a 



58 



droop of 50 feet has a ten- 
sion of T = 2,5 X 1.006 X 
,0198 X 1000 = 49.7 
pounds, since this span has 
a sag of .05. Comparing this 
tension with the breaking 
strength of #12 wire (Table 
1) of 197 pounds indicates 
this antenna would be safe. 
However, if the droop was 
decreased to only 10 feet, 
the sag would then be ,01, 
and the tension would in- 
crease to T - 12,5x1. 000 X 
.0198 X 1000 = 247.5 
pounds, which exceeds the 
breaking strength of the 
wire! 

Thus, by this relatively 
simple calculation, the ten- 
sion in a given antenna can 
be computed and com- 
pared. But is there a more 
general answer to the ques- 
tion of what size wire to 
use? Notice that the break- 
ing strengths for soft cop- 
per wire increase in exact 
proportion to the weight 
per pound In fact, the 
breaking strength is always 
10 times the weight of 1000 
feet of wire. Hence, in a 
1000-foot span, if the ten* 
sion is to remain less than 
the breaking strength, the 
stress factor must remain 
less than 10, and thus the 
sag must be greater than 
.012 (from Table 2, when 
plotted as a graph). This 
fact is independent of the 
wire size! However, this an- 
tenna would have tension 
equal to breaking strength, 
and would not allow for 
wind loading, icing, etc. If 
we choose a safety factor 
of 2 [I.e., tension will not 



exceed half the breaking 
strength), we then find that 
for any span length, any 
size wire will support itself, 
provided the sag (hence 
droop) is greater than some 
distance. These calcula- 
tions are summarized in 
Table 3, It should be real- 
ized that Table 3 is valid 
only for soft copper (bare) 
wire. If insulated wire were 
used, the breaking strength 
would not be increased ap- 
preciably, but the weight 
per pound would have in- 
creased, and hence the per- 
missible stress factor 
would be reduced, re- 
quiring more sag (hence 
more droop) to prevent 
breakage. For a general 
span, the maximum per- 
missible stress factor can 
be computed from the 
equation: 

BraaktnQ Strenplh of Wire 

F = 2_ 

(Welijhl p«r looO x {Sii^ length) 

Table 2 can then be used to 
determine what sag is re- 
quired to ensure this stress 
factor is not exceeded. 
There is additional safety 
in this equation, since span 
length is used, which is 
always less than the true 
length of wire suspended. 
Now, what if you happen 
to have supports 2500 feet 
apart, but only 150 feet 
high? Table 3 indicates a 
droop of 162 feet is re- 
quired. The only solution is 
to acquire stronger wire, 
which will require less sag. 
For example, #12 cop* 
perweld in this span would 
require a sag of only 37,5 



Wire Siz9 


Wtlght per Foot 


Breaking Strength 


(AWQ) 


(pounds) 




(pounds) 








Hard drawn 


Soft drawn 


6 


.0500 


826 






480 


10 


.0314 


529 






314 


12 


.0198 


337 






197 


14 


,0124 


214 






124 


16 


.0078 


135 






78 


18 


,0049 


85 






49 


20 


.0031 


54 






31 


22 


.0019 


34 






19 


24 


.0012 


= 21 






12 


26 


.0008 


13 






8 


12 


.0200 


785 






mmm 


(copperweld) 













Table 1, PhystCBl characteristics of solid bare copper wire. 



sae 


Stress Factor 


Length Factor 






apt* 




tittt 


.002 




62.5 




1.000 


,005 




25.0 




1.000 


.01 




12.5 




1.000 


.015 




8.3 




1.001 


.02 




6.3 




1001 


,03 




4.2 




1.002 


.04 




3.2 




1.004 


.05 




2.5 




1.006 


.06 




2.2 




1.009 


.07 




1.9 




1.013 


-08 




1.6 




1.017 


.09 




1.5 




1.021 


.10 




1.3 




1.026 


.15 




.99 




1,060 


,25 




S 




1.151 


^e2. 


Stress and ler^gth factors for various s* 




Span Length 


Minimum Droop 




(feet) 






(feet) 




250 






1.5 




500 


1 




6 




1000 






17 




1500 






37 




2000 






62 




2500 






162 



Table 3. Minimum permissible droop versus span length. 



feet, as the half-breaking 
strength of this wire is 392 
pounds. 

So, if you just happen to 
have two supports 1400 



feet apart, string your wire, 
using any size wire, but let 
the droop exceed 35 feet 
and you can rest assured 

the wire won't break! ■ 



r.oo:,s \ii.f\' t K-vr.r t ro jt r 



+ 



bu 

1 



t.-ai 



fmmpage 56 

oust them next election. 

Hans J. MMIer 

WB3DYHM04BFD 

Camp Leieune NC 

You*ve made som© good 







■J 



t? V 









*^ H Tf ij 



points, Hans. On one point you 
are in error. Criticism of the 
League does not increase 
subscriptions . . . to the con' 
trary, it very markedfy stows 
them down. You see, a great 
many amateurs feel as you do, 
that it is not nice to picfi on the 



ARRL To me, this is the same 
reaction we saw with many 
Repubiicans when the press 
started picking on Nixon for 
Watergate. 

Perhaps /Ve been around 
much, much too iong. My 
beliefs in the League were as 
bright as anyone*s many years 
ago. / beiieved that the 
members were the backbone of 
the organization and that the 
directors brought the wishes of 
the members to headquarters, 
eventually bringing about 
changes. tt*s a foveiy thought. 

Sure, t know that most hams 
don't want to know about the 
political side of things . . . after 
ail, it's oniy a hobby. It is so 



frustrating to hear about the 
things that are going on behind 
the scenes, things over which 
none of us has any controi, that 
we would rather not know 
about them, it's easier to smile 
confidently and put Green 
down as being dumb or fust try- 
ing to make money. 

The ARRL is a long, iong 
story . . . / Ve covered much of it 
down through the years, and ( 
suppose t should take the time 
to write an article expfaining 
what the ARRL reatiy is and 
how it works. Few outside of 
HO understand the League and 
how it got the way it /s. Having 

Continued on page 61 



59 



Chmioph Janker WD4CPK/DFSTJ 

Marienburgerstr, 32 
79SQ Ravensburg 

H^€sl Germany 



The "German" Quad 

six bands with one antenna 



Technical development 
leads to new and better 
amateur radio devices all 
the time, but it seems that 
in the field of allband 
antennas a stagnation has 
been reached. The hams 
who work all five SW 
bands mostlv have two an- 
tennas for this purpose: a 
longwire for 80 and 40 
meters and some kind of a 
three-band beam (which 
means "ugly things" on a 
tower in the garden). From 
the ham's viewpoint this is 
ideal, but most do not want 
to give their neighbors a 
reason to move at least 
three blocks away. 

In his weekend shack 
near Bremen (a harbor city 



in northern Germany), 
DL31SA developed a new 
amateur radio allband 
antenna. He tested a lot of 
different configurations 
and forms until he found a 
solution which is simple 
and operates well on 80, 
40, 20, 1 5, and 10 meters — 
and is even useful for 2 
meters. 

He took 83 meters of an- 
tenna wire and mounted it 
in the form of a big quad 
about ten meters [30 feet) 
above the ground in a 
horizontal position, so that 
the ground serves as a 
reflector for 3.5 and 7 
MHz. Each leg of this big 
quad has a length of 20.7 
meters. The feed line is a 



PtASnc COVEII 

or sf>9»r TM 



Z^flHf* COPPER 
(PLASTIC IMSULATKIWI 






iO^^SD go AX 




Fig. 1. 



60- or 75-Ohm coax cable 
which is connected to the 
beginning and the end of 
the antenna wire in one of 
the four corners of the 
quad. 

A balun (1:1) may be 
used at the connecting 
point in case of TVI/BCI, 
but a long or a deeply 
ribbed glazed porcelain in- 
sulator does an even better 
)ob, because it allows for 
no power toss. The whole 
connection point should 
be sprayed with acrylic or 
otherwise protected 
against corrosion. DL3I5A 
put the whole connection 
into a plastic cup to pro- 
tect the end of the coax 
cable against wet weather. 
(See Fig. 1J 

The length of the trans- 
mission line is random, and 
impedance checks re- 
sulted in an impedance of 
60 to 90 Ohms at the feed- 
point, so that a 75-Ohm 
coax would be more 
favorable than 60-Ohm 
cable. 

As a good material with 
sufficient strength, a 2.5 
mm-diameter soft-drawn 
copper wire with an 
enamel coating was 
chosen for this antenna. 
The guy lines are weather- 
proof, rayon-fifled, plastic 



clotheslines. 

For a European amateur 
radio station, this antenna 
should be mounted in an 
e a s t-wes t/n o r t h-s o u t h 
direction, because the four 
preferred directions are the 
extensions of the quad's 
diagonals. This way. QSOs 
can be made to the north- 
east [South Pacific, )apan, 
etcJi to the northwest 
[North America), to the 
southwest (West Africa, 
South America), and to the 
southeast [East Africa, 
Arabia). Of course, this 
antenna can be fixed in any 
other direction to work any 
desired country. On the 15 
and 10 meter bands 
especially, several side 
lobes between the four 
main lobes were measured 
with a beamwidth of 10 to 
20 degrees in the horizon* 
tal plane. 

As a horizontal full-wave 
loop, this antenna receives 
only a negligible amount 
of electrical interference 
from the surrounding area. 

The standing wave ratio 
was determined by DL3ISA 
and is shown in Fig. 2, 
There may be small devia- 
tions from the swr due to 
the local ground condi- 
tions. The influence of 
other antennas is negli- 



60 



30r 



HORIZONTAL QUAD TOTAl LENGTH B^ 5m 
53F££T ABOVE GRQUUp 60il COAX 







'3.50 


3.55 


3 60 


]i.6& 


3 7 


7.0 


l.\ 


7.2 


7.3 




14 


14.2 


J4.4 






SlO 


21.3 


51.6 






26.0 


2%A 


£a@ 


£9 £ 

FREOUENCy (MHi) 


296 



3 75 



3 SO 



f/g. 2. 




— h5m 

JOm 



20 7in 




£55" 



r/g. J. Anfenna height: 10m, 



gible if these antennas are 
in the center of the quad. 
Parallel mounted antennas 
outside the quad gave a 
negative influence on the 
antenna data in the higher 
bands. Other antennas 
should be kept at a 
distance of at least seven 
meters from the quad. 

The radiation pattern on. 
80 meters generally is at a 
high angle, and a radius of 
600 miles has been found 
to be the area covered 
under normal conditions. 
The gain relative to a 
dipole mounted at the 
same height is around 6 dB; 
the quad has no directivity 
on 80m. On 40 meters, the 
radiation pattern is actual- 
ly at a lower angle than 
that on 80 meters, and has 
no directivity. 

On the 20, 15, and 10 
meter bands, the radiation 
pattern is at an extremely 
low angle (similar to a 
rhombic antenna). On 
these bands Jour preferen- 



tia[ directions have been 
figured out in poor-to- 
medium conditions, but 
with an open band no 
remarkable directivity has 
been observed. The 
horizontal angle of the 
main lobes is about 30 
degrees; the gain was 6 to 
10 dB better than a two- 
element three-band beam 
at the same height and 12 
to 18 dB better than a 
ground plane antenna, (See 
Fig. 3 J 

Most of the above is just 
theory. In my practice, the 
antenna has worked as 
described only on 10, 15, 
and 20 meters. On 80 and 
40 meters, the radiation 
has to be almost as low as 
on the higher bands. My 
log shows that within a 
couple of days in 
December, 1977, I worked 
the following stations, all 
on 80 meters SSB: 4Z4, 
TA1, W3, YK, VOL JAl, 
9M2, CT3, EA9, and C31. 
The transmitter used had 



an rf output of about 40-50 
Watts PEP, and no clipping 
or processing was used. 
The antenna worked just as 
well for short distances. A 
gain of at least 2-3 S-units 
could be observed as com- 
pared to a dipole. The 
antenna could not be 
tested in QSOs on 40 
meters, but comparable 
results are probable. 

DL3ISA found that the 
antenna works satisfac- 
torily at a height of at least 
5 meters above ground. 
However, the bandwidth 
on 80 meters becomes in- 
sufficient under these con- 
ditions. 

Near Frankfurt-am-Main, 
this antenna had been 
mounted according to the 
instructions of DL3ISA 
around a little house at a 
height of 9 meters. Ex- 
perimental measurements 
at this place showed the 
same results as we had 
before, even though there 
was a whole house with all 



O O ri H d 



^ 

M'. 









W *. 




from page 59 



been a member for 40 years and 
having personally known every- 
one Involved with it tor well 
over 20 of those years, my 
perspective Is good . . . and 
despite what you may want to 






believe, not very biased. — 
Wayne. 



CATCH 19 



Zl 



I read your editorial concern- 
ing CO infiltration Into the ham 



bands with great interest. You 
suggested at one point that we 
track them down with DF equip- 
ment, an excellent idea with 
only one problem , . , what do 
we do if we catch one? 

I had an interesting ex- 
perience recently along these 
lines, and It may illustrate the 
problem we might encounter if 
we caught one of these inter- 
lopers. 

I am the editor of New Hamp- 
shire's largest circulation 
newspaper. We are located in 
Manchester, and reach a wide 
circulation base. One of our 
readers called us recently to 
see if there was anything we 
tnlght do to help clean up chan- 



its electrical wiring inside 
the antenna. 

Due to the extremely 
low angle of radiation, it 
was possible to work 15 
and 20 meter DX to the US 
east coast and Brazil at a 
time when Europe was ex- 
pected to be down from 
the west for 30 minutes. 

A 2 meters test was 
made with a swr of 1:1.2 to 
1:2.0, so that the antenna 
could be declared as a "six 
bander" without even a 
balun. However, the test 
was only run from 144*146 
MHz. The North American 
band portion running to 
148 MHz was not tested. 

Taking into account the 
fact that this allband 
antenna is good for DX 
work in the higher bands, 
works most favorably on 
80 and 40 meters, and is no 
spectacular monster to 
your neighbor's eyes, it is a 
real gain for almost any 
ham. It's also not a bad 
idea for Field Day.B 

nel 19 In Manchester, ft seems 
that there Is one operator who 
is running more than legal 
power and splattering over two 
channels. This operator comes 
on every night and uses the 
most obscene, filthy language I 
have ever heard. He dominates 
the frequency for hours, and I 
assure you the language is 
disgusting. 

I thought it might make a 
good story and, perhaps if 
something was done, it would 
serve as a warning to similar 
operators to avoid such prac- 
tices. I called the FCC in 
Boston to see whether they 

Continued on page 63 



61 



Joel Eschmann K9MLD 
132 Ohio St 
Racine Wl 33405 



Mobile 

In 
Disguise 



the invisible 
3/8X2m antenna 



About a year and a half 
ago, while 1 was 
attending a repeater club 
meeting, someone re- 
moved all my radio equip- 
ment from my car, doing 
damage and inconve- 
niencing me. This got me 
upset! Fortunately, most of 
my gear was recovered be- 
cause it had identification 
on it. Since that time, 
though, I have been ner- 
vous about gear in my car 
and the antennas that give 
it away. 1 removed the 5/8 
antenna and went to a 1/4 
W4y(^, but it still wasn't the 
answer. Now it looks like 



Tve got a scanner in my 
car, not a 2 meter rig. 

While parking my car at 
work one morning, a Ford 
LTD pulled up next to me 
and I spotted a cowl- 
mounted antenna used for 
AM/FM car radios. I got out 
of my car and went to look 
at it. It was stainless steel, 
held on the fender, and 
easy to mount. The one- 
piece element was 31" 
long. 31'' long is a 3/8-wave 
2 meter antenna! It looked 
like a perfect disguise 
antenna for my CM car. 

Now, how would I tune 
it? Looking at antenna pat- 



o 



FENDER ASSY. R 




Fig. 1. Cowl antenna. 



62 






CI 



ZT 



O 



1/ B IMvf 
AlltTEI|l|4 



ty 



1 



LI 



Fig. 2, 



terns, it appeared that the 
3/8 antenna looked like a 
pattern between a IZ+^vave 
and a 1/2-wave antenna. 
The untuned terminal im- 
pedance was about 200 
Ohms reactive. I had to get 
the impedance down to 50 
Ohms. After looking at a 
Smith chart (see the ARRL 
Antenna Handbook) to get 
an idea for an approach to 
tuning, I decided to use a 
modified L/C circuit. 

The coax cable used on 
the antenna as it came 
from the factory is totally 
useless for a transmitting 
antenna feedline The coax 
was trimmed short, leaving 
enough to attach a BNC 
connector (Fig. 3). A small 
aluminum box with two 
mating BNC connectors 
was used to house the 
matching circuitry. As illus- 
trated in Fig. 2, use a 25 pF 
variable capacitor and a 
length of RG-174 or RG-58 
5"-long coax. With the 
capacitor meshed 50%, 
take a small safety pin and 
puncture the coax. The pin 



should be allowed to short 
the shield to the center 
conductor. Starting at 5", 
move slowly toward the 
terminated end of the 
coax. At one point in this 
process, the swr meter will 
drop. Now adjust the ca- 
pacitor to a minimum meter 
reading. If necessary, for a 
minimum reading, move 
the pin now in much 
smaller steps to find the ex- 
act point at which the 
minimum reflected power 
is indicated. Cut the coax 
at this point. Trim and 
solder the end and ground 
it to the aluminum box. 

It is apparent you can 
get some gain from this 
antenna, although it is 
slight. With a 1/4 wave as a 
reference of O.D.B., an ap- 
proximate gain of 1.2 dB 
will be noted- Small as it 
may be, it's still gain. 

There are other antennas 
manufactured for the CM 
Corvette, the AMC autos, 
and Chrysler products. 
These will all work if 
modified as I've just 



3/6 WAVE 




Fig. 3. 

described. I would like to for his help on and off the 
thank Tom Rehm K9P1Q air. ■ 



* -* 






la- 




from page 6t 

mlflht send someone up, as we 
wanted to do a story an the 
problem and how they would 
solve it. Not as easy as that, I 
found out. The FCC facked the 
criminal jurisdiction, and the 









lrr:OU 



FBI woutd have to be con- 
tacted. OK, I said, and I called 
the Concord office of the FBI. 
They told me they needed 
authorization from the United 
States Attorney. 

] placed a call to the US 
Attorney, who told me that he 



had received several com- 
plaints, including several from 
Senator Mclntyre's office. He 
was going to authorize the FBI 
to investigate the case , , . fine, 
I said, and I called the FBI 
again. 

I got the distinct impression 
from the FBI that dirtying the 
airwaves did not qualify as a 
"major crime," and that they 
would work on it at thetr leisure. 
There was one problem, how- 
ever . . . they did not have the 
technical expertise to find the 
violator, so the FCC would have 
to become Involved. The FCC 
told me that they had the 
technical expertise, but [acked 
the criminal Jurisdiction. Ah, I 



said, Catch 22— so who would 
catch this person? The answer, 
unfortunately, was no one. He 
atifl operates on channel 19 
almost nightly in Manchester. 

You might say, "Who cares, 
CB is garbage band anyway 
,,/' The implications are far- 
reaching, however: If a CBer 
was to purchase a ham 
transceiver and begin opera- 
tions on one of our bands, who 
would stop hjm? tf this incident 
is any example, he might be on 
the band forever. 

I am not sure that we have a 
problem with unauthorized per- 

Continued on page 65 



63 



Richard Matthews WA4NWW 
Box 18S, Route 6 
Scottsboro AL 33768 



Better Than A Quad? 



try a delta loop 



It has been said that, before 
anything worthwhile can 
be done, there must exist a 
need. In my case^ the need 
was for a good cheap direc- 
tional antenna for 15 meters. 
It had to be something much 
better than a dipole^ but 
about the same cost. 

After weeks of searching 
for a ready-made low-cost 
beam and being stunned by 
prices in the one-hundred- to 
two- hundred -do liar bracket, 
the idea finally came to me 
that I must consider a home 
brew job or stay with {he 
dipole. So the search for that 
just -right design began, A 
quick look through one hand- 
book offered first a simple 
two-element yagi and then a 
two-element quad. For DX, 
this handbook says the quad 



Reftector totai length = 



1030 
f(MH2} 



Driven total length 



1005 



Element spacing = to 



0,17 



0.20 



Table L 



is better, but It is also quite 
large, fairly heavy, and needs 
mounting high off the 
ground. I have neither a 
tower nor a heavy-duty rota- 
tor, so the search continued. 

After reading on, I found a 
brief article about an antenna 
that some DX operators con- 
sider to be better than a 
quad. It was described as 
fairly small for 15 meters and 
also lightweight. But why had 
1 never heard one on the air? 
Why had I never seen one 
advertised for sale? There had 
to be some disadvantage. But 
there it was, in clear print: 
'*Some DX operators say the 
delta loop is better than a 
quad" There was only one 
thing to do — build it and 
give it a try. 

The description of con- 
struction of "the delta" was 
not very clear, although there 
was a formula for element 
spacing and loop lengths, (See 
Table L) After caloilating 
the reflector length for the 
middle of the band, I came 
up with 48.3* total length, or 
t6J' per side {not bad). The 
reflector length turned out to 
be 4X1' total length, or 15.7* 



per side (not bad, either). 

However, after calculating 
the spacing using X/0 J 85*, I 
found that the elements 
would need to be 248' apart 
No wonder nobody ever used 
a delta; it would be a 
monster. A 248' boom would 
be a little bit of a problem. 
Something was wrong. I 
checked my calculations, and 
they were okay* So t thought 
it had to be a misprint in the 
formula - X/0J7 to X/0.20 
should have been 0.1 7X to 
0,20X, I guessed. Anyway, 
this is the formula I used. I 
came up with a boom length 
of 10*0'* (not bad), so my 
delta was built using WQ" 
element spacing on 15 me- 
ters. See Fig. 1 for parts and 
assembly. 

Assembly time from start 
to finish was no more than 
six hours, and no special tools 
were required for construc- 
tion. 

After finishing building 
the antenna and mounting a 
TV antenna rotator on a 
short mast only about five 
feet above the roof, it was 
very little trouble for my 



XYL and I to lift the 12- 
pound structure to ite fmat 
resting place. The total boom 
height after mounting was 
only 20 feet from the ground 
and about 80 feet below the 
tops of dozens of hardwood 
trees on my lot. 

Adjustment of the antenna 
gamma match was another 
easy matter. With the help of 
a neighbor ham, tuning took 
only five minutes. With the 
clamp bar all the way to the 
top of the 36*1 nch gamma 
rod, just a half turn of the 
capacitor brought the swr 
down to a respectable 1,1 to 
1, To my great pleasure, I 
found that at no point across 
the entire 15 meter band did 
it rise above 1.5 to 1. Every- 
thing had gone fine so far^ 
and there was only one test 
left 

That test has been taking 
place over the past two 
months, using an HW-101 
Heath kit barefoot, mostly in 
the phone portion of the 
band. 

The first few days of oper- 
ation with the delta loop 
were spent with the antenna 



64 




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pointing west and with me 
enjoying compliments on the 
fine signal from Alabama 
which was reaching the west 
coast One of the first good 
characteristics that I dis- 
covered about the antenna 
was that it was very direc- 
tional, especially on receive. 
With a 30 dB over S9 signal 
from California being re- 
ceived, turning the loop off 
90 degrees either way would 
knock the signal down to an 
S2 or S3 reading. So, with 
this in mind, 1 began search- 



ing for maybe just a little DX. 

First a German field day 
station with an S9 report was 
added to my logbook. Then I 
had a first- time contact with 
Hawaii with another good 
report; then Alaska, another 
new one for me. So the delta 
foop was working, and I was 
well pleased. 

More proof that the loop 

is a great DX antenna has 
come in the past few weeks. 
With not a lot of on-the-air 
time, mostly in the evenings 



after work, there have been 
contacts with Japan, Russia, 
and over 20 European coun- 
tries, all with fine reports and 
with multiple contacts in 
most of them. My prize so far 
was a good contact with an 
Italian station running only 
three Watts on phone. My 
first CO on the 15 Novice 
band netted Czechoslovakia 
and the Netherlands, also a 
low-power station. 

If t sound thrilled, it is 
because I am. Of course, the 
performance of the delta 



would not seem so great to an 
operator who had been using 
a beam all along. But, for a 
fellow who has been using a 
dipole, it is a whole new 
world. It will give you a good 
chance in a big DX pileup, 
even if you are running low 
pow^ with a low antenna 
height 

Three other local hams are 
now building delta loops for 
their own use, and, if you 
also would like to knock *em 
for a loop, try the delta loop. 
It is better than a quad! ■ 







'^ *f 






from page 63 

sons operating on the ham 
bandSp but if we did, then we 
might find that w© would get lit- 
tie or no help from those 
charged with enforcing the 
Communications Act. Obvious- 






iy, local authorities have no 
jurisdiction. 

This incident has served to 
discourage me about the effec- 
tiveness of the Federal Com- 
munications Commission 
when it comes to violations of 
this nature. Sura, CB ts bad, but 



It will never gat any better 
without enforcement. I do not 
think that the OB part of the 
spectrum should simply be 
written off, but I am not sure 
what the solution is. 

The Implications of this Inci- 
dent reach far beyond one sim- 
ple GBer who has a sick mind, 
and extend Into our own bands 
as well. It is obvious to me that 
the FBI has better things to do 
then to get Involved with radio 
complaints, be they CB or ham. 

Thank you for such a fine 
magazine. \ would subscribe to 
no other 

Dan GIngras WA1BLR 
Manchester NH 



MILES AHEAD 



In the little over a year that I 
have been getting 73 Magazine^ 
I have read with interest your 
open and realistic editorials 
concerning amateur radio. Un- 
like the American Radio Relay 
League, which prints only for 
the betterment of "the 
League/* you have demon- 
strated your concern for the 
amateur In general. There have 
been times when I thought that 
your attacks on the ARRL have 
been misguided, but after 
reading in QST about the 



Continued on fjags 69 



65 



A J. Massa W5 VSR 
FOBox 60 75 
NewOrlGans LA 70114 



The Perverted 
Double Vee Antenna 

double your pleasure 
from 40m through 10m 



A 70-foot free-standing 
tower with multi- 
element yagis for 40, 20, 15, 
and 10 meters, plus a rugged 
rotator to handle the Christ- 
mas tree, is the dream of 
almost every ham. Butp oh, 
the expense, the complica- 
tions involved in erecting 
such a monster, and don*i 
even mention the XYL's 
screams of terror at the 
thought of that half ton of 
aluminum and steel hanging 
heavy over the heads of her 
beloved family^ threatening 
to crush everyone and every- 
thing come the next wind- 
storm, tormado, or hurricane. 

Be not of weak faith ! The 
dream may become a reality, 

if what you actually want is 
an antenna system with gain, 
directivity, excellent front- 
to-back ratio, rotatability, 
low cost, and relatively 
simple and safe construction 
— the perverted vee is your 
answer. Here follows a des- 
cription of a phased almost 
vertical /almost horiEontal 

66 



trapped multiband dipole, 
one which will satisfy all of 
the above criteria. 

There is an abundance of 
Information available on the 
theory and performance of 
phased (driven) arrays — 
vertical* horizontal, and in- 
verted vee systems.*'^ I can- 
not add substantially to these 
data, but I suggest that you 
review what may be conve- 
niently available to you. It is 
important for you to know 
that phased arrays work and 
that there is nothing very 
mysterious or complicated 
about constructing and ad- 
justing them. The perverted 
vee is a phased array. 

The Antenna 

A study of the diagram in 
Fig. 1 shows the array to 
consist of two trapped 
dipoles, ABC and EFG, 
supported at a common tie 
point at the top of a 50' mast 
or tower, Feedpoints B and F 
are held away from the mast 



by suitable nylon cord. The 
lower ends, A and G, are 
pulled back into the base of 
the mast. The resulting con- 
figuration is that of two vees 
lying on their sides, with their 
lops facing each other. The 
dimensions of each vee and 
the trap values are such that 
resonance can be attained on 
40, 20, 15, and 10 
meters.^'^^ Spacing between 
feedpoints B and F is approx- 
imately 34'. This represents % 
wave on 40 meters, ]/2 wave 
on 20 meters, 3/4 wave on 1 5 
meters, and a full wave on 10 
meters ~ classic spacing^ for 
phased arrays* Without 
becoming too technical or 
too involved in the details 
concerning trap construction, 
a few words regarding the 
traps are in order. Accepted 
theory and practice indicate 
that the L/C values given here 
will allow each dipole to 
work on the frequencies of 
interest and with acceptable 
vswr indications. Home brew 
traps can be made using 



ordinary coil stock or by 
winding 12'gauge or 14-gauge 
wire on wooden dowels, 
plastic rods, tubes, etc. The 
capacitors can be of the 
ceramic doorknob variety, 
high-voltage disc ceramics, or 
about 10 inches of RG-8/U- 
Whatever your preference, 
they must be grid dipped or 
noise bridged to resonance at 
14.1 MHz. 

My original attempt at 
home brewing suitable traps 
with coil stock and RG-8/U 
was successful, but I was not 
confident about their long- 
term stability and durability. 
Adequate weather proofing 
was' a problem. But, very 
recently, there have become 
available ideal commercially- 
made traps which fill the bill 
perfectly. They are the model 
4-FG traps by Pace-Traps, 
Middlebury CT. I replaced 
the original traps with the 
Pace-Traps, having only to 
make minor adjustments in 
the wire element lengths to 
restore resonance of the 



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fi|?, /. Perv^ied vee phased array. Antenna # J — ABC; 
antenna #2 — f FG. 77-^ — rr^s fo resonate at 1 4. 1 MHz; L 
— 10 turns f 6 tpt] 2!4'* diameter, 12 gauge; C — 25 pF 
(CL850S-25Z). 



antennas. 

The Phasing Unit 

The phasing unit (Fig, 2) ts 
as simple a design as possible, 
requiring only a sing!e-pole, 
3-position switch, two 11*3*' 
lengths of RG-58 solid (not 
foani) coaxial cable, 3 SO 
239 chassis connectors, and a 
suitable small enclosure. An 
aluminum '*Tite-Fit" box 
measuring 3W' x 6" x 8'* is 
recommended. 

The 1V3" lengths of 
phasing lines are not terribly 
critical. An inch, more or less, 
will not seriously affect the 
performance of the perverted 
vee. These lengths were 
arrived at from the formula 
for l/S-wave coaxial phasing 
(delay) lines for 40 meters ^ 
123 X .66/7,2 MHz. (.66 is 
the velocity factor for solid 
dielectric coax.) 

The total ofthe two 113" 
lengths of coax, 22 '6*', pro- 
vides electrical lengths of !4 
wave (90 degrees) on 40 
meters, Yi wave (180 degrees) 
on 20 meters, 3/4 wave (270 
degrees) on 1 5 meters, and 1 
wave (360 degrees) on 10 
meters. In switch position 2, 
9 degrees phasing (broadside 
directivity) is accomplished, 
as both antennas are fed 
simultaneously in phase. 

There is magic in the use 

of the two 113" phasing 
lines, giving the directive 
patterns shown in Fig. 3, You 



get all of that with only two 
short pieces of coax and one 
simple three-position J single- 
pole switch and no waiting 
for the rotator to grind its 
way around from east to west 
or north to south. 

The Feedlines 

Direct your attention once 
more to the RG-58 feedlines 
between the antennas and the 

phasing unit Each of the two 
feedlines must be the elec- 
trical equivalent of the other. 
That is, they must be the 
same length. There can be no 
Mickey Mousing around on 
this point. It is strongly 
recommended that you use 
an antenna noise bridge or 
grid*dip meter to closely 
match the two lines once you 
have cut them to the same 
physical lengths. Although 
the total length of each line 
doesn't have to be more than 
just enough to reach the 
shack and phasing unit, I 
suggest that you make Lhcm 
multipli^ of 45 feet [Yz wave 
at 40 meters). The reason for 
this suggestion is, of course, 
that it will make it possible 
for you to get valid vswr and 
resonance indications when 
you are adjusting the antenna 
wire lengths. 

Don*t be unduly con- 
cerned about using RG-58 
(solid dielectric) coaxial 
cable, even if you are using a 
2 kW PEP amplifier. Bear in 
mind that each feedtine will 



tD AKTEHHA. 
{FEEDLIME H} 



\ fh 




ABC 
(FC£DLJNE D| 






TO SWR flftiDCE AMU 

jliitemna coupler 



Fig. 2. Phasing unit. 



be carrying only one-half the 
total output of your trans- 
mitter amplifier and that the 
average SSB or CW power in 
each line will be roughly half 
of that. In other words, if 
your 2 kW amplifier has an rf 
output of 1,200 Watts PEP, 
only 600 Watts PEP will be 
fed to each coaxial line* Since 
the average power is about 
half of the PEP power, each 
line will carry only about 300 
VValU average power, which is 
well within the rating? of 
RG-58. 

Swr Bridge and Antenna 
Coupler 

Under the best of circum- 
stances, no antenna will be 
perfectly flat - vswr 1:1; 1 
guess I should say that most 
practical antennas will show 
some vswr other than 1:1, A 
pair of antennas, such as the 
perverted vee or any other 
phased array, will almost 
certainly show other than a 
"flat" condition to the trans- 
mitter output circuit, and the 
antennas will require a means 
of flattening out vswr ratios 
of as much as 2.5:1* If you 
already have a transmatch, 
matchbox, L-network, pi- 
network or some other such 
'Mine flattcner** and swr 
bridge, use it between the 
phasing unit and transmitter 
(or linear amplifier), and 
adjust it whenever necessary 
for vswr 1:1 to the final rf 
stage. 

A simple L-network will 
do the job. The circuit of 
one which I have used with 



excellent results is shown in 
Fig, 4. ft wfll flatten out 
mismatches of up to 3:1. 

Construction 

Because the perverted vee 
is a system composed of two 
trapped dipoles, usual pro- 
cedures for trapped dipole 
construction should be 
followed. Materials which 
you will need for construc- 
tion of the antenna elements 
are listed in the parts list. 

Begin by cutting the 
appropriate lengths of an- 
tenna wire. YotJ might as well 
cut all the lengths for both 
sides of the perverted vee at 
the same time, with an extra 
3" at each end of each length 
for fastening to traps and 
insulators. So, you will cut 4 
lengths of IT each and 4 
lengths of 1 7'2** each. Scrape 
or sand the coating off the 
ends of the wire lengths to a 
distance of about 6" for final 
soldering. 

If you decide not to use 
commercial traps, refer to 
construction details in the 
ARRL Handbooii^ ' Unless 
you are an excellent crafts- 
man and have had experience 
building antenna traps, you 
will save a lot of time and 
possible trouble by buying a 
Spt of 4 traps. 

Now put one dipole to- 
gether and then the other, 
using the first as a model. I 
started mine by tying a short 
piece of cord to one of the 
end insulators and then to the 
farthest corner of my back- 
yard fence. Then I put one 

67 



■■■ 



C<H.T 


CoL2 


Cot, 3 


Ojr.4 


Cd.S 


aA = 0'i25 


oA-o^ 


aA = 0.375 


oA = 0^ 


o/X = 0.625 



Col. 6 Col. 7 

a/k-0.75 tt/X=0A7S 



o/X =1.0 



s o o 









Row 2 



Howl 



O G 



O 
















Row 4 











Row 5 
a=1«0' 











Switch Position Approximate HortjEontal Patterns 



2 

3 



40 meters 
Col. 2, Row 3 

CoL 2, Row 1 
Col. 2, Row 3 
Reversed 



20 meters 
CoL 4. Row S 

Col. 4, Row 1 
Col. 4, Row 5 



1 5 meters 
CoL 6, Row 3 
Reversed 
C<3L 6, Row 1 
CoL 6, Row 3 



TO meters 
CoL 8. Row 1 

QdL 8, Row 1 
Col. 8, Row 1 



end of IT precut length of 
wire through the insulator, 
pulling through the insulator 
3'* of wire and nnaking the 
wrap. The other end of the 
wire is fastened to a trap in a 
similar hianner. Next comes 
the 17'2" length. Fasten one 
end to the trapi as before, 
and the other end to the 
center insulator* Continue on 
the other side of the center 
insulator with another 17*2** 
length of wire, a trap, an IV 
length of wire, and an end 
insulator. One dipole is 
finished, and, if youVe lucky , 
you will find a convenient 
fence post to tie the finished 
end of the dipole to with a 
piece of cord, the same way 
as you started. 

The other dipole can now 
be assembled right alongside, 
and it will be easy to make it 
identical to the first. 

While the dipoles are 
hanging there taking a set, it 
would be a good time to 
prepare the RG-58/U feed- 
lines — two feedlines, elec- 
trically identical to each 
other and long enough to 
reach from the antenna feed- 
points to the shack. As I 
mentioned previously^ it is a 



Fig. 3. 

good idea for the feedlines to 
be multiples of half wave- 
lengths at 40 meters - AS\ 
90', or 135' (I hope you 
won't need more than 90*; if 
you doj you should substitute 
RG-8/U). 

The length of an electrical 
half wavelength of coaxial 
cable such as RG-58/U or 
RG-S/U (solid dielectric) is 
found by using the formula 
492 X .66 (velocity factor)/F 
MHz. By substitution and 
solution for 7.2. MH?, the 
result is 45.1*. 45' is a good 
number to start with, as 
actual measurement with a 
grid-dip meter or antenna 
noise bridge usually shows 
this length to be slightly long. 
But, since it will take at least 
42' of feedline to reach from 
the feedpoint of the dipole to 
the base of the mast, and it is 
unlikely that your shack is 
only 3' from the base of the 
mast, it is best to consider a 
minimum feedline length of 
90'. 

Assuming that ihis length 
will satisfy your need, cut a 
piece of coax to measure 90\ 
Measure it electrically and 
prune it to resonate as a full 
wave at 7.2 UHi. If the 



second feedline is of the same 
manufacture, you will be safe 
in cutting it to the same 
length as the first. Double 
check with the grid dipper or 
bridge to be sure. Remember, 
except for the convenience of 
being able to measure reso- 
nance of the antenna at some 
point remote from the feed- 
point itself, length of the 
feedline isn't important, but 
predictability and reliability 
of performance of a phased 
array, such as the perverted 
vee, depend on the two feed- 
lines being etectricaily 
identical to each other. 

Once the feedlines arc cut 
to final length, attach them 
to the dipole feedpoints, B 
and F, making sure thai the 
coax shields are connected to 
the elements B-A and F-G 
and the coax center con- 
ductors to elements B-C and 
F-E. A piece of tape on the 
antenna wire next to the 
center insulator will help you 
identify the shield- fed side. It 
is a good idea to wrap a piece 
of tape around each length of 
coax 1 T from the feedpoint. 
This will give you a con- 
venient way to space the 
dipole centers 17' out from 



your mast. Tie a 35* length of 
nylon rope to each center 
insulator 

Now lel*s test and adjust 
the dipoles for resonance, one 
at a time, starting with dipole 
ABC Raise end C {coax 
center conductor side) to the 
top of the mast (you do have 
a pulley or S-hook up there, 
don't you?), leaving a 4** to 
6" space between the insula- 
tor and the pulley. Find the 
piece of tape you put at 17' 
down the coax from the 
center insulator and attach it 
to a place on the mast about 
24' or 25' above the ground. 
A TV standoff insulator or a 
few wraps of electrical tape 
will serve the purpose. Take 
the other end of the 35' 
nylon rope tied to point B 
and walk away from the mast 
with it until the coax B-D 
becomes fairly horizontal, A 
tittle slack is okay^ but make 
it as tight as good judgment 
says you should. Tie down 
the end of the nylon rope. 
Pick up the loose end of the 
dipole, A, and fasten it to the 
bottom of the mast with a 
short piece of nylon rope (4'* 
to 6**), 

Dress the coax hanging 
from point D down the side 
of the mast, and use a few 
wraps of tape to secure it to 
the bottont of the mast. Take 
the rest of the coax to the 
shack and connect the end to 
your swr bridge, the bridge to 
your transmitter. Set the 
transmitter vfo to 14.2 MHz, 
load the transmitter for 
enough output to '*drive" the 
swr meter to full scale for* 
ward, and check swr. From 
til is point on, usual antenna 
adjustments for lowest swr 
indications should be 
followed, adjusting only the 
16'8'* lengths of the dipole at 
the feed point side of the 
traps. 

Once the antenna is 
resonated at 14.2 MHz, set 
the transmitter to 7,2 MHz. 
Adjust the outer ends of the 
dipole, at insulators A and C, 
for lowest swr. The dipole 
should now be adjusted for 
resonance on 40, 20, IS, and 
10 meters. It is not likely that 
the antenna will show 1 :1 swr 



68 



on any, much less all, fre- 
quencies; but the dipole will 
be resonant, and that is the 
important thing. Excessive 
5wr will be flattened out in 
the antenna coupler. 

Dipole EFG should be put 
up and adjusted in the same 
manner as dipole ABC, but 
you must take down, or at 
teast collapse, dipole ABC 
while adjusting dipole EFG. 
If for no other reason, take 
this on faith. 

Once dipole EFG is 
resonated, leave it in place 
and reerect dipole ABC. The 
two dipoles must be exactly 
opposite each other for pre- 
dictable results, and the feed- 
points should be about 34' 
apart, give or take a foot. For 
the sake of neatness and 
safety, tape the two feedtines 
together from the base of the 
tower to where they enter the 
shack* A couple of wraps of 
electrical tape every 8' or so 
will do nicely. 

As I mentioned previously, 
the phasing unit is a simple 
but most effective device. I 
credit my good friend and 
mentor, jerry Swank 
W8HXR, for first showing me 
this circuit. The only 
"tricky*' thing about its con- 
struction is to be sure that 
you connect the shields of 
the two pieces of coax to- 
gether and to ground. Use 
short pieces of RG-58/U 
between contacts 1 and 3 and 
the SO-239S. These pieces of 
coax should be the same 
length. 

With the switch in position 
1, dipole ABC lags dipole 
EFG. In position 2, both 



dipoles are fed simul- 
taneously for inphase opera- 
tion. In position 3, EFG lag$ 
ABC, Fig. 3 shows directivity 

for the system on the various 
bands. 

Performance 

To state gain^ front- to- 
back, and front- to-side figures 
in decibels for a practical 
antenna system can be, and 
usually iSp misleading. When- 
ever I see such data, I wonder 
if the system in point is com- 
pared with an isotropic 
source, real dipole (horizontal 
or vertical), or vertical 
{ground plane, ground 
mounted with radial s). And 
there is the consideration of 
angle of radiation of the main 
lobe(s). The best I can tell 
you about the perverted vee 
is that you can expect gain of 
3 to 5 decibels in the main 
lobes and attenuation of 10 
to 30 decibels in the nulls. 
The comparison is made 
against a single-element 
dipole such as ABC. 

The perverted vee is an 
efficient radiator and an 
excellent DX system* As a 
vertical, it provides good 
low-angle radiation and 
directivity. Compared with 
ground-mounted or ground 
plane vertical phased arrays, 
it performs wet! with less 
dependence on Earth reflec- 
tions, radial s, etc. Compared 
with phased inverted vees or 
horizontal dipoles, it is far 
less complicated to put up, 
requiring only a single sup- 
porting mast or tower And 
like an inverted vee, rt will 
provide reliable middle- and 



r' 



n 



m 



""^ 




Ht/LO 




i 



D«TPUT 



LQ/Ht 



40fJpF 
VARIABLE C*P 



Fig. 4. L-network CI — 400 pF air vanab/e capacitor; LI — 
coll, 7/ turn, S tpi\ 2^" diameter, 11 gauge; SI — 12-position 
rotary (phenolic okay to 300 Watts); S2 — SPOT rotary 



con, i / I urn, o ipt^ ^'/2 oiameier, 1 1 ga 
rotary (phenolic okay to 300 Watts); S2 
(phenolic okay to 300 Watts). 



short-distance communica- 
tions. 

So, there it is, "an antenna 
system with gain, directivity, 
excellent front-to-back ratio, 
rotatability, low cost, and 
relatively simple and safe con- 
struction/* with 4-band 
capability, as well. It's a 
whole lot cheaper than a 
linear amplifier (which does 
nothing to improve recep- 
tion},* 

References 

1. Lee, P, H,^ "Vertical Antennas 
^ Part I v." CQ, Sept., !96S, p, 
37. 

2. Lee, P, H., "Vertical Antennas 
- Part VI 11/' CQ, Jan,, 1969, p. 
46. 

3. Lee^ P, H., "Vertical Antenna? 



- Part IX/' CQ, Feb., 1969, p. 
54. 

4. Lee, P. H., "VerTical Antennas 

- Part xr/' CQ, ApriL 1969, p. 
38- 

5. Hy-Gain Electronics Corp. 
Engineering Report, "Amateur 
Phasing." 

6. Bibby, M. M,, "Unidirectional 
Antennas for the Low-Frequency 
bands/' Ham Radio, Jan,, 1970, 
p, 61. 

7. Schultz, J,, **2 Elerrients 
Spaced A Quarter- Wave length/* 
75,Jan., 1968. p.22. 

8. Swank, J. A., "Four Element 
Phased Vertical Array/' Ham 
Bmiio, May, 1975, p.24. 

9- Pace-Traps, "4FG Data Sheet" 
(Pace-Traps^ Box 234^ Mfddlebury 
CT 067621 

10, The Radio Amateur's Hand- 
book, 1972, p. 532. 

11. The Radio Amateur's Hand- 
book, 1972, p. 588. 



Parts List 

120' antenna wire (I prefer 14-gauge enamelled copper. It is easy to 

handle, and the enamel coating prevents oxidation J 

70* nylon cord, 1/8" dianneter 

4 end insulators (ordinary 3" porcelain or 1" x 3" )c!4" strips of 

Lucite,^^ 

2 center insulators to accornmodate RG'&8/LJ (B&W, Hy-Gain, Pace, 

Greene, etc,^ or your favorite home brew typeL 

4 traps, resonated to 14.1 MHz (Pace-Traps or home brew) 

2 TV standoff insulators (mast type) 

1 50' push-up TV TTiasi {\f you don't already have one, or a 50* tower or 

2 50' trees to string a catenary between} 



-4 



PiOO:,^ 







from page ^ 

League's kHIing of C8 on 220, 
the League's Code of Ethics to 
be forced upon everyone, and 
the League's futile efforts 
toward WARC 79, I realized 
who stood for amateur radio 






and who stands for them- 
selves. 
Your March editorial is a 

good point. When forced to 
show how much impact the 
Code of Ethics has had con- 
sidering the amount of publici- 
ty they gave it, the League 



couldn't f Only a few distribu- 
tors of gear had joined up, the 
main group of manufacturers 
teHIng the League to go jump! 
Your editorial also brought out 
Into the open some new facts 
concerning the group known as 
HFers, While the League warns 
us of the sinister Intentions of 
th(s group, only you have the 
courage to raise the point that 
by far these operators are the 
cream of the crop. While their 
actions are illegal (which most 
of CB was until the FCC legaliz- 
ed it), these operators attemp* 
ted to do something about 
crowded band conditions, 
idiotic and dangerous opera- 
tions, and the general improve- 



ment of their surroundings. Un- 
fortunately, they have been 
held back in their growth to big- 
ger and better things by the 
policies expounded by the 
ARRL. Rather than encourage 
them to advance beyond what 
they have now* the League 
drives everyone into Novice 
courses, the end result being 
that they can now use legaMy 
their Yaesus, Kenwoods, etc, 
on small portions of intensely 
crowded bands. Does the 
League encourage them to ad- 
vance to Generaf and above? 
No, they petition the FCC to 
Widen the Novice band on 80, 

Ccmtinued on page 73 



69 



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Z MTA TRAHSCitVEB 



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MHf fAST SLOW 




SOUtLCH 



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in no other transceiver are: 

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71 



^m 



Creeping Crud Got Your Signal? 

pollution is slowly destroying your beam 



Dave Ingram K4 TWJ 
Eastwood Viiim^, ^o. 1201 So. 
Rl !h Box 499 

Birmingham AL 3 52 JO 



One of the most often 
neglected items in an 
amateur setup is the tri- 
band beam antenna. Once 
this lone radiator is pur- 
chased and placed atop a 
tower or mast, it is seldom 
maintained, until signals 
deteriorate to unaccept- 
able levels or until the 



QTH is moved. This course 
of action is somewhat 
natural because access to 

a tribander is usually dif- 
ficult and because factory- 
preset traps are seldom 
checked. As a result, many 
neighborhood insects find 
the tribander an idea! sanc- 
tuary in which to live and 
eventually create car- 
bonized paths in coils and 
insulators. 

This article will describe 
some basic maintenance 
ideas and preservation 
measures which can be 



used with trtband beams to 
insure their long life. Any 
of these concepts will 
prove quite helpful when 
refurbishing an aged beam 
or vertical antenna. 

While some beams can 
be accessed from their 
location atop a tower, the 
usual procedure involves 
watting until they can be 
moved to ground level for 
servicing. Before disassem- 
bling a trapped antenna, 
carefully mark each ele- 
ment's position and the 
connecting sections of 




^ L. 




Photo A, Disassembled antenna e/emenfs are placed in a logical sequence and color 
coded with tape before rebuilding efforts begin. Renjember to also color code the boom 
and keep track of the nnounting blocks. 



each elennent. Colored 
strips of electrical tape are 
ideal for this coding step. 
Likewise, place all spacers 
and/or mounting blocks in 
an appropriate place to 
avoid losing them. 
Murphy's law always reigns 
supreme while working 
with antennas I 

The first "rebuilding"' 
step usually involves 
replacing the antenna's 
coaxial cable with a new 
length of the same im- 
pedance. If you aren't 
using a low-loss foam 
dielectric cable, now's an 
ideal time to make the 
change. Rest assured the 
small additonal cost of 
foam cable is worth its 
outlay. (One of the best all- 
around types of 50-Ohm 
coaxial cable that I've 
found is Bel den's 8214. tt's 
mildly expensive, and its 
toss at 28 MHz is quite 
tow.) 

The next logical opera- 
tion is disassembling the 
various pieces of connect- 
ing tubing, cleaning their 
contact areas, and then 
reassembling them. While 
this step may seem 
somewhat trivial, it can 
make a noticeable dif- 
ference in antenna perfor- 
mance. Should such con- 
nections appear at current 
loops on the antenna, a 
mere fraction of an Ohm 
could reduce signal 



72 



strength. As a (remote) ex- 
ample, you've probably 
noticed how cleaning the 
battery contacts on an 
automobife also reduces 
resistance and often per- 
mits a weak battery to 
crank a car. Although sand- 
paper cleans antenna 
elements very well, 
replacement packages of 
"contact grease" can 
usually be purchased from 
the antenna's original 
manufacturer. Clean the 
elements individually to 
eliminate any possibility of 
cross-connecting them 
during reassembly. 

Next, disassemble the 
traps, and perform 
whatever maintenance is 
indicated by their condi- 
tion (assuming, of course, 
that your unit doesn't 
employ hermetically 
sealed traps). Overlooking 
this step may render your 
rebuilding efforts worth- 
less, so here's a trap- 
reworking guideline- 
First, spread a small 
amount of petroleum jelly 
near the boot on each end 
of a trap. Then, using a cir- 
cular rocking motion, free 
the boot and slide it back 
slightly. This permits ac- 
cess to the coil's mounting 
screws. Carefully remove 
the screws and pull each 
end from the trap's outer 
tubing. Clean the coils with 
a soft brush, remove any 
foreign matter, and repair 
any u n f o r t u n a t e " s u r - 
prises" which may be 
found. 

One typical example of 




Photo B. This shows what's in a trap and how it's disassembled. The coil in the upper left 
was charred by a carbonized path, as described in the text The driverhelement coils are 

coated with Corona Dope to improve rf insulation. 



such a "surprise" is the car- 
bonized path shown on the 
left top element of Photo 
B Apparently, a spider 
crawled through a drain 
hole fn the director's trap 
and became lodged there 
during transmissions (such 
accidents are well known 
among broadcast engi- 
neers). Eventually, the rf 
energy induced into this 
coil charred its polystyrene 
form and warped one end 
of the coil This trap was 
rebuilt by carefully re- 
bending the coil, cleaning 
the form of all carbon 
deposits, and moving its 
screw connection T80 
degrees on the form. A 



light coating of Corona 
Dope was also used to seal 
the damaged area. 

The next step involves 
lightly coating the driven 
element's coils with Coro- 
na Dope. This will prevent 
dampness accumulation 
and will make the traps 
high-voitage proof. 
Although the coils are 
darkened by the Corona 
Dope, it doesn't adversely 
affect their performance. 

Finally, the antenna is 
reassembled and sprayed 
with a liberal coating of 
Krylon^^ clear plastic. 
Then, it's placed back atop 
the tower or mast. 

I tried one other modifi- 



cation on my beam which 
proved very worthwhile. A 
W2AU 1:1 balun was in- 
stalled at the driven ele- 
ment, and it improved per- 
formance appreciably. The 
swr also decreased, though 
that change could also 
have been due to the trap 
rebuilding efforts. 

In conclusion, I would 
definitely say that rework- 
ing aged trap antennas 
(either beams or verticals) 
is truly worth the effort and 
time. Why not give it a try 
the next time you become 
displeased with that anten- 
na you've enjoyed for 
several years? The results 
may amaze you.B 



ou p:oon^ 









«^% 



trojir 




from pag& 69 

thereby keeping many from pro- 
gressing further. With incentive 
Hcensing, courtesy of the 
League, the bottom three 
classes of American amateur 
licenses now have the majority 



of amateurs. Why should they 
continue when alt they have to 
gain is more room to send CW, 
which is rapidly becoming an 
outdated mode of commgnica- 
tions^ and when they learn of 
the many witch-hunts such as 
intruder watches and the Code 



of Ethics which the ARRL tries 
to force down their throats. 

Unfortunately for the United 
States, there are not more peo- 
pfe like you, Wayne, who are 
willing to stand up for their 
rights and be counted. In 
Canada we have the same prob- 
lem, only i\ goes by the name of 
the Canadian Radio Relay 
League. However, there ts a 
second "nalionat" group in 
Canada, the Canadian Amateur 
Radio Federation, which has 
been successful in thwarting 
many of the same stupid moves 
of the League in Canada^ Re- 
cently, a CARF'Sponsored sym- 
posium with the Department of 
Communications was held to 



plan for the future needs of the 
Canadian amateur. The DOG 
proposed a no-code VHF-UHF 
ticket (completely legal under 
international rules), which with 
some major adjustments ap* 
pears certain to become a reali< 
ty. To be sure, the League was 
there with its own proposal for 
a Novice ticket very similar to 
that in the U.S. today. For- 
tunately, this was shot down. 
Not to let a dead Issue stay 
dead, the CRRL now wants to 
limit the existing "amateur" 
license in Canada for the first 
six months of operation to CW 
only. After six months, an en- 

Contintted on p^e 75 



73 



Towering 
Low Band Antennas 

berserk mathematician 

r 

figures impedance 



WaJier Schulz K30QF 
361 7 Nanron T&rrace 
PhUadeiphia FA 19154 

Recently there have been 
some articles written 
about verticals that explained 
the electrical parameters by 
mathematical expres- 
sions.^'^'^ The main em- 
phasis of one article was 
placed on a formula devel- 
oped by Dr, Sergei A. Schelb 
unoff of Bell Telephone 
Laboratories. 



2h 
2o = 60 [(toge ^)-1] 

a 

The vertical is compared 
to an open-ended trans- 
mission tine and its charac- 
teristic impedance is found. 
Once the characteristic 
impedance is known, the 
conjugate impedance values 
(resistance and reactance) are 
found by a transmission line 
formula* These conjugate 
values have also been tabu- 



I© 





iT 


"n. 




0^ 


y^ 


./ © 




\ 



LEfT SIDE 

or rniAKGUE 



HfGHT SIDE 
Of TftlAWGLE 



ffg* h 



lated in graphs cited in the 
reference nnaterial To use the 
graphs, Zq values must be 
known, along with antenna 
height in electrical degrees. 

This article addresses itself 
to determining the radius of 
irregular shapes, such as 
towers used in amateur radio. 
Why towers? Lately, there is 
a trend among amateurs to 
series feed or shunt feed their 
towers on 150 a: d 75 meters. 
If the above equation is to be 
used in solving tor conjugate 
impedance of a tower, its 
irregular shape must be 
equated to a circle* 

The example shown here 
will be a three-sided tower — 
Rohn model 25- This tower 
measures MYi inches on each 
of the three sides. The next 
requirement is to find the 
center of the equilateral 
triangle. 

To accomplish this, the 
following steps are necessary: 

1* Get one piece of note 
paper^ a right triangle^ a ruler^ 
and a compass. 

2. The tower triangle is too 
large to be drawn on note 



paper, so divide the 12}4 
inches by 2, which equals BVa 
inches. Use this value from 
now on in this problem, 

3, Construct line A 6V4 
inches long, as shown in Fig. 
T, Then divide the line in 
two, marking o'f the halfway 
point 3-1/8 inches (3) from 
each of the line ends* 

4, Construct line C 7 inches 
long, perpendicular to line A. 

5, Construct line D 614 
inches long from the end of 
line A on the left side of the 
triangle to line C 

6, Construct line E 6% inches 
long from the end of line A 
on the right side of the tri- 
angle to line C intersecting 
with line D. This completes 
construction of the equi- 
lateral triangle. (Note that 
each angle is 60 degrees*) 

7, On lines D and E, measure 
the halfway points or divide 
the line in two, as was the 
case in step 3 for line A. 

8, On lines D and E, draw 
perpendicular lines F and G 
at the halfway points so that 
lines F and G intersect with 
line C 

9, At the center point, use a 
compass and draw a circle 



74 



2000 




eo ioo 130 wo 

AMTEMNA HEIGHT {Q} IN DEGREES 



Fig. 2 Base input reactance of cylindrical antennas over a 
perfectly conducting ground plane. ^ 



around the triangle points 
The circie should touch al 
three triangle points, proving 
that the center is correct 
Now measure the radius to 
each vertex^ finding that the 
three values each equal 31^2 
inches. 

10. The triangle dimensions 
were reduced by 2 to fit the 
drawing paper. Multiply Vh 
inches by 2, which equals 7 
inches. Seven inches is the 
real radius value. 

The final step is finding 
the equivalent radius repre- 
sented by a three-sided figure 
now that the radius is known. 

a = radius of outscribed 

circle 

aeq = equivalent cylinder 

radius in inches 



aeq = a(0.4214) 

aeq = 7"(0.4214) = Z95 

inches 

Using Dr, Schelkunoff's 
equation, the characteristic 
impedance can now be found. 
Let h be the tower height (in 
this example, 60 feet); let a 
be aeq> the equivalent radius, 

2h ^ , 
Zo = 60 [doge — )-1] 



(2) (720") . . 
= 60 [doge )- 1] 



2.95" 



= 311,44 



Note: If the example an- 
tenna operates on 4 MHz, the 
wavelength is 246 feet. To 
find electrical degrees, do the 
following: 



3000 



£000 




lOO \Z0 140 

ANTENNA HEUSHT (G) |N DESRCES 



Fig. 3, Base input resistance of cylindrical antennas over a 
perfectly conducting ground plane. 



X = 



984 
f MHz 



984 



= 246' 



(h) (360) 



*^''*^^°i = 87 ff 



246^ 

Using the graphs in the 
reference list shows this 
tower's conjugate impedance 
value to be R 36 Ohms + jX 
25 Ohms^^^ over a perfectly 
conducting ground radial 
system. 

Since I do not own a 
General Radio rf impedance 



bridge (9l6Aor 1606B), this 
method saved me a lot of 

time and effort in series and 
shunt feeding towers. ■ 

References 

1. "Surprisfng Miniature Low 
Band Antenna/' 7J, August, 
1976, pp. 28^36. 

2. "The Multi-Band Trap Anten- 
na/' CQ, February, 1977, pp. 
2&7Z 

3. '"Antenna-Transmission Line 
Analog/' Ham Radfo, May, 1977, 
pp. 29^39. 

4. Jasik, Henry, Antenna Engi- 
neering Handbook, McGraw-Hill, 
Inc, Ne^A/ York, 1961, p. 3-7. 

5. Jasik, op, cit, pp, 20^6, 20-7, 

6. Smith, Carl E,, Theory and 
Design of Dtrectiona! Antennas. 



'V-^^-i K*^ ■»--■•■, -yw 







^ V'-^ r^ • i 

t% . ■ * Sr •- > ^fi^ 



from page 73 

dorsement can be obtained for 
operation on 10 meters and 
above. Thus, if they now tiave 
their way, no Canadian ama- 
teur wi II be al lowed to use voice 
Gommunication for the first six 



months of his first amateur 
iicense. fn the U.S,, at least one 
doesn't have to get his Novice 
certificate to proceed, but can 
get, for example, the General. 
Not so in Canada, if the League 
has its way. That's one hell of 
an incentive, when after study- 



ing and passing an exam 
harder than the General ticket 
in the U,S., the person must 
stay on CW for six months> 
Thank you ARRL-CRRL. Thanks 
for nothing! 

Again, Wayne, thanks for be- 
ing open-minded and for telling 
it like it is. I may not agree with 
everything that you say, but 
you're rrilles ahead of the 
American Radio Relay League. 

William LealVESIHB 
Windsor, Ontario 



AFFOHDABILITY 



I have been a ham for almost 



two years now. When I first got 
into amateur radio, someone 
told me that it was a rich man's 
hobby. At that time I disagreed, 
but after looking at some of the 
prices of new HF equipment, I 
think he may have been right. 

With the cost of raising a 
family, it is very hard to justify 
$700 for a transceiver, $200 for 
a beam, and several hundred 
nriore for an antenna support. 
OK, maybe you don't need all 
this, but who has a chance for 
making good contacts with all 
the high-power stations 
around? Sure, low power wiH 
get results, but I started on low 

Continued on p&g& 79 



75 



James E. Taylor W20ZH 
1257 Wildflower Drive 
Webster NY 14580 



The 80 Meter 
Pile Crusher 



the ultimate vertical? 



There is at least one 
advantage to operating 
exclusively on one amateur 
band — it en ecu rages dreams 
of better antennas for that 
band. 

At W20ZH, the band is 80 
meters, and such halt uci na- 
tions have led to a novel 
mobile configuration^ and to 
an effective direction-switch- 
able array using horizontal 
elements. The satisfaction 
afforded by this latter con- 
figuration has led to specula- 
tion regarding direct com- 
parison with a similar phased 
array using vertical elements. 

"A Low- Frequency Phased 
Array '*^ described prelimi- 
nary attempts to utilize the 
isixty-fbot supporting masts as 
vertical radiators. However, 
subsequent attempts to 
improve this vertical system 
using additional ground 
radials were disappointing. 
Two factors contributed to 
this lack of success: (1) the 
undesired cross-coupling from 
the verticals to the horizontal 
elements, and (2) the 
proximity of the house, 
which interfered with the 



laying of a full symmetrical 
radial system. Thus, each 
radiator did not form a 
simple resonant circuit (for 
maximum current) and the 
radial system permitted a 
high degree of near-field 
ground penetration (with 
attendant ground losses). 

As a result of these 
defects J I decided to start 
from scratch on a vertical 
array composed of two reso- 
nant radiators sixty feet (X/4) 
apart In the rear lawn, 
sufficiently far from the 
house to permit a sym- 
metrical ground radial system 
to be laid. This article 
describes the constructional 
details of these radiators. 

Operating Principles 

Sevick^ and others have 
shown that vertical antennas 
which are much less than 
one-quarter wavelength long 
can be effective radiators if: 
(a) the losses in the antenna 
element and matching system 
are kept small, and (b) a 
low-loss image plane is pro- 
vided using a large number of 
radials approximately a 



quarter wavelength long. 
Elwell^ has pointed out that 
the current loop of a resonant 
vertical antenna can be 
moved upward away from the 
base by changing the tuning. 
The qualitative diagrams are 
shown in Fig, 1, 

However, before you set 
about ^ just copying what 
others have done, it is worth- 
while to review some funda- 
mentals in the tight of where 
you want to go. 

If you are to have low 
losses in the antenna element, 
you need only use large 
diameter conductors, in- 
cluding any loading colls 
which are used. However, you 
also need to consider what is 
necessary to achieve a low- 
loss image plane. Maxwell^ 
has depicted clearly the rf 
current flow in the ground 
system of a typical vertical 
antenna (see Fig, 2). 

The power loss in such a 
ground system occurs both in 
the resistance of the radial 
system and in the ground 
beneath the radial system 
(due to field penetration of 



the earth). Thus, if you wish 
to decrease these ground 
system losses, you should try 
to decrease the current 
flowing in the radial system 
near the base of the antenna. 
This will serve both to de- 
crease the direct resistive 
losses and to decrease the 
penetrating field. 

Referring to Figs. 1(c) and 
2, you can see that Elwelt is 
on the right track; the current 
at the base ol the antenna 
and out into the radial system 
is small for this arrangement. 
However, his series feed at 
the base of the antenna pre- 
sented matching problems 
due to the high impedance at 
this point You need to retain 
the low base current, yet be 
able to feed the radiator 
directly from a low- 
impedance coaxial feedline 
without a matching network 

For guidance^ let's review 
some antenna fundamentals. 
The basic rf resonance of a 
straight conductor is dipolar^ 
that is, the instantaneous 
voltage at one end is (+) and 
at the other end [-}. This is 
the mode shown in Fig, 1 (b). 
It must be noted that, at 
resonance, the reactance is 
cancelled, and, at all points 
along the antenna, the imped- 
ance is a pure resistance, tf 
you now look at Figs. 1 (a) 
and 2, the so-called *'X/4 
monopole/' you see that the 
fundamental mode of reso- 
nance is still dipolar, that is, 
{+) to (-). The only difference 
is that the image plane acts 
like the other half of the X/2 
dipole. If you start with the 
situation at 1 (a) and add top 
loadings you can arrive at the 
current distribution at 1(c)* 

Now, what does the im- 
pedance picture look like? In 
each of the three cases, the 
impedance has a high value at 
the top, marked (+), and at 
the dipolar image points, 
marked (-). At the inter- 
mediate position where the 
current is a maximum^ the 
impedance has a minimum 
value - ^^36 Ohms for the 
image plane antenna and ^72 
Ohms for the ideal dipole^ 
Fig. 1{b}. The ideal w^ay to 
feed such an antenna using 



76 



<*} 





r#> 



«*) 



t*^j 



F/^g. L Current distribution on three vertical antennas^ The 
tuned circuit at C simuJates % wavelength. 




52-Ohm coax would Involve 

separating the antenna at a 
point near X, in Fig. 1(c), 
such that the impedance is 52 
Ohms. But how can you 
avoid interaction with the 
shield of the coax? Read on! 

Referring to Fig, 1 (c), con- 
nect the bottom of the 
antenna directly to ground 
(etiminating the generator 
shown). Now assume thai the 
bottom section of the an- 
tenna is in the form of a 
hollow pipe. If you place a 
coaxial feedline inside this 
pipe with the shield con- 
nected to the pipe at the top 
(point X) and the center 
conductor is then connecU'd 
to the insulated top section, 
the fecdpnint impedance, as 
described above, is presented 
across the feedline. If you 
choose the point X at an 
impedance level of 52 Ohms, 
the feedline wilt be exactly 
matched into 52 Ohms, 
resistive. 

Thus, you havej in 

principle, arrived at a reso- 
nant vertical antenna con- 
figuration which has its 
current loop above the 
ground (thereby reducing 
current in the radial system) 
and which presents a perfect 
maich to a low-impedance 
coaxial feedline. As a fringe 
benefit, the base of the an- 
tenna is at ground potential, a 
fact which offers simplified 
mechanical construe tion> 

CONSTRUCTIONAL 
DETAILS 

The Antenna 

Two antennas were con- 



structed following the 
principles outlined above. 
The antenna elements were 
assembled using aluminum 
irrigation pipe, as shown in 
Fig. 3. 

There is, of course^ a wide 
variety of constructional 
material available, but I have 
had such good luck using 
aluminum irrigation pipe for 
support of other antenna 
installations that this was an 
obvious choice in the present 
instance. The two vertical 
antennas were constructed at 
different times — the second 
approximately one year after 
the first. For this reason and 
because i wanted to experi- 
ment with different 
geometries (yielding different 
input impedances), I used 
different lengths of pipe for 
the two antennas> The 
compensating adjustable pa- 
rameter is the coil induc- 
tance. The dimensions used 
for the two antennas are 
shown in Table 1. 

The base section of each 
antenna is a length of three- 
inch-diameter irrigation pipe. 
The top sections are two- 
inch-diameter pipe. The top 
section telescopes inside the 
bottom section for a distance 
of three feet. Insulation is 
provided by PVC pipe 
fittings, as indicated in Fig. 3. 
The sections are anchored in 
position by hose clamps and 
by strategically positioned 
metal screws. Hose clamps are 
also placed at points of high 
stress to strengthen the base 
section. 

The coil support is a 
2^3/4-foot length of PVC pipe 



Fig. 2 The hemisphere of current which flows as a result of 
capacitance of a \!4 vertical radiator to the earth or a radial 
system. At frequencies above 3 MHz, rf currents flow 
primarily in the top few inches of soil, as explained in the text. 
Ground rods are of little value at these frequencies, and spikes 
or large nails are sufficient to secure the outside end of each 
radial wire. With a sufficient number ofradials^ annular wires 
interconnecting the radials offer no Improvement in antenna 
efficiency, as the current path is radial in nature. 



with an i.d. of 2 inches. The 
two-inch aluminum pipe tele- 
scopes Into the ends of the 
PVC a distance of 12 inches, 
leaving a 9-inch length of 
insulation where the coil is 
located. The coil is approx- 
imately three inches long (30 
turns, maximum) to provide 
an excess of turns for tuning 
adjustment. Since the coil fits 



io;r ca WHIP 



loosely over the PVC pipe, it 
is supported by the con- 
necting wires. After experi- 
mentation was completed, 
the coil was wrapped with 
20- inch- wide fiberglass tape 
for additional support and 
protection. 

The Adjustable Top-Loading 
The key enabling device 




CAP (METAL OR PLASTlCl 



2'O.D ALUMINUM 
IftRlGilTlON PIPE 
tLfhieTH CJ 

102" CB WHIP 



PVC PIPE S*i D 2 %m* L0*IG 
COIL (5£e WJTESJ 



2*00 ALUUIMUlri 

iRfilGATKM PI PC fLCN€T>1 ■) 



PVC PiP£ aoajptoh s*i a 



i^C PIPE CAP 2" i D 



5* O AiLlMmuM 
pRRitSflTlOli PTPE (UEMGTH A> 



Fig, 3. Antenna construction details. Notes: CW. — con- 
necting wire to solder lugs; CL — radiator hose clamp; Coil - 
Potycoil 2>^" diameter #/6, W turns per inch^ 



77 



iNT^HNA 



AHTEHHA BASE 

Z* &a STEEL TUB I NO 



f-^O 



CiHOUND SUIf^FACC 



/////////y^///^ 



STEEl. WlAC e^MOIK* 



VST T»«DC SPAC£» SLOCK 




?J/J"IO SrEAM PIPE POST 



Antenna no. 1 
Antenna no. 2 





Dimensions 




CoK 


A 


B 


C 


Turns 


30* 


U%' 


avs' 


20 


20' 


12" 


12' 


12 



POST BASE 

3" D COATED STEEL TUStNO 

LEMOTH 3 

W777777777777Z/ 



tf* DIA PLASTIC Cffi^4lfieil 
FELLED W*rH i:OMCRET£ 



l/Z^ TMI^CK SPACER SU^CK 



FIU.EI) WTIH CiOmCHETf: 



|L«*-30 PUftTED BOLT 



F/jf. 4. Supporting base construction details. 



which makes this antenna 

system practical is the 
method of tuning the radiator 
to resonance from the ground 
level. Usually, a roller 
inductor or other tuning 
method is necessary at the 
base of the antenna, which 
sacrifices mechanical and 
electrical flexibility. Re- 
member, you want to have 
the antenna self- resonant so 
that, in effect, when the feed- 
line is connected, it works 
into a resistive load. 

The desired tuning is 
achieved by means of an ad- 
justable top-loading arrange- 
ment made of two Citizens 
Band whips which project 
from either side of the top of 
the radiator. Lengths of 
nylon cord are attached to 
the ends of these whips and 
pass through awning pulleys 
which are supported from the 
mast by a hose clamp. A 
length of nylon cord runs 
down the mast to the ground 
level. Pulling on this cord 
flexes the whips from the 
horizontal positon to the 
circular configuration shown 
in Fig. 3, thereby producing 
the desired variation of 
capacitance between the top 
of the antenna and ground. 
This adjustment is sufficient 
to cover the entire 75 meter 
phone band without changing 
the coil inductance - a very 
useful capability. 



The Antenna Support 

it was desired that this 
vertical antenna be placed in 

an un guyed position in the 
back lawn of a typical 
suburban lot. Accordingly, a 
21-foot length of 2/^-inch 
(nominal) steam pipe (2-7/8 
inches o*d-) was mounted in 
the ground to serve as a 
supporting post. Inasmuch as 
this was to be an adaptable 
installation for future experi- 
mentation rather than a fixed 
arrangement, the supporting 
pipe was mounted in such a 
manner that it could be re- 
moved without disturbing the 
buried system of radial 
ground wires. This was 
achieved by telescoping the 
supporting post into a three- 
foot length of three-inch* 
diameter coated steel tubing 
buried in the vertical position 
as shown in Fig* 4, 

It Will be seen that the 
antenna is pivoted at the base 
on a 5/16Hnch-diametcr bolt 
which passes through a length 
of two-inch-diameter steel 
tubing, which is attached to 
the base for the supporting 
post. This lubing, which 
projects approximately four 
inches above the ground 
surface, is assembled against 
the post base to form a rigid 
assembly before being cast in 
concrete as shown. Thus, 
when completed, this 
assembly forms a rigid buried 



Tabfe L Antenna dimensions. 



support structure, made of 
the antenna mounting base 
and the post mounting base. 
The supporting post Is raised 
to the vertical position and 
then lowered into the pipe 
base to complete the antenna 
supporting structure; this is a 
twoman job. 

Antenna Erection 

As shown in Fig. 4, the 
antenna is pivoted at the base 
on a 5/16~inch-diametcr bolt. 
The antenna can be "walked 
up" — easily by two men or 
with greater strain by one 
(young) man. If 1 am that one 
man, I prefer to use a rope 
hoist* After erection, the 
antenna is held rigidly in 
place by two hose clamps 
which are tightened around 
the antenna and the 
supporting pipe. 

The coaxial feed line passes 
upward through the antenna, 
and its shield is connected to 
the tower section of the 
radiator, both at the feed- 
point and, by means of a 
length of flexible braid, at the 
base of the radiator. Herej it 
is connected to the center of 
the system of ground radiais. 
The coaxial cable is then 
buried so that it becomes a 
part of the radial image plane. 

The Image Plane 

Sevick and others have 
shown that a large number of 
ground radials is required if 
an effective image plane is to 
be achieved in localities 
where the soil has but modest 
electrical conductivity. 

Guided by this previous 
work and by the dimensions 
of the available plot, I chose 
to use for each vertical 
radiator 73 radials (5^ radials 

pius the coaxial feed line), 
each having an approximate 
length of one-quarter wave* 
length. The image plane took 
the fonm shown schematically 
in Fig, 5. For clarity, not all 
of the wires are shown in the 
sketch. Since this vertical 



system was superimposed 
over the grid of parallel 
g^^ound wires (spaced ten feet 
apart) which were used for 
the horizontal phased array ,^ 
the image plane is connected 
to this grid by soldered cross- 
overs at the median grid wire, 
as shown. 

ADJUSTMENTS 
Resonance 

After erection of the 
vertical radiators and com- 
pletion of the image plane 
installation, it is only neces- 
sary to adjust the system to 
resonance. This is accom- 
plished by means of a noise 
bridge. The two feedlines 
were first trimmed to an 
electrical length of one wave- 
length at the operating fre- 
quency (3-955 MHz). Since 
the feed line is an integral 
multiple of half waves, the 
measurements are as if made 
at the antenna feed points 
directly. The noise bridge was 
connected at one antenna 
input, while the other an- 
tenna was terminated in a 
52-Ohm resistive load. The 
resonant frequency is 
measured by detection of the 
nuli of the noise bridge. This 
resonant frequency is then 
altered by pulling the rope 
which flexes the whips at the 
top of the antenna. For 
example, if the measured 
resonant frequency is too 
high, the whips are extended 
more, thereby lowering the 
resonance point. If there is, at 
first, not enough range in this 
adjustment, the antenna is 
lowered and the number of 
coil turns is increased. Once 
the desired resonant fre- 
quency is attained, this 
antenna is terminated while 
the other radiator is adjusted, 
A slight ^'tweaking'* of the 
first antenna now completes 
the adjustments. 

Matching 

Referring to Table 1, it is 
seen from a comparison of 



78 




Fig. 5. 



dinrtenstons that probably the 
feedpoint impedance of 
antenna no. 1 will be greater 
than that of antenna no, 2, 
This is surmised because, 
viewed as a di pole-image 
antenna system, this feed- 
point is probably further off 
center than is that for 
antenna no* 2. This proves to 
be the case — noise bridge 
measurements indicate this 
feedpoint resistance of no. 1 
to be 70 OhmSj whereas that 
for configuration no. 2 
measures 40 Ohms, Rather 
than change the antenna 
dimensions to realize an input 
resistance of 52 Ohms for 
each, it is simpler to utilize 
broadband toroidal transr 
formers to match each 



antenna to the 52-Ohm 
source. 

Since the frequency used 
Is relatively low, the trans- 
formers were wound with 15 
turns of zip cord on a 2-inch- 
diameter toroidal form 
(T*200). These units were 
connected in the autotrans- 
former mode, and, for each, 
the tap was adjusted 
empirically using the noise 
bridge. Residual inductance 
was tuned out using series 
capacitors. The details for 
these transformer connec* 
tions are shown in Fig. 6. The 
input resistances were each 
adjusted to 50 Ohms. 

Operation 

This antenna system has 



been operated as a two- 
element phased array using 
the same delay-line switching 
manifold as has been used 
with the horizontal system,^ 

Electrically, the operation 
is as expected. Swrs are below 
1,1 for all combinations of 
the radiators. The front-io- 
baek ratios are consistently 
above 10 decibels. The 
phasing is monitored by the 
Lissajous pattern on an oscil- 
loscope, The in-phase, quad- 
rature, and 45"" patterns are 
as expected. 

As mentioned earlier, de- 
tailed comparisons with the 
horizontal array are planned* 
Preliminary results indicate 
that, for short-distance {out 
to fifteen mifes) ground wave, 
the vertical system is con- 
sistently stronger For dis- 
tances out to about 200 
miles, the horizontal system 
is substantially stronger^ For 
distances greater than 200 
miles, the vertical system is 
stronger only if propagation 
conditions are favorable* It is 
my feeling that this will be 
strongly dependent upon the 
sun spot cycle. It would 
appear that the tow-angje 
refraction for this relatively 
long wavelength radiation 
may depend upon the 
"smoothness" of the iono- 
sphere, tf this is true, one 
might expect inferior per- 
formance of the low-angle 
(vertical) system during sun- 
spot lows when the ionization 
is *Yough/' producing exces- 
sive scattering during the 
oblique-angle refraction. As 
the sunsDot cvcle imnroves. 






-Ji— 




^AHJ HO 2 



my 






->1*|T NO 



W' 



m 



Fig. 6. Toroidal matcfiing 
transformers. 

one would expect the ioniza- 
tion to be more uniform^ or 
'"smoother," so that the low- 
angle antenna system would 
come into its own, perhaps 
producing substantially 
stronger signals than the 
h igher-angle horizontal 
system. If this proves to be 
true, it would explain much 
of the conflicting data which 
has been reported down 
through the years regarding 
the effectiveness of vertical 
antenna systems on 75 
meters. ■ 



References 

!• ^'The Mobiloop/' J, E. Tayfor, 
QST, Movember, 1968. 

2. ^'A Lovy-Frequencv Phased 
Arrav," J. E. Taylor, 73, July, 
1974. 

3. 'The W2FMI Ground^Mount- 
ed Short Vertical/' J. Sevick, 
QST. March, 1973, 

4. "Top-Loaded Vertical for 80 
Meters/' H. G. ElwtlJ, Jr„ Ham 
Radio, September, 1971. 

5. "Artother Look at Reflec- 
tions/' M, W, Maxwell. OST, 
Apriri974. 



* 4 







1 rmirTTT Tna^ yoi; 




q V* p 1^ V. r» Vji 



from f>3ge 75 

power (5 Waits], because it was 
all I could afford, and nearly 
quit amateur radio, I guess I 
could fill page after page about 
lost contacts and no contacts 
because of QRM from the really 



"strong" stations on nearby 
frequencies. 

ft seems like this letter has 
started one way and is headed 
somewhere else, but the point 
isr "How can the average per- 
son afford an A-l radio 
station?*' 



I enjoy amateur radio. I Know 
it is growing because there are 
more hams in our area than 
there have ever been. With this 
growth, there have been grow- 
ing pains. I have some sugges- 
tions for helping; 

1. Manufacturers are putting 
more and more into each radio. 
Why not start with a radio that 
is one band (40 meters) and 
operates GW onty? Then, as the 
amateur progresses, the radio 
would have add-on accessories 
to increase the number of 
bands and add SSB and other 
such Items to upgrade the 
equipment. 

2, Why don't they allocate band 
segments for iow^power (QRPp) 



use? 

These things witi not solve 
aii the problems of amateur 
radio, but I feel that they would 
help the Novice operator in two 
ways: He will be able to afford 
the equipment to operate and 
he will therefore retain his in- 
terest in amateur radio. 

Maybe somebody agrees 
wHh me— maybe not. Anyway, 
I've said it and I believe it. 

Lewis M. Todd WB5SYP 
Natchez MS 

rd be interested in letters from 
readers with ideas on how to 
work DX without spending a tot 

Continued on p9ge B3 



79 



The Full Spectrum of VHF 



SCR 1000 • Standard of Compatison 
In Repeaters • Now AvailaMe with Jhitopatch! 




2M 

& 

220llimml 



Opthona) Cabinet 
$130-00 



180 Day Warranty 



The SCR1000/SCAP Combination 



A New 



Dimension in Autopatch Repeater Performance 




Now Spec Comm has talien the hassle out of putting ^n 
autopatch repeater on the air! The SCR1000/SCAP is a 
fully self-contained 30 watt repeater with built-in 
autopatch and land line control. You simply plug in 
the phone line, hook up the duplexer, and you're on 
the air! The usual nnonths of problems are eliminated! 
The SCR1000/SCAP has been meticulously engineered 
to provide the smoothest performing patch together 
with a positive land line control of the repeater. Just 
look at all these features: 



Undm^ chassis view of SCHIOOQ with Autopatch mstaft&d. 



yeatu^ted' 



Normal patch, or secure "reverse" patch 

3 digit anti-falsing access — singte digit dJs^ 

connect 

3 digit on-oft control of repeater transmitter 

4 sec. time limit on access 



Built-in adjustabte time-out function — patch 
shuts down in 30*90 sec, if no carrier is received 
Wide range AGC on audfo input and output 
User can mute phone line audio simply by key- 
ing his mic button — prevents embarrassing 
language from being repeated 
Patch access and repeater control — either 
over the air or over the land line 



The SCR 1000/SCAP is a complete Autopatch Repeater — fully assembled, set-up and checked- 

out in our lab. As with all Spec Comm products, all workmanship and components are of the very 
highest quality. The price? A very reasonable $1585.00 complete with FL-6 Receiver Pre- 
selector ($2080 W/WP641 Duplexer). Get your order in A.S.A.P. 



Cat( or write today and gst the detaifs! 




SPECTRUM 



1055 W. Germantown Pk,,i 



80 



m. 

/FM Repeater Equipment — 

Quattiy Steaks For Itself! 

See what our customers have to say about the SCR lOOi^ 



", , , The QiiBfity of the audio fs ynbeitev^ifio — ^ true reproducffon of fftw in- 
pitf. it twsfff tfoes sound iike simpfe* The /ccfl/vef sBnsirivity of our Spec- 
ffum syst0fT} is m least twice fft# Motorois system we had in service. W^ 
have 24 Wans out of oar dupfeiier W9 ait have fafien in fove with yoitr 
machine . , Agam, thank you tor an eMC^fl^nf piece of equipment. We arm 
ceratiniy giad that we purchased a Specfn/m 1000 Repeater** 

Jim Wood W3WJK 
Mars^ PA 1€046 



"You ftav© a prx^duct that mom fftan meets The specfficattons ygo claim 
in the recet¥er you ha^e a wmrwr, the intarmod is negi/gitfe . . . We havm 
many ortmr repeaters both amateur and commercial in the area and as ot yet 
no prottem . . .in c/osmg, I wfottfd tika to thank fou tor producing m product 
that does what is anpected of it. tn thta world one setdom gats what he pay$ 
for; i feet our group has i>ougfti and received our monays worth.** 

Jim Todd WA5HTT 
Dallas TK 



*'Th^ reCGivar i& exceffant: typicaity, it a 25- watt mobiie c^n hear the 
m&t?hin& (running tOQ watts out ot the dupiexerh he can get into it That's 
f^etty good, f must say, A it hough i'm on a l&kHz "£fif inter" ti&tween two 
BtQ rapaaters, we don't have any odlecent'Char)nei pwtt&ms with the 
SCRIOOO's receiver. .. aithough the "hcai' 19/79 group has headaches 
from their repe&ter's recsfver whenever a mobtta operating 146,205, (our 



freq.L in th^ir area k^ys up. And their machine is tofatiy "commercist"! 
Neadtess to say, the audio queiffy of the SCRIOQO is pretty spectacular. 
Switching from input to output, even Melissa Manchester can't teii the dif- 
ference — and neither can i" 

S. KaU WB2WIK 



• The SCRIOOO — simply the finest repeater available on the amateur market . . . and often compared to "commercial" units selling for 3 times 
the price! This is a 30WL unit, with a very sensitive & selective receiver Included is a built-in AC Supply, CW IDer, full metering and lighted status 
indicator/control push-buttons, crystals, local mic, etc. Also provided are jacks for emergency power, remote control, autopatch, etc. 

• A full complement of options are available: Touchtone^'^ control OupJexers, Cable, 'PL^ HI/LO Power, Autopatch, Racks, etc. Please Inquire 

• The Spec Comm Repeater System a sound investment . . . available only by direct factory order. S1 035.00 w/FL-6 ($950 .00 w/'o FL-6). 



SPEC COMM REPEATER BOARDS, SUB-ASSEMBLIES & ACCESSORIES 



All equipment assembled & tested. For 2M & 220 MHz, 




SCRIOO Rec«iver Board 

• Wtde dynamic ran gel Greatly reduces 
overload, desense', and tM. 

• Sens. 0,3uV/'£OdB Qt 

« Set 6dB <e^ ^ 6.5 KHz, -90dB m ± 30KH;i, 
(llOdB w/opl. 6 Pose Fltr.) 
Exc. audio quality? Fast squelch 1 4115.00 w/)(tal. 
Aad *te.95 for G Pole Fltr. 

SCR 100 fteceivaf Assembly 

• SCBICO mounted in snield^ hio using 

• Sarrm as us«d on SCRIOOO 

• Completely ASmbld. w/FT. caus. S0239 conn.. 
Af GAIN POT, etc- $185-00 

TftA4 TIrnar Ha&«l Annunciatof Board 

• Puts out ». tone "be«p" on rptr. xmtr ap)(. 1 MC. 
artar rcrvfl. s^jnal drops — ttfus allowing lime 
tor breakers 

• Resets rptr. ym&oul timer when torve is emitted 

• Adjustable time delay and tone duration 

• Typi^^llr u^ed with CTCICX) and 10100 

• 120.95 (Add SI 8.00 for Inst. & cK. ou! In 
SCRIOOO^ 

CTC100 COR/T I mar/Control Board 

• Complete COR circuitry 

• Carrier 'Hang' & T.O, Timers 

• Remote xmlr. control 

• 100% SoJJd State CMOS logic 

• Many other tealures $35.00 




FL-6 Rcwr. Front-End FlUer/Preamp 

• Low-noise praam p combined with 6 section 
ntter 

• Provides tremendous reject ion of "out-of- 
band" signals 

9 EKUemely helpful at sites with many nearby 
transmitters 

• Gain; apK. l2dB 

• Seleciivity: -20dB ® ±2M MHz; -eOdB @ ±5 
MK2 (typ.> 

• %8MQ 




SCAP Autopatch Board 

Provides all baBic autopatch functions 
See features on opposite page. $225.00 

RPCM Bo«rd 
Used w/SCAP board to provide "Reverse Patch* 
and land-line control ot rptr^ 
Includes land line " answering'^ clrcuttry. $79.96 



COMMUNICA TIONS 



^dl\ 



4 




mM:^ 




SCT 110 Xititr/Exqller Bo«rd 

• 7 or 10 WtS, Output 

• Infinite VSWR proof 

• True FM lor exc. audio quality 

• New Design — specifically for continuous rptr. 
service 

• Very low in "white noise" 
« Spurious '70d8 

« With .00OS% xial. $135.00 

• BA' 10 30 vyt Amp board k Heal Sink. 3 Sec. LPF 
& rel- pwr.^ SflnsOf. $51.95 

SCT1 10 Transminer Assefnblf 

• SCT110 mounted m sriielded i^ousing 

• Same as used on SCR1000 

m Completely asm bid w/F.T. caps, S0239 conn 

• ? Of to Wl unW |199,9S, Add $6S,00 fof 30 Wt. unit 

WP$41 DupiexBf 
« Superior Band PassiBand Reject design 

• Pfovides great rejection of "out-ot- band" 
Signals 

• Extremely easy to ad}u&t 

• -93dB !yp- isolation. $496.00 {tmf cJ«J. out 
w/SCR lOOO). 2RG9 Cables: ^^.00. 

I02S0 ID i Audio lllxer Board 

• Adjustable ID tone, speed, tevel timing cycle 

• 4 Input AF Mixer k Local Mic amp 
» COR input & xmir. hold 

• CMOS logtc; PROM memory— 250 bits 

• Up to 4 different ID channels! 

• Many other features. Programmed $65.00 
(1 Chan.) 

• Local MIc: $15.95 



Send for Data Sheets! 

(ShipJHandl. — $3.50. PA residenis add 6% fax) 

Worristown PA 19401 (215) 631-1710 



marm 



sa 



Mijg—t' 



81 



Bin Des/ardins WIZY/LAQBP 
Hegg&velen 17b 
1431 Li 
Norway 



Phased Verticals 
For Easy DX 



and under $20! 



Congratulations! Your 
General ticket has final- 
ly arrived from the FCC gods. 
Now you can operate those 
segments on 80^ 40, 15^ and 
10. But most interesting is 
the privilege of operating on 
the 20 meter band. 

After a few days of listen- 
ing to the most interesting 
HF band, you will notice the 
following: Most of the boys 
who really work DX well will 
not be using a dipole. The 
most common antenna in this 
group is the famous three- 
element beam. 



<( 



Now, you will think, 
Boy, rd really like a three- 
element beam! How much is 
one? Oh, that much?! ... 



kSO' PNASE SHIFT 



How much used? . , . That's 
just as bad! I'm a General 
with a Novice^s bankbook, I 
can't pay that much! What 
I'd like is a nice inexpensive 
antenna which performs nice- 
ly on DX, say, for under 
twenty dollars. Fd like it to 
be easy to construct and op- 
erate/' 

Obviously, if you've taken 
a look at the prices for alumi- 
num tubing, a three-element 
home brew yagi isn't the eco- 
nomical answer. And the 
neighbors might not appreci- 
ate a quad, if these two re- 
strictions apply to you, my 
antenna is for you. 

Tm talking about a pair of 
phased verticals. This antenna 
has a 3 dB gain over a dipole. 

0* PHASE SHIFT 






Lll 




Fig. /. 



(Doesn*t even this amount of 
gain outperform those "bar- 
gain yagis'7) The main angle 
of radiation is vertical —very 
important for DX worL The 
directivity is bidirectional, in 
two directions- As an added 
attraction, the beam heading 
can be changed by 90"^, This 
is done by phasing cables, but 
more on that later. 

The Theory Behind the 
Antenna 

As the name suggests, the 
phased verticals system uti- 
lizes two identical vertical ra- 
diators, which are either out 
of phase by 180"^, thus pro- 
ducing the radiation pattern 
shown in Fig, 1 (a), or are 
exactly in phase, producing 
the radiation pattern shown 
in Fig. 1 (b). It can be said 
that the antenna can beam in 
four directions. For example, 
in Fjg, 1(a), the verticals are 
lined up with the north, so 
you have the beam headings 
N/S. You can also select the 
pattern shown in Fig. 1 (b), 
E/W. 

The Coaxial Harnesses 

1. See Fig. 2{a). The 180° 
phasing section of coax (piece 



of coax which creates the 
phase shift between the two 
verticals) is connected be- 
tween each vertical. The 
length is ViX on the operating 
frequency* for a phase shift 
of 180°. Another piece, any 
length, is connected to either 
vertical and run Into the 
shack, 

2. Sec Fig. 2{b],The phas- 
ing section of coax is con- 
nected between each vertical, 
as before, but the length is 
now 1\ on the operating fre- 
quency.* This will provide a 
phase shift of 0"^, or, in other 
v^ords, the Vertkafs will be in 
phase, 

3, For more elaborate 
systems, run two lines of 
coax, equal in lengthy from 
each vertical to the shack. 
Then you may either add a 
ViK * piece of coax in one 
line, as in Fig. 3(a), fbr a 
1 80 phase shift, or add noth- 
ing and connect the two lines 
then and there^ for a phase 
shift of (f, as in Fig. 3{b). 
The advantages of this system 
are that you may select the 
phase shift between the verti- 
cals and, therefore, the beam 
heading from the convenience 
of the operating position. 

Erection of the Antenna 

Any vertical antenna sys- 
tem should be used against a 
good ground system. The 
easiest way to achieve a 
ground system on a roof is to 
lay a system of radial s (wires 
running out from the base of 
the antenna on the roof). For 
this antenna, the length of 
the radiators should be 1 7' 7*' 
for best performance at 14,2 
MM/., The antenna will oper- 
ate both ends of the 20 meter 
band with the 17' 7'' radials. 
Anywhere from 4 radiais to 
120 and up are acceptable. 
The antennas at LA(}BP each 
have 7 radiais. (The perfor- 
mance is quite good.} The 
radiais should be laid out 
with the same angle between 
them (i,e., for 4 radiais, the 
angle between should be 90 , 
for 6 radiais the angle should 
be 360/6 - 60^ etc.). This is 

*Keep the velocitv factor \n mind 
HA/hen cutting for RG-5S/U or 
RG-8/U. 



82 



just a recommendation, and, 
if it is impractical to follow, 
it can be disregarded. Since 
each radiai is 1 T 7" and the 
antennas are spaced at about 
five meters, the possibiHty of 
2 radials overlapping {one 
from each vertical) is good. If 
this is the case, by all means 
splice the two together. This 
should increase the size of the 
ground system for both verti- 
cals. 

Construction 

When getting together the 
materials for this project, I 
was careful to use very easily 
obtainable materials. I think I 
achieved this goal with some 
to spare. 

The two verticals are iden- 
tical in every respect The 
vertical radiators are mounted 
on base boards, each board a 
four-foot 2" X 3". The 
"pipe'* is fastened to the 
boards by cable straps spaced 
every six inches for three 
feet. (Heavy-duty brads are a 
good substitute for the cable 
straps.) 

Nov^ that ^ach radiator is 
mounted on its own board, 
the next step is to mount all 
the other components wher- 
ever there is room. The coil 
should be mounted as close 
to the bottom of the radiator 
as possible, and an eyebolt 
(woodscrew type) should be 
placed six inches below the 
coil. At the bottom of the 
radiator, there should be a 
low-resistance clamp. A pos- 
sibility is to use a properly 
si?ed hose clamp. 

The next step is to solder 
one end of the coil to the 



ISO* SHIFT 



1/43*, 






LI 



y« 



0* SHifT 



\MX 



l/E )i COAX 



■TO RADJAU5 




SELECtABLE* SHIFT 



\/AX 



Li 



m 

TO 
TRANSMITTER 



■U COAX- 



rr> 



TO RAOIALS- 



■L1 



the: two coaxial 

CABLES MU&T be 
THE SAME LEt+GTH 



fh 



"i , 




to 

TRANSMrTTER 



TO J I 



TO RADIALS - 



TO J2 




Fig, 2(a), 

radiator. Now the verticals 
are ready for mounting. 

When mounting this sys- 
tem, the general rule of "the 
higher the better" applies. 
But if the optimum condition 
of a small, flat area of a roof 
is not obtainable^ the system 
is perfectly at home on the 
ground. Give it a try! 

The most important factor 
to keep in mind when selec- 
ting a place to mount is to 
keep the verticals KX apart 
Try to keep this as close to 
VaK as practical. Again, if !4X 
is not practicable, give what- 
ever is practical a try! 

Coaxial Wiring 

The actual coaxial wiring 
should be delayed until the 
verticals are in their perma- 
nent berth. Then the line 
from the system (either verti- 
cal) to the shack can be cus- 
tom cut To be sure of accu- 
racy, have the phasing section 
precut before you go up on 
the roof. Sometimes you 



Fig. 2(b). 



Fig, 2(c). 



i|| 



t 



1/2 !i COAX 
(COILED UP|i 





Jl 



I I 



^ 



% 



t^ 



%I5 
TO 

XMTfi 



Fig. 3(a), 



r? 



don't get an accurate Ifength 
when you are worrying about 
falling. If you want to be 
sure, cut the phasing section 
inside. 

Since the center of the 
coaxiai cable is directly con- 
nected to the coil, the coax 
should be tacked down to the 
baseboard to lessen the strain 
on the coax-to-coti connec- 
tion. Don't forget to connect 
the coaxial shields to the re- 



Fig 3(b), 

maining side: of the coil along 
with the radiatsi 

Conclusion 

After four months of use 
at LA(JBP, we found a lOdB 
improvement in signal 
strength over the dipole. 
Also, with the beam lobes 
pointing at E/NE and S/SW, 
many Japanese stations have 
been worked along with VS6s 
and VKs. ■ 



Parts List 

2 four-foot lengths of 2" x 3" stock or equivalent 

24 heavy-duty cable straps or brads 

2 five-meter pipes, %" in diameter or larger (afuminum, 

Steel, or copper) 

2 coil forms, 1" in diameter (6-173 turns, 6 turns per inch] (LI) 

2 woo d sc r e w ey e bo i ts 

1 approximately 120' of #20 or larger vvire (radials) 

1 required length of RG^5S/U or RG-S/U 




about anything they really 
want. Our recent reader poll 
showed that the average 73 
reader spent almost $1,000 /asf 
year on ham gear . . , and that's 
an average/ Perhaps I should 
write more about ways to use 
your ham smarts to make 
money . . . other than writing 
articles for 73. — Wayne. 



Contfrtu^d on pag& 79 

of money. One good way is to 
stick toCW . , . some of the top 
certificate hunters and QSL 
nuts are running relatively low 
power and making out just fine. 
Until such time as manufac- 



turers are able to make enough 
experisive equipment to sat- 
urate tiie demand, I suspect 
they will continue to concen- 
trate on it. On the other hand, 
with it being so simple to make 
extra money, a fair percentage 
of the hams are able to buy just 



CREDIT WHERE DUE 



Many high schools in the 
country have amateur radio 
clubs as extracurricuiar ac- 
tivities, and many of these 
clubs offer code and theory 



classes to thefr members. 
Beginning in September of 
1978, we at Cedar Cliff High 
School in Camp Hill, Penn- 
sylvania, will be trying 
something which may be of in- 
terest to you and any teachers 
who are a J so hams. 

A few months ago, Tom 
Rutland K3IPW and I came up 
with the idea that amateur 
radio need not be restricted to 
the ranks of extracurricular ac- 
tivities. H is a known fact that 
many people end up rn certain 
vocations due to theJr mvolve- 
ment with amateur radio. We 
used this fact to propose that a 

Continued on page 86 



83 



Karl T. Thurber, Jr. W8FX/4 
2Z3 Newcastle Lans 
Montgomery AL 36117 



Modernize 
the Matchbox! 



increased capability 
for a classic coupler 



coax 

INPUT 



T^ 






^ 



t^^ 




r 



HECtlVER. 



UNUSED 4= 

lT-0 LINEAR SW.]*>- — 



RECEIVER 



#-4- 



I RYI 



H 



L_. 



€.3 VAC 



^ 






V.*- 




"SINGL£ WIRE TERM 



r-— — ej) 

so- £3^ 



£-W(RE LIME tlLI^M 



^ 



GftOUND 

TEFiMIHAL 



01 



eOOOA 



I- 



ADJ 



1U>UA 



01 



^^ 






s 



PI 



^ 



P2- 



TO 

DIRECTIONAL 

COUPLER 



P3- 



DIRECTIONAL COUPLER 
IN&ICATOft l-NSTi^LLEO 
m MATCHBOX 



Hg. /. Matchbox showing added components^ Relay ^ RYh shown in the transmit position; 
Bandswitch, SWl, shown in 80 meter position, *Coax output, additional 6.3 Vac transformer 
added. 



Certain pieces of ham gear 
simply never become 
outdated, becoming classics 
in their own right. They are 
items which it is wise to keep 
For their all-round utiMtarian 
value. One of these ts the 
Johnson Viking Matchbox. 

The Matchbox series of 
antenna couplers was intro- 
duced in the mid-fifties to 
match practically any an- 
tenna impedance and line 
configuration (open wire, 
coax, or single wire) to a 50- 
to 75-Ohm transmitter and 
receiver. The 275-Watt and 
1-kW models were produced, 
both with and without swr 
indicators. (Very similar units 
are available today from Nye 
Viking,) The Matchbox is a 
real gem^ being capable of 
matching balanced lines of 50 
to 1200 Ohms and un- 
balanced loads of 50 to 2000 
Ohms, with an ability to tune 
out large amounts of reac- 
tance, the amount depending 
upon the line or antenna re- 
sistance and frequency. 

Dating from my Novice 
days in 1955, I had an old, 
beat-up 275-Watt box (with 
5Wr bridge) which had seen 
much, much hard service and 
was in definite need of reno- 
vation- The first step in re- 
habilitating the unit was to 
clean up the cabinet interior 
and exterior (who needs a 
maroon cabinet?), remove ail 
hardware, and carefully spray 
the cabinet with a dull-gloss 
gray enamel. The meter in my 
unit had seen better days, so I 
replaced it with a high-quality 
100 uA meter obtained from 
a local surplus house for less 
than $4. 

I also have a Tempo 2020 
transceiver in use, meaning 
that the receive-transmit 
switching feature of the 
Matchbox is not required* 
Therefore, 115 V ac is con- 
tinuously applied to the 
Matchbox T/R relay, when- 
ever station power is applied, 
to lock the unit in the trans- 



84 



f 



-f^a E 



& 5VAC -i RYI 



^ 



I 



SO- 239 



MATCHBOX OUT 



TRANSCEIVER 



rri 



ar^ 



S0-23S 



_f {I{^~r\ \ TO IKPUT Of 
^^ US—*' ^ MATCHSOX 



rti 



ANTENMfl(S3 OR 
COJix SWITCH 



MATCHBOX OUT 
IN 



r7^ 



0( 



uy 



1 ^TO OLJTPUT OF 



frfATCHeax 



Fig. 2. P & H Model AR-1 linear switch. *2- or 3-posltion coax 
switch may be Insta/led to allow antenna or gntenno/dummy 
load selection. ^'*' Allows selection of straight-through 
operation or routing antenna/dummy load through Matchbox 
coupler. (SWl Is an internal part of the P & H switch and Is 
front-panel mounted*) 




mit mode. This also provides 
a source of 115 V ac inside 
the Matchbox for another 
purpose - see Fig, 1. 

I have long possessed an- 
other classic, an old P & H 
Model AR-1 linear amplifier 
in/out switch, a handy little 
coax-switching box con- 
taining a 63 V ac relay. It is 
designed to provide selection 
of linear amplif1er/'*straight- 
through barefoot'' operation. 
The unit can be provided 
with 6.3 V ac power from a 
small filament-type trans- 
former mounted inside the 
Matchbox, receivmg its power 
from the 115 V ac going to 
the T/R relay. The P & H unit 
is mounted atop the Match- 
box and js used to provide 
tuner *'fn" and *'out" 
switching. A coax switch^ 
mounted at the antenna input 
coax connector of the P & H 
switch; allows switching of 
multiple antennas and/or a 
dummy load, either directly 
to the transceiver or through 



the Matchbox. Fig. 2 shows 
the diagram of the P & H 
linear switch. 

If such a handy gadget as 
the P & H ART unit is not 
available, there is sufficient 
room inside the Matchbox to 
install a DPDT ceramic trans- 
mitting-typc rf switch to per- 
form the Matchbox in/out 
switching. This would elimi- 
nate the need for the 6.3 V ac 



transformer which powers the 
P & H switch. A 2- or 3- 
position rotary rf switch can 
also be installed to select 
between antennas and/or a 
dummy load, if there is no 
objection to drilling the 
panels to install the rotary 
switches and additional 
coaxial connectors. {If the 
remote directional coupler is 
bolted onto the rear apron, 
blocking much of the rear 
pane! space, the rotary selec- 



tor switches would have to be 
mounted on the front or side 
panels.) 

Fig. 3 shows the overall 
station rf wiring at my instal- 
lation. 

The resultant combination 
Is rather satisfying and very 
versatile and is quite similar 
to the features of the Drake 
MN-4 Tuner, but with wide- 
range impedance matching 
capabilities. ■ 



MATCHBOX BY-PASS HM^OUT 



Pe^H LINEAR 
IN/OUT SWITCH" 

3-POS COAX S'H 






AWT 



-M- 



iNTEI4NA C-PLR 
iOOHMSON ViKINft] 
WATCHBO)( VtflTH 
5-WR BRiDSe 



**4- 



AhiTE^INA PHEAMF 
lAMECO PT> 



SWft BRIDGE IN 
HEtTH SB-650- 
STATION CONSOLE 



O: 
> 



i9 



q- 



fS 



LOW-PASS FILTER 
IJOHNSON £50--£Di 



TRANSCEIVER 
(TtWPC Z02OJ 



MONITOR SCOPE 
IHEATH &fl-ftlOi 



DUMMY Lt^AD 
& WATTMETER 
[HEATH HM-2103] 



AUX RECEIVER 
[YAESH FRG-T) 



Fig. 3. Author's rf station wiring. "^See text for details. 



mu p:oon^ dr., r 



r^v *■ 



i^roji : 




i I ^.*■ : :- * .;. I 






from page 83 

new course be offered in our 
schooTs curriculum and, for 
the first time during the 1978-79 
school yB3Lr, we w\\\ offer a 
course entitled "Amateur 
Radio, 



1 1 



^7 u 



The course will meet for two 
class periods per week 
(47-nninu1e periods) and will run 
for the entire school year. All 
students completing tt 
successfully will receive 2/5 
credit toward their graduation 
requirements. (A class meeting 



5 periods per week for the en- 
tire year Is worth 1 credit 
toward graduation.) All 
students will be given the 
Novice exam at the end of the 
first semester and, hopefully, 
many will progress to the 
Technician or General licenses 
by the end of the second 
semester. 

We have budgeted for and 
expect to be using Heath equip- 
ment and the 73 code tapes and 
study guides. 

Anyone wishing information 
on the structure of the course 
and our results with it can con- 
tact me at the school. 

Fred D. Smith, Jr. K3M0A 

Camp Hill PA 



PERCENTAGE PLAV 



In your March, 1978, 
editoriai, you ask why hams 
fee! a responsibility to get in- 
volved in cleaning up CB while 
we show no interest in CAP or 
the police frequencies. In the 
recent ARRL survey, half of all 
hams responding indicated 
that they are also CBers. I'm 
sure your 73 poll is producing 
similar results. I am confident 
that a similar survey would 
show that the number of hams 
who are policemen or CAP 
members is tiny by compar- 



Contmued on page 87 



85 



Donald A GhappeU W2ilZD 
4B Winnie Lane 
Foughkeepsie NY 12603 



The Miserly Magnetic 

Antenna 



make this sausage-can magnetic mount 



DO you recognize one of 
these problems? 
You just got a new 2 
meter rig or finished building 
that Hot Water 202 and are 
anxious to go mobile. YouYe 
going mobile with that 
handie-talkie and want some- 
thing better than the rubber 



ducky. Your rig is normally 
in a second car, but you're 
going on vacation in the 
family car and are looking fbr 
a temporary 2m antenna to 
work those repeaters across 
country. Perhaps your prob- 
lem is the need for a mobile 
antenna until you can make 




'MflGNEt WITH MAGNET *ITH SlWGLE HOLE- 

FORMED EARS "^ USING SPACERS 





Fig. h Sausage-can anlenna. 



up your mind whether it's 
going to be a 5/8A or a 
collinear and where to mount 
it Maybe you just don't want 
to drill holes in your car. 

Whatever the problem, the 
solution could be the sausage- 
can antenna for 2 meters* 

As a 1/4X vertical groun{t 
plane antenna, it performs 
well The swr will be accept- 
able from 146 to 148 MHz 
utilizing the instructions 
following, and, with a little 
cut and try, it can be reduced 
to LI :1, This is a construc- 
tion project* The design is 
very basic and can be verified 
using an antenna book. 

So often^ it seems, con- 
struction projects make state- 
ments about costs in relation 
to whales in your junk box. 
Now, no two junk boxes are 
the same, and some hams lack 
the experience or knowledge 
to substitute. The building of 
the sausage-can antenna will 
only cost a couple of dollars 
even if you must buy all the 
materials. 

Obtain the following: 
one 5 oz. aluminum can of 
Armour Vienna Sausage from 



the supermarket; 
two cabinet door magnetic 
latches from the hardware 
store; 

one coaxial connector, chassis 
type^ SO-239 from Radio 
Shack; 

one 19-inch piece of music 
(piano) wire from a hobby 
shopj or one 19-inch piece of 
brass welding rod from an 
auto supply or repair shop; 
screws and nuts and/or alumi- 
num pop rivets, as required, 
from the hardware store; 
spacers (if needed) from the 
hardware store. 

Open the can of sausage, 
discard the lid, and eat the 
sausage (it's about time for a 
cold beer, also). Wash and dry 
the can. Drill a 3/4-inch hole 
in the center of the bottom 
of the can to accommodate 
the SO-239 connector. 

Temporarily insert the 
threaded end of the con- 
nector into the can from the 
outside. Using ihe connector 
as a template, center punch 
the four connector mounting 
holes* Set aside the con- 
nector and drill the four 
1/8-inch holes which you just 
marked in the can. 

If your magnetic latches 
have mounting ears, bend the 
ears to conform to the inside 
of the can. For latches with a 
single mounting hole in the 
center, a couple of spacers 
will be required between the 
latch and the can to prevent 
distorting the shape of the 
can. 

Magnetically attach the 
two latches to a narrow iron 
straightedge at approximately 
the distance apart equal to 
the inside diameter of the 
can. Lower the latches into 
the can with the straightedge 
resting across the rim. Adjust 
the latches so that the flat 
sides of the latches touch the 
inside wall of the can 180 
degrees apart Using an ice 
pick, mark the center of the 
latch-mounting holes with 
sufficient pressure so that 
you can see the marks from 
the outside of the can. Now, 
from the outside of the can, 
center punch and drill holes 
for the screws or pop rivets to 
be used in mounting the 



86 



magnetic latches. 

Nextj file or gut away the 
rim on one side of the can 
halfway between the two 
magnets to allow the can to 
be set down on a flat surface 
with the coax in place. 

You are ready for assem- 
bly. 

Insert the threaded end of 
the SO-239 connector into 
the can from the outside and 
pop rivet or screw it into 
place. (Aluminum pop rivets 
won't rusL If screws and nuts 
are used, get nonferrous 



types.) Then fasten the 
magnetic latches on the inside 
with screws and nuts or rivets 
from the outside> again using 
your iron straightedge for 
correct positioning. Solder 
the music wire (a small brass 
welding rod won*t rust) to 
the center lug of the SO~239 
connector. 

If music wire or other 

ferrous materia! h used^ spray 
the wire after soldering with 
clear or nonmetallic paint 

Connect your coax to the 
connector inside the can using 



a PL-259 connector. Place the 
sausage-can antenna on top of 
the car, and run the coax 
through a window or fly to 
the 2m transceiver. When the 
radio is not in the car or, 
more importantly, when the 
car is parked^ toss the anten- 
na inside. 

The sausagC"can antenna 
has been made and used by a 
number of hams in my area 
with good success. The alumi- 
num can does not rust, is 
lightweight, offers little wind 
resistancej and is easy to 



work with using the simplest 
of tools. The magnetic latches 
hold well on a variety of cars, 
from VWs bouncing across 
country to a wooded field 
day site to a full-size car at 
top highway speeds* This 
antenna has also been effec- 
tively used on a car with a 
vinyl top by mounting it on 
the trunk deck jUSt behind 
the rear window. 

For an easy one-evening 
project that will perform very 
satisfactorily^ build a sausage- 
can antenna, ■ 



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from page 85 

ison. 

In the same issue, WDOAUU 
suggests 10-Watt 10 meter 
voice privileges for Novices. To 
WD0AUU and others who may 
not be familiar vyjth mail-order 



voice privileges, I recommend 
the September, 1976, editorial 
in 73. The fact that 90% of all 
Conditionals called up for ex- 
amination could not pass the 
General test should prove the 
incentive value of mail-order 
voice privileges. As for the 



10-Watt power limit, a quick 
scan across 11 meters should 
demonstrate the FCC's ability 
to enforce power hmits, 

Robert A, Wiley WD9FQD 

Peoria \L 

The fact that 50% of ARRL 
metvbers are CBers Is no real 
surprise. The poll of 73 readers 
shows that about 10% are 
CBers. My call for hands at 
hamf&st talks also shows that 
about 10% of the active hams 
are Involved with CB. I did not 
believe the "fact" that 9£?% of 
the Conditionals called up for 
examination could not pass the 
General. I do believe that a lot 
of Conditionals , . , as well as 



most other hams . . . would 
have a difficult time passing 
the ham exams without going 
back and studying the material 
again. Much of that stuff just 
Isn't used In everyday ham- 
ming, so we all tend to forget it. 
That's human nature and not 
worth a put-down. — Wayne. 



GETTING OK 



I have been an amateur since 
1934; my WAS was issued in 
1950. Nevertheless, I like to 
contact different US stations 
on CW— especially young peo- 

Conttnu&d on pag& 90 




87 



Carl H. Crumley N4 VD 

512 North Harrisorf A venue 
CaryNC275U 



The 75m DX Chaser Antenna 

5/8 A works on 75m 
as well as 2m 



Recently, I constructed 
a 1/4-wave vertical 
wire antenna for 75 meter 
DX work. The antenna 
worked fairly welL com- 
pared to my inverted vee at 
50 feet occasionally out- 
performing it on DX and 
generally falling far short 
on close stations (as would 
be expected). 

My original 1/4-wave had 
12 ground radials 60 feet 
long under it, as well as two 
ground rods separated by 
40 feet and connected with 
a buried wire. I thought my 
ground-radial system was 
working well as a ground 



dJlTflENT 




plane for the vertical 
radiator (a 61 -foot wire 
suspended from a rope 
that hangs between two 
enormous pine trees), 

On-the-air discussions of 
my antenna with 75 meter 
DX enthusiasts brought 
several snickers about my 
poor ground. It seems that 
serious 75 meter vertical 
users believe in well over 
30 radials to lower the 
ground connection losses. 
One individual even star- 
tled me by saying that, 
even with 30 radials, I 
would have over 25 per- 
cent signal loss to the 



-tMi SftOUMU iADtALS 




ground system. 

Having already dulled 
one ax head down to a nub 
burying only 12 radials, I 
started searching for an 
easier way out to improve 
its performance. Digging 
around in old antenna 
books (the kind that talk 
about rhombics, windoms, 
and Zepps) turned up some 
interesting facts that led to 
what I have up in the trees 
now — a 5/8*wave top- 
loaded vertical. 

Theory 

The 1/2-wave dipole 



antenna carries maximum 
current at the center in- 
sulator if it is centerfed. 
The center is the minimum 
voltage point, which is why 
you can use practically 
anything 'or a center in- 
sulator. A 1/4-wave vertical 
is just half of a dipole, with 
the ground plane making 
up the missing half. Where 
current flow is highest in a 
wire antenna, maximum ra- 
diation occurs, just as the 
center of a dipole does the 
most radiating, so does the 
bottom portion of a 
1/4-wave vertical do the 



IMA. GROUND HADtALS 




Fig^ T. 



Fig. 2. 



fig. 3. 



88 



most radiating. 

All that leads to the fact 
that the bottom of my ver- 
tical was doing most of the 
work down where ground 
fosses were the highest. See 
Fig. 1. The idea, therefore, 
was to get the high current 
flowing at a point up higher 
in the wire, as in Fig. 2. That 
would make the radiating 
part of the wire further 
from ground and therefore 
reduce ground fosses. This 
is an age-old idea hams 
have been using for years 
with 160 meter antennas 
where is is practically im- 
possible to get a full-size 
vertical in the air. 

Electrically lengthening 
low-frequency vertical 
wires is usually ac- 
complished by the old 
"capacity -hat" and 
loading-coil method. Ar- 
ticles on this method tell 
you to stick the mess on 
top of a wire, and it 
becomes longer than a 1/4 
wavelength and more effi- 
cient for the previously 
mentioned reasons. But 
how long is it and does it 
really matter? 

I hated to |ust randomly 
toss up some top loading 
and hope that it was an im- 
provement. Feeling a speci- 
fic length would be prefer- 
able, I settled on 5/8-wave 
electrical length, since it 
would theoretically give 
some gain. My research 
turned up the fact that a 
5/8-wave vertical is actual- 
ly half of a "double- 
extended Zepp" (remem- 
ber that antenna?) 
operated against ground. 

Since no one can give 
you exact values for 



loading a shortened wire in 
any given situation, the 
following ideas show how I 
arrived at the values for my 
antenna. I feel confident 
that the mess in my back- 
yard is a 5/8-wave vertical. 
My method doesn't require 
any sophisticated instru- 
ments, only an swr bridge 
and a cheap grid-dip meter, 

A 1/4-wave grounded 
vertical is resonant (has a 
low impedance feedpoint). 
Therefore, a grid-dip meter 
will show a dip at the reso- 
nant frequency if the coax 
is removed and the anten- 
na temporarily attached to 
the ground system. Sure 
enough, my grid-dip meter 
said that my vertical was 
resonant at 3.8 MHz A lit- 
tle one-turn loop was 
twisted into the vertical 
wire in order to get suffi- 
cient coupling for the grid- 
dip meter. 

I lowered the wire and 
placed a ''capacity hat'' 
(see Fig. 5] on top and 
hoisted it back up. Now my 
grid-dip meter said my ver- 
tical was resonant at 2.8 
MHz. With success just 
around the corner, I then 
placed an inductance (see 
Fig, 3) between the wire 
and the capacity hat. Sud- 
denly, I could not find the 
resonant point. 1 figured it 
had gone out of the low- 
end range of the meter (1-9 
MHz). But I did find a dip 
at 5 A MHz, which turned 
out to be the 3/4-wave 
point- Multiples of 
1/4-wavelength vertical are 
resonant also, so, from this 
point on, I relied on the 
3/4-wave dip to make my 
adjustments. 




Parts List 

L 1 12 turns no, 14 solid copper wound on 2Va-Jnch form. Tapped 
4 turns from bottom for coax feedline. Space wound to allow 
moving tap for minimum swr. 

L 2 35 turns no. 14 solid copper wound on 4y2-inch form. Space 
wound over entire length, A Tupperware''"^ juice container is 
satisfactory for form. 

C 1 (if needed) 365 pF per section broadcast-type variable. AH 
sections may need to be paralleled for maximum 
capacitance if resonance is not obtained with 1 or 2 sec- 
tions. 

C 2 {\i needed) 10 pF to 250 pF wide-spaced variable. 

Ground radial s 

Each radial approximately 60 feet long, burred about 1 inch 
underground m a furrow cut with an ax. All radiats are 
brought together and soldered to a piece of copper strip. 
The radiaisdo not necessarily have to be in perfect "spokes* 
of-a-wheeJ" configuration, but may be bent to fit available 
space. 



A few more turns of wire 
added to the inductor and I 
had a good 3/4-wave reso- 
nant dip at 4,5 MHz. Now 1 
had what I was looking for. 
If the antenna was 3/4 
wavelengths long at 4.5 
MHz, then, by applying the 
usuat formulas, 1 found my 
antenna was 1/4~wave- 
length long at 1 .5 MHz and 
5/a-wavel8ngth long at 3.8 
MHz. 

Just to test my theory, I 
ungrounded the antenna 
and found a dip at 3.0 
MHz. That would be the 
1/2-wave point, and, since 
ungrounded half-waves are 
resonant (dipoles, if you 
please), I had done every- 
thing correctly up to this 
point. 

A 5/8-wave vertical be- 
ing nonresonant (not 
presenting a low-imped- 
ance feedpoint), I had to 
put a little matching coil at 
the bottom and tap up the 

WOODEN SLATS 



coil to get a suitable swr. 
My final results showed an 
swr of 1.4:1 at 3.8 MHz, 
fSee Fifi 4 1 

In so%e cases, it may be 
necessary to put a variable 
capacitor in parallel with 
the base coil and possibly 
even another in series with 
the center of the coax line. 
(See Fig. 4.) 

Results 

This was definitely the 
way to go! The antenna 
now should exhibit a little 
gain over the original 
1/4-wave vertical. More im- 
portantly, the radiating 
part of the wire (the por- 
tion with the most current 
flowing in it) is up around 
the top instead of down on 
the ground. This makes the 
ground system not as im- 
portant as when the cur- 
rent is near the bottom. 
There's no need to dig 
yourself to death burying 



NO re WIRE 




HO. 12 COP^»Eft»eL© 
FOa RSGIDITT OF 



mo. 12 COFPCn'WELO 
SOUKRED TO EACH 
INTEHtOft tlriR£. 



Fig 4. Alternate feeding methods. 



Fig. 5 Capacity hat Tacks placed on wooden cross- 
members act as points to wind wire. Connect wire to 
loading (which hangs under capacity hat) near the center. 



89 



mm 



wire all around the yard 
and offending your dog. 

Let me emphasize that ! 
still believe that the 
ground system must be 
good for any vertical to be 
a good low-angle radiator. 
The radials should be no 
shorter than 1/4 wave- 
length. No 4-foot ground 
rods or cold-water pipes 
for this antenna, please! 

An unexpected advan- 
tage is that the 5/8-wave 
isn't as prone to noise 
pickup as a 1/4-wave, since 



the 5/8-wave is physically 
grounded. The lower at- 
mospheric noise level 
makes copy a lot easier on 
weak signals. 

There's one minor disad- 
vantage - it is fairly narrow 
on frequency bandwidth. 
My usable range of fre- 
quencies is only from 375 
to 3,85 MHz. However, this 
is where all the SSB DX is 
located, so who cares? 

I have also found that 
this antenna works better 
than the old antenna when 



it comes to working nearby 
stations that are using 
antennas which transmit in 
the horizontal plane. 
Evidently, the capacity hat 
and loading coil have some 
pickup horizontally and 
help make this an all- 
around better choice than 
the 1/4-wave vertical. 

The same principles can 
be applied to make a high- 
efficiency vertical for any 
LF band. Even on 160 
meters, it would not be dif- 
ficult to get enough 



loading to make^ it a 
5/8-wave at 1.8 MHz. From 
my figures, you can see it 
didn't take much work to 
get an electrical 1/4-wave 
at 1.8 MHz while 1 was 
working my way down to a 
1/4-wave at 1 ,5 MHz (which 
is what my 5/8-wave really 
is). 

First on-the-air test on 75 
meter SSB yielded a 5 by 8 
plus 5 over S-9 report from 
G3KFT, and D16TK broke 
in to say I was 5 by 9. 

Eureka, it workslB 




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The test of an operator? Perhaps. But above all it is the thrill of 
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The Argonaut club is exclusive, not everyone is a member But If 
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from page 87 

pie who are grateful for the 
QSO. They often send a letter 
with their card, and are always 
asking for mine. Sometimes it 
is their first overseas or first OK 
contact. 



1 know most of them are 
beginners who are working 
21100-21150 kHz. Their way of 
calling CQ is usually quite 
wrong, and we lose much time 
waiting for them. It seems like 
an eternity when you hear CQ 
or CQ DX 20 times or more and 



then a cal Isign twice at the end. 
When there is QRM— and there 
always Is — we miss their call 
very easily. 

So, please, a reminder to our 
young American friends: CQ 
{three times) de W. . . (also 3 
times) or CQ (three times) DX de 
W. . . , etc., tor two minutes is 
enough— when you don't do so, 
you lose many DX contacts, 

Vlada Lausman 0K2PDD 
Brno, Czechoslovakia 



ATTENTION, ANITA! 

I would like to increase the 
membership of the newly- 



formed 40m gay CW net. We 
already have 58 members. Gay 
CW opSt please write for into. 

Don Richman AA6GA 

PO Box a&4 

Belmont GA 94002 



PLAYING GAMES 



f am writing to comment on 
Mark Herro's neat computer 
game, "The Klingons Are Com- 
ing!" (Apr,, 78). To run this pro- 
gram on the TRS'80, a few 
small modifications are 
necessary: Line 210 LET Y = 

Con tlntted on page 94 



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91 



Gary Toncre WA4FYZ 
13764 S.W. 54th. Lane 
Miami FL 33175 



The Invisible 
Allband Antenna 



works DX, too 



T 



he townhoose is fast housing in south Florida and 
becoming a new style of in California. The young ham 




Antenna in its disassembled form showing resonating sections 
for the different hands. The two sections with the traps fit 
together for operation on 80^ 40, and 15 without changing 
sections. 



living with his family or just 
out on his own may thinl< 
twice about living in a town- 
house because of the antenna 
problem, wondering how he 
can fit a decent system into a 
backyard that may only be 
18' X 35', like mine. Worse 
yet, what can you do when 
the townhouse association 
says no to any type of out- 
door antennas? In my case, 
the restriction included TV 
antennas, which have to be 
installed in the attic. TV I, 
anyone? 

When I lived in a house, 1 
used dipoles strung about 10 
feet off the roof, about 30 
feet above the ground. I 
found two characteristics of 
the dipoie to be true: 1) I 
could work only half the 
stations I heard^ and 2) t 
couldn't hear much of any- 
thing, especially DX. This 
held true for my 15 meter 
inverted vee as well as the 20 
meter dipo!e< After four years 
with dipoles, I was ready to 
try something new. 

The Antenna 

I found the answer in a 
catalog from Antenna Super- 
market (PO Box 1682, Largo 
FL). After looking through 
their catalog, I decided on the 
Model ABGl allband verticaL 



Here was an antenna with no 
traps being used on 10, 1 5, or 
20 that would stand no 
higher than 5 feet unas- 
sembled. The backyard fence 
is 6 feet high, so in unassem- 
bled form, it can't be seenl 

What good is an unas- 
sembled antenna? Well, the 
beauty of this vertical is its 
construction. It is made 
simply of pull-apart TV mast 
After the, first 5- foot section 
is mounted on the base plate, 
the sections are slipped on 
the mounted mast For 10, 
15, and 20 meters, no traps 
are used; the sections form a 
full-size vertical on each 
band. The disadvantage is the 
need to go outside to the 
antenna and switch sections 
when changing bands. This is 
only a two- minute job, with 
the result that the antenna 
can easily be taken down 
when not in use. 

The antenna's maximum 
height is 20 feet This means 
that on 80 and 40 meters^ 
traps are used to resonate the 
antenna. There is a resonating 
coii that can be adjusted by 
hand — straight out for 40 
CW or down for 40 SSB. On 
80 meters, short sections of 
mast are slipped on the top 
for any chosen segment of 
the band. Antenna Super- 
market includes enough mast 
to cut two sections for any 
two segments of 80 meters 
between 3,5 MHz and 4.0 
MHz. You can, of course, buy 
extra sections of mast and cut 
them so that you can cover 
the entire 80 meter band. The 
bandwidth on 80 is around 
100 kHzand, on40, 125 kHz 
for 2:1 swr points* Swr on 
20j IS, and 10 meters never 
rises above 1.4:T The rather 
noticeable sections that make 
the antenna resonate on 40 
and 80 meters aren't seen 
because 1 only operate those 
bands at night When the 
antenna is set for operation 
on 40 and 80 meters, it will 
also operate 15 meters with- 
out any section switching. 

The Ground 

The ground for a vertical is 
very important. In an 



92 



article in the December, 
1976, QST, author Stanley 
describes the amount of loss 
of Rdtation versus the num- 
ber of radiats.^ The Impor- 
tant point of the article is 
that a ground-mounted ver- 
tical do€sn*t require resonant 
radial s. In fact, it would be 
better to put down 50 feet of 
wire in the form of five 
10-foot radials rather than 
two 2Sfoot radials. The idea 
is to make the ground under- 
neath the vertical as con- 
ductive as possible. The 
radiation efficiency for the 
number of radials versus the 
length of radials is given in 
the article. 

Here's the shocker: I don't 
use radials at all. In my back- 
yard, planting radials would 
be difficult at best — the 
ground becomes solid coral 
rock only 6 inches down. 
Since the idea is to make the 



ground as conductive as pos- 
sible below the antenna, I 
decided to lay a piece of 
metal below the antenna* I 
went to the local hardware 
store and bought 3 square 
feet of plasterer's meta! lath 
— a tightly-woven sheet of 
metal- It isn't a solid sheet, 
but it isn't as open as chicken 
wire. Placed directly below 
the antenna, it makes a dandy 
ground. Since we were 
ripping up the grass in the 
backyard and replacing it 
with stone* it was easy to dig 
down a few inches and lay 
the sheet down and cover it 
up. 

If ripping up a 3-foot 
square piece of your back- 
yard doesn't appeal to you, 
you can use radials. Just try 
to get a good density of wire 
below the antenna. Don't lay 
them all in one direction, 
either, unless you aren*t 



^ pooT e*sc U15T srcT^oitf 







Vertical assembled for use on 20 meters, Operation before and 
after growth of the plants showed no noticeable difference In 
swr or effect! w radiation. Note that no traps are used on this 
band. 




(woumo 



3 fOOT souwi 
METAI. L4TM 



-e FOOT GROUND ROD 141 



Fig. 1. 



interested in omnidirectional 
coverage. 

Fig, 1 shows the rest of 
the installation. The mount 
for the antenna is centered 
over the buried metal and 
hammered down into the 
ground and the metal lath. 
Four 6-foot ground rods 
surround the base and are 
hammered inside the comers 
of the lath. They arc con- 
nected to the base with alu- 
minum ground wire to the 
point where the braid of the 
coax is connected. 



Some Tips and Construction 
Notes 

Before you try slipping the 
sections together, sand them 
down so that they will slip 
together easily* You will be 
happy in the middle of some 
contest that you did. 

Decide on what segments 
of 80 meters you want to 
operate. Cut the mast to the 
lengths required, as noted in 
the instructions that come 
with the antenna. Sand these 
sections where they join, too. 

I would recommend 




Top of vertical set for operation on 40 and 80 CW. 



93 



etching alt of the resonating 
sections with a diamond- 
tipped pencil or an ice pick. 
You don't want to be mea- 
suring sections and looking 
them up in the instructions in 
the middle of the contest, 
either. 

The base mast section 
mounts to the base using two 
U-bolts. This is nice when 
you want to totally dis- 
assemble the antenna. I used 
this vertical at field day last 
June, and It took just 5 
minutes to loosen the U-bolts 



and pack them with the 
masts. 

I feed the vertical with 
RG-8/U coax. 

Performance 

The general idea is that 
verticals ''radiate equally 
pooriy in ail directions.** I 
don't find this to be true. 
Unlike my dipoles, I can now 
work almost anything I hear, 
including most of the pileups 
on 20 SSB. 

Another result of using a 
vertical is the lack of QRM 



from the local boys on 10 
meters due to cross- polariza- 
tion. This amounts to a 
difference of 7 or 8 S-unils as 
measured at K4HYE, some 
to miles east of me. Believe 
me, after living in front of 
some of the guys running a 
kilowatt and a beam pointed 
at me, it's nice to be ab!e to 
hear something else on the 
band! 

Operating 80 meters can 
be tricky at times. Unless you 
used a lot of radials or a 
bigger lath, don*t expect to 



compete with those with 
full-size antennas. 

Plenty of DX is worked 
here. Europe, Africa, and 
South America are very 
strong on this antenna. Un- 
like my dipoles^ DX stations 
are usually as strong or 
stronger than stateside sta- 
tions. 

The combination of easy 
breakdown and efficiency has 
made this system work for 
me. The .system might just 
work out for you. Try it, and 
let me know the results." 



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from p&g& 90 

INT (A*RN0(1)) must be 
changed to 210 LET Y = 
iNT{A*RND(0)), The same 
change must also be applied to 
lines 220 and 230. If the pro- 
gram is run on a TRS-80 without 




W f- i ^' -% »■ 



these changes, the Khngon 
base will be located at the coor- 
dinates of your search area. 
This is not a criticism of Mark's 
program, since he addresses 
this potential problem in this 
article. 
In regard to playing games 



on computers, 1 look people 
right in the eye when they ask 
why I bought one, and admit 
that game playing was a major 
consideration* Keep up the 
good work* and keep 73 the 
best ham magazine on the 
market* 

Larry Russo K3TFU 
Columbia MD 



CHIME POWER 



i wish to add a small com- 
ment to your article on page 1 1 
of the April issue of 73 
Magazine, concerning the 
Chroma-Chime. 



I have had one of these 
"Chimes" for several months 
and iike it very much. As you 
say, it is out of the ordinary. 
There is only one thing that you 
did not know and that takes 
time to find out: The batteries 
used to power the unit only 
hold up for a couple of 
weeks— not months, as stated 
in the literature. 

The operating Instructions 
say not to operate from a power 
supply. After using up several 
sets of batteries, I replaced 
them with a power pack, after 
putting a regulator on the out- 
put of the power supply. 

Edward C. Carnes 

Deming NM 



94 




Get into 

the Easy Way with Midland 

Midland has a pair of proven performerSt ciystal controlled of 
RLX« synthesized • « . both designed to be easy on the pocketbook 



To start with, here's Midland s Mode[ 13-509. 
It's a compact, rugged mobile with capacity 
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transmits with 10- watt or 1-watt output Its re- 
ceiver has a dual gate MOS FET front end 
with hi-Q resonator and ceramic filters. There 
are SWR and polarity protection circuits, 
internal DC filtering and electronic switching. 
With its jack for optional tone burst and dis- 
criminator meter, the "509" has even been 
the basis for many repeaters, 

Midland s choice alternative in "220" is RLL 
synthesized Model 13-513. Here's advanced 
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frequency readout. It's programmed for 500 



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switching and a jack for tone burst and dis- 
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"220" mobile * * * or base. 

Pair either of Midland s "220'' mobiles with 
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HM) 






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Who Says 
Verticals Don't Work? 



the four-band phased-vertical bomber 



(end fire); 

5. inobtrusive; 

6. wind- and iccproof; 

7. instantaneous change of 
directivity with no mechani- 
cal rotation; 

8. card fold pattern end fire; 
figure-eight pattern broadside 
(see Fig- 4); 

9. always grounded for light* 
ning protection. 

There have been many 
articles of recent vintage 
which have expounded on the 
subject of vertical arrays, and, 
while they are all excellent 
reading, the arrays are cither 
expanded to the point where 
they are expensive to build, 
or ihey require more ground 
space than is generally avail- 
able to the average ham. 

One article* touches 



WUHam C, Piirdy W2LFJ 
M21 Beasant Valhy Rd. 
Syracuse NY 13215 



Numerous on-the-air and 
mail inquiries have 
prompted me to write this 
article describing my vertical 
phased-array antenna system. 
I make no claims to orig- 



inality, since the design is 
standard and encompasses 
antenna theory which has 
been around for a very [ong 
time. 

Some of the array virtues 
are herewith enumerated: 
1* relatively inexpensive to 
build; 
Z respectable forward gain; 



3, low-angle radiation; 

4. good rront-to-back ratio 



1^1^ 



hi* 




*QST, "Bfoadband, Steerable 
Phased Array/* Richard C. Fen- 
wick K5RR and R. R, 
April, 1977, p, 18, 



iM 



FEED LINES SAME LENGTH 
a,„J'^ W ' OHM f?Q ' 8 / U ^^-^ 




■/JT 





EACH LOAtJlNG coil. 
24t NG 14 A.WG on iAHGEm 
? I/E m PIAMFT^FI, 
6 TURNS/INCH 



J«IET4L StIVttCH BOX 









ttS Hifi 



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SwZ 



e 



B 



^ESULTlllG pifTECTiVJTr 



CtfiDiC'kD E\ 



»E LEFT 



£*»tBiOH' EM 



^rSHT 



6l-fi^FrtCTlO!iAL BROi&DSlOE 



96 




Photo A. 



Fig. L 



closdy on the array to be 
described. However, it uses 
two two-elemeni arrays and 
three ferrite hybrid power 
dividers and matching trans- 
formers. My antenna uses one 
two- element array, and 
matching and power dividing 
are done with coax and a 
T-connector, The general lay- 
out is shown in Fig, 1, 

The design of this array 
was based on peak perfor* 
mance on 40 meters with 
capability for operating on 
15, 20, and 80 meters, as 
wcIL The vertical height 
selected was 30 feet, which 
precluded 10 meters for low* 
angle radiation. A loading coil 
was included at the base to 
facilitate resonance and 
matching on all operable 
bands. 

The two verticals are fabri- 
cated from hard-drawn 
copper tubing beginning with 
1 inch for the bottom sec- 
tioHi 3/4 inch for the middle 
SKition, and 1/2 inch for the 
top. The top is finished with 
a l/2*inch copper end cap. 
Standard reducers are used 
between sections^ and ail sec- 
tions are sweated with solder 
and a propane torch. The 
verticals could be made from 
aluminum tubing or steel TV 
masting, but copper and 
solder were preferred for 
integrity and permanence of 
the ioints, and the cost is not 
prohibitive. The easy (but 
more expensive) way out is to 
use DenTron EX*1 verticals 
or even trap verticals. 

Referring to Photo A^ each 
vertical is strapped to two 
large standoff insulators 
which are mounted to an 
8-foot 4 X 4 sunk 2 feet into 
the ground. The bottom of 
the 4 X 4 is treated with 
creosote and stabilized with 
some rocks and half a bag of 
concrete mix. Some redwood 
stain makes the 4 x 4 above 
ground look pretty. The verti- 
cals are guyed at the second 
reducer with three nylon lines 
spaced 120 degrees on a 
circle. 

The loading coil for each 
vertical is mounted on stand- 



offs at the base, as shown in 
Photo B, and is much over* 
si zed J but, for 50^ on the 
surplus market, who would 

argue? The coils can be fabri- 
cated from B A W coil stock 
for powers to about 500 
Watts. For a kW, the wire size 
should be #1 2 AWG or larger. 

The 52*Ohm coax to each 
vertical is terminated in a 

20/4 X 1-5/8 X 2-1/8-inch 
mini box, and the center con- 
ductor is led to the loading 
coil through a feed through 
insulator and a short piece of 
1/4-inch flat copper braid ter* 
minated in an alligator clip. 
Eventually, I plan to enclose 
each loading coil in a weath- 
erproof box. While 3 feet of 
snow didn't seem to bother 
operation last winter, weath- 
erproofing can't hurt! 

Each antenna is fed with a 
length of 5 2' Ohm coax long 
enough to reach the point 
where the phase switching 
will be done. My phasing is 
done in the basement of my 
home by relays which are 
controlled from switches 
upstairs in the den, so the 
cables are each 100 feet long. 



AIHTEMMA 



^ 



k/4 



BROiOSlDf 



r 



AUt£nUik. 



£H0 



FtaE 



Ffg, 2 Bird's-eye yfew. 




Fig, X Radiat pattern. 



It is important that these 
52-Ohm cables are the same 
length, since no phase shift is 
desired at this point in the 
system. The cables are buried 
underground about 6 inches 
without protection. Be ex- 
tremely careful not to punc- 
ture the jackets. A safer way 
would be to thread each cable 



through a plastic garden hose 
before buriaL 

The 52-Ohm cable coming 
from the T-connector can be 
any convenient length to 
reach the operating position. 
Note in Fig, 1 that the 
phasing could be done with 
manual switching at the oper- 
ating position, if you don't 




Photo B, 



97 



v/ 



* I "* T' 
It 



I 4- 



* > 




mind running two coaxial 
cables and having a phasing 
line and two matching lines 
coiled up in the shack for 
each band. 

The X/4 phasing and 
nnaichtng lines are calculaled 
from the equation: 



hf4ift) = 



246 iVF I 



f {MHz) 

where VF is the velocity 
factor of the coax tine and is 
0.81 lor foam dielectric and 
0.66 for standard dielectric. 
For a frequency of 7.15 MHz 
and foam dielectric, the cal- 
culation is as follows: 



^/4 



246 (0.811 



= 77.81 ft 



The X/4 lines can be cul to 
the formula, or, for greater 
accuracy, the lines can be 
made slightly too long and 
then resonated with a dipper 
to the desired frequency. This 
is done by terminating one 
end in a male connector and 
plugging this into a female 
connector with a one-turn 
loop- Loosely couple the 
dipper to the loop and lop off 
small lengths of the cable's 
bitter end until resonance 
occurs. Then terminate the 
bitter end in another male 
connector and the job is com- 
pleted. 

The X/4 750hm lines and 
the T-connccior comprise a 
way of matching two anten- 
nas to one feed line. Since the 



T places the two lines in 
parallel, it is desirable that 
the output of each \\m 
exhibit an impedance of 104 
Ohms. The input of each lipc 
is 52 Ohms, so you must 
determine what characteristic 
impedance is needed in a X/4 
section to realize 52 Ohms at 
one end and 104 Ohms at the 
other. Calculate as follows: 



Zo =\/^T2^ = V 52- 104 = yjwm 

Iq = 73.5 Ohms. 

The above equation is 
noLhing more than the 
geometric mean of the input 
and output impedances, and 
the calculation shows that 
RG-n/U with a characteristic 
impedance of 75 Ohms is a 
first-class candidate for the 
job. 

The theoretical gain of the 
antenna with the cardioid 
end-fire pattern is about 4 d8 
and the front-to-back ratio is 
about 18 dB, The front-to- 
back ratio proved to be ex- 
tremely useful on 40 meters 
when working to the west, by 
attenuating the European 
broadcast interference about 
3 S-units. 

A high-resistance ground 
can soak up all the power 
gain, so a good ground system 
is a must. I use an 8- foot 
ground rod and 32 X/4 radials 
under each vertical soldered 
to a one- foot square copper 
plate, as shown in Photo B* 



Each plate is drilled to 
accommodate 90 radials, 
which is about optimum for a 
good ground, I install radials 
as the spirit moves me by 
soldering a X/4 copper wire 
into a piate hole and then 
burying the wire in a slit in 
the turf made with a [awn- 
edgtng tooL This gets the 
radials out of reach of the 
lawn mower and doesn't hurt 
the lawn one bit Fig. 3 shows 
the general radial pattern. 
Where two radials cross, they 
are soldered together and cut 
short at the joint When 
Photo B was taken, only 8 
radials had been installed and 
the performance was quite 
acceptable with 180 Watts 
input 

The horizontal radiation 
patterns for this array can be 
found in the Radio Engineers' 
Handbook for various spac- 
ings in wavelengths versus 
phase shift From these 
patterns, one can readily 
determine the necessary 
phase shift required for oper- 
ating the array on 20 and 80 
meters, (The array can be 
used as is on 1 5 meters.) To 
elaborate on this briefly, I 
selected a 3X/8 phasing length 
for 80 meters to give 
an end-fire cardioid pattern 
and a X/2 phasing length for 
20 meters to give a figure* 
eight pattern end fire. The 
patterns for 80 and 20 meters 



with no phasing in eillier leg 
are omnidirectional and 
figure-eight broadside, respec- 
tively. In all cases, when 
shifting bands, the X/4 match- 
ing lines must be changed 
also. 

Tune-up of the array is 
fairly simple. Resonate each 
loading coil to the approxi- 
mate operating frequency 
with a tjip meter by adjusting 
the coil tap. Then hook an 
swr meter in series with the 
coax feeding one of the verti- 
cals and tap up the coil a few 
turns from the ground end 
with the coax clip lead. 
Apply some power at the 
operating frequency through 
the swr meter and then adjust 
both coil taps for lowest swr. 
The adjustments arc inter- 
related, so some juggling is 
necessary. Repeal for the 
other vertical 

After each vertical is tuned 
up, feed the entire array and 
recheck the swr. If there has 
been a change^ make the 
adiustments that are neces* 
sary to bring the swi' in linc. 
The performance of the 
phased array is spectacular 
and is well worth the effort 
necessary to install it prop- 
erly. Photo C shows the com- 
pleted array as installed in my 
yard. I work anything I can 
hear on 40 meters, mosdy 
barefoot Reports are always 
excellent, including **loudest 
on the band" or *'only W2 
heard on the west coast 
tonight" S9 reports are com- 
mon in South Africa, New 
Zealand, Australia, Europe, 
and ail points south. If the 
QTH were not shielded on 
the north by a high ridgie 
(which generally precludes 
japan, the USSR, India, the 
Philippines, etc), I would 
have three verticals in an 
equilateral triangle configura- 
tion and, driving them two at 
a time, have a cardioid pat- 
tern in six different direc- 
tions, instantly switchable. 
Even so, the broadside bi- 
directional mode (see Fig, 2) 
performs excellently to the 
south, and I have no trouble 
working Central and South 
America and Antarctica with 
head-swelling signal reports. ■ 



9& 



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KSS-l 73-6-7 




Peterborough nh 03458 



99 



John Eaton 
J 126 H. 2nd 
Vinc^nnes IN 47591 



Low-Cost Keyboard 



II 



—software 
for the April keyboard 



This prog^am deuils the 
software for a low-cost 
keyboard (**Now Anyone Can 
Afford A Keyboard/' 73, 



April, 1978) that results in a 
powa^ful and versatile sys- 
tem. The routines are written 
comparably to TTY I/O rou- 



OO'l F ASCI I maehrne codes {vectors lo machine code tabled 

20*2 F ASCII punctuation 

30-3F ASCH numbers and punctuatiOrt 

40-6 F ASCII upper case leiters and punctuation 

60-7F ASCII lovver case Ititers and punciuation 

80 -9 F Greek and math symbols 

AO'BF Undefined 

CO-FF Graphics characters 

Table h Codeassignmerits. 



tines that fetch or output one 
letter at a time with data 
passed through the accu- 
mulator. A graphics section 
has been added which allows 
the user to construct graphics 
characters on screen by in- 
dividually turning on any or 
all of the six PolyMorphic 
graphics blocks. 

The machine codes 
(00-1 F) have been expanded 



with the addition of TAB- 
ULATION, SHIFT LOCK, 
CLEAR (home cursor), and 
ESCAPE. Altogether, 9 of the 
possible 32 codes have been 
defined. The program is 
written with all the starting 
addresses of the routines in a 
table so that you can easily 
add routines of your own, 

!f you have built the hard- 
ware shown in the article, 

then you will be able to use 
this software with a few 
changes. You wilt have to 
wire in four new switches 
(TAB, CLEAR, SHIFT 
LOCK, and GRAPHICS) in 
order to take advantage of all 
the features of the complete 
system. 

Description 

The software consists of 
two main subroutines. 
CHARIN (300A) will scan 
the keyboard for a single key* 
stroke. Once founds the code 
will be modified according to 
the SHIFT and CONTROL 
keys and the result returned 
in the accumulator. CHAROT 
(30C5) will take the code 
that is in the accumulator and 
either display it or perform 
the necessary machine func- 
tion. 

The software is designed 
to work with a PolyMorphic 



Table 2{al ASCII codes and symbols. * Undefined — default to NUL 



Key 


IC1 


IC2 


Code 


Shift 


Control 


Shift and 


W 


7 


2 


57 W 


77 w 


17 ETB* 


97 u) 














Control 


X 


8 


2 


58X 


78 X 


18 CAN 


98rv 1 


@ 





3 


40 @ 


eov 


00 NUL 


80-^ 


Y 


9 


2 


59 Y 


79 y 


19 EM* 


99V- 


A 


1 


3 


41 A 


6T3 


01 SOH' 


81 B 


Z 


A 


2 


5AZ 


7Az 


1ASUB 


9A-» 


B 


2 


3 


42 B 


62 b 


02 STX* 


82 X 


Cf 


8 


2 


58 C 


7BC 


IB ESC 


9B«- 


C 


3 


3 


43 C 


63 c 


03 ETX' 


83 2 


M 


C 


2 


5C¥ 


7C 1 


10 FS* 


9CT 1 


D 


4 


3 


44 D 


64 d 


04 EOT* 


84 e 


]} 


D 


2 


5D] 


7D} 


1DGS* 


9D-5- 


E 


5 


3 


45 E 


65 e 


05ENG* 


85 J 


T~ 


E 


2 


5E* 


7E'-' 


1E RS 


9E< ' 


F 


6 


3 


46 F 


66f 


06 ACK* 


86 -T" 


DEL 


F 


2 


5F_ 


7FB 


IF VS* 


9F^ 


G 


7 


3 


47 G 


67 g 


07 BEL* 


87 








4 


30 


20 






H 


8 


3 


48 H 


68h 


08 BS 


88 t 


1 ! 


1 


4 


31 1 


21 t 






I 


9 


3 


491 


69! 


09 HT 


89K 


2" 


2 


4 


32 2 


22* 






J 


A 


3 


4AJ 


6Aj 


OALF 


8A% 


3i^ 


3 


4 


33 3 


23 ?j 






K 


B 


3 


4B K 


BBk 


OB VT* 


8B/^- 


4$ 


4 


4 


34 4 


24 S 






L 


C 


3 


4CL 


6CI 


OC FF* 


80 V 


5% 


5 


4 


35 5 


25% 






M 


D 


3 


4DM 


6D m 


ODCR 


8D& 


6S( 


6 


4 


36 6 


26 & 






N 


E 


3 


4E N 


6E n 


OESO* 


8E0 


7' 


7 


4 


37 7 


27' 









F 


3 


4F0 


6Fo 


OFsr 


8FT 


8< 


8 


4 


38 8 


28 ( 






P 





2 


SOP 


70 p 


10 DLE' 


90P 


9) 


9 


4 


39 9 


29) 






Q 


1 


2 


51 Q 


71 q 


11 Dcr 


91 cr 


: • 


A 


4 


3A: 


2A* 






R 


2 


2 


52 R 


72 r 


12 DC2* 


92 T 


; + 


B 


4 


38; 


2B + 






S 


3 


2 


S3S 


73 s 


13 DC3* 


931/- 


.< 


C 


5 


20, 


30 < 






T 


4 


2 


54T 


74 t 


14 DC4* 


94* 


,= 


D 


5 


2D- 


3D = 






U 


5 


2 


55 U 


75 u 


15NAK* 


95 X 


.> 


E 


5 


2E. 


3E> 






V 


6 


2 


56 V 


76 V 


16SYM* 


96 9 


/? 


F 


5 


2F/ 


3F? 







a 



^m 



Video display board, l^is is a 
64 X 16 display which 
occupies 1024 bytes of 
memory (7C0O-7FFF). 

Both routines use a 
pointer in memory lo keep 
track of the position of the 
cursor on the screen. VIDLIN 
(00 ED) contains the low* 
order byte of the cursor 
address, whiie 
VIDLIN&KOOEE) contains 
the high -order byte. This 
pointer should be set to 7C00 
when the system is loaded. 
The routines will take care of 
updating it* 

Operation 

Both routines use the 
accumulator to pass data 
back and forth to the calling 
rootine. An 8-bit accumulator 
can have up to 256 possible 
codes, but only 224 are used 
by these routines. Tabic 1 
shows how the codes are 
assigned to the different 
characters. A complete break- 
down of all the codes and 
their displayed symbols is 
given in Tables 2(a), 2(b), and 
2(c). The symbols are depen- 
dent on the type of character 
generator that your video 
board uses, but they will 
generally be the same as those 

shown. 

If a machine code (00-1 F) 
is given to the CHAROT 
routine, it will vector to a 
machine language routine 
that will perfonn the needed 
function. Routines are pro- 
vided for NUL, BACK' 
SPACE, TABULATION, 
LINEFEED, CARRIAGE 
RETURN, CLEAR, SHIFT 
LOCK, ESCAPE, and 
SCROLL All other machine 



codes are set to vector to 
NUL if they are called. If you 

want to define any additional 
machine codes (or redefine 
any of the current ones), all 
that you have to do is write a 
machine language routine to 
perform the needed function 
and place its starting address 
In the machine code vector 
table (see Table 3). 

PolyMorphic video 
graphics characters can be 
created on the screen* With 
graphics, the entire character 
block is divided into six large 
squares. When the 
GRAPHICS key is pressed, all 
six squares will light up at the 
cursor position. Then pressing 
any of the keys from 1 
through 6 will turn off the 
corresponding square. Any or 
all of the squares may be 
turned off. If a mistake is 
made, then pressing any other 
key on the keyboard will 
relight the entire block. Re- 
leasing the GRAPHICS key 
will move the cursor to the 
next position. 

The REPEAT key can be 
used by itself to move the 
cursor to the right without 
changing any of the displayed 
video. When used with any 
other key, it will con- 
tinuously input that key over 
and over. 

Several machine language 
routines arc used to perform 
various functions. BACK- 
SPACE will move the cursor 
to the left one position. It 
can be used with or without 
the REPEAT key. 

When a CARRIAGE 
RETURN is pressed, it will 
cause the video from the 
cursor to the right margin to 



be blanked out The cursor 
will be reset to the start of 
the next line. If that is off the 
screen, then the display will 
be scrolled and the cursor set 
ID the bottom line. 

A LINEFEED will move 
the cursor down one line 
from its current position but 
not move it horizontally. If it 
goes off the bottom of the 
screen, it will wrap around to 
the top line. 

Pressing the SHIFT-LOCK 
key will set the shift-lock 
memory bit to 1 . This has the 
same effect as holding down 
the SHIFT key as you type. 
It can be reset by depressing 
the SHIFT key by itself. 

The ESCAPE key causes 
the program to jump to the 
address that is stored at 
17FC. You will normally load 
the address of your monitor 
program in there. The return 
address of the routine that 
called the CHAROT routine 
is pulled from the stack so 
that repeated use of the 
ESCAPE function will not fill 
up the stack. 

The CLEAR key causes 
the cursor to home to the top 
left corner. It will also set the 
first 64 bytes of page zero 
memory to 00. This is for 
routines that need to handle 
an entire line at one time. For 
more on this, see Appendix 1. 

A SCROLL function is 
called whenever the screen 
has been filled. The routines 
automatically scroll the 
screen when the last position 
has been filled. If you want 
to manually scroll it, you can 
do it with an "up arrow" and 
CONTROL . 

A TABULATION function 



Key 


ICl 


ICS 


Code 


SPACE 





5 


20 


BACKSPACE 


8 


7 


08 



TAB 



D9 



UNEFEED 
CAR RET 

CLEAR 

SHIFT LOCK 

ESCAPE 



D 



8 

A 
6 



6 

6 
6 



OA 



OO 



18 

TA 
IB 



Reisults 

Places a blank on the screen. 

Backspaces cursor one position 

to the left. 

Moves cursor to the next position 

with a tab set on, TAB with SHIFT 

will set a tab; TAB with CONTROL 

will clear a tab. 

Moves cursor dovvn orie fine, wraps 

around to top of screen* 

Blanks Tme from cursor to right 

margin. Resets cursor to start 

of next line. Scrolls if on the last line. 

Clears the tine register and homes 

ttte cursor. 

Sets shift-tock mode to on. 

Transfers control to (17FC), 



i 


3 




9 


£ 




4 


1 





Fig, U Graphics b/ock. 



Tahk 2{b). Machine codes and resutts. 



Code 


Pressed 


CO 


None 


CI 


1 


C2 


2 


C3 


1.2 


C4 


3 


C5 


1,3 


C6 


2,3 


C7 


1,2,3 


C8 


4 


C9 


1,4 


CA 


2.4 


CB 


1.2,4 


CC 


3,4 


CD 


1.3,4 


CE 


2, 3. 4 


CF 


1,2,3,4 


DO 


6 


Dl 


1,5 


D2 


2,5 


D3 


1*2,5 


D4 


3,5 


D5 


1,3,5 


D6 


2. 3. 5 


D7 


1,2:3,5 


D8 


4,5 


D9 


1,4,5 


DA 


2,4,5 


DO 


1/2,4,5 


DC 


3,4,5 


OD 


1.3,4,5 


OE 


2,3,4,5 


DF 


1,2,3,4,5 


EG 


a 


El 


1.6 


E2 


2,6 


E3 


1,2,6 


E4 


3.6 


E5 


1.3.6 


E6 


2, 3, 6 


E7 


1.2.3.6 


E8 


4,6 


E9 


1,4,6 


EA 


2, 4, 6 


EB 


1,2,4,6 


EC 


3,4,6 


ED 


1,3,4,6 


EE 


2.3.4,6 


EF 


1,2,3.4,6 


FO 


5.6 


Ft 


1,5,6 


F2 


2,5,6 


F3 


1.2,5,6 


F4 


3,5,6 


F5 


1,3,5,6 


F6 


2,3,5,6 


F7 


1.2,3,5,6 


FB 


4, 5, 6 


F9 


1.4,5,6 


FA 


2,4,5,6 


FB 


1,2,4,5,6 


FC 


3,4/5,6 


FD 


1,3,4.5,6 


FE 


2,3,4,5,6 


FF 


1,2,3.4,5.6 


Table 2fcl 


Graphics char- 


acters and codes. 




101 Us 



Addr^9 


Dtta 


Mdchint Code 


CaLled by 


0300 


01 31 


00 NUL* 




0302 


01 31 


01 SOH 




0304 


01 31 


02STX 




0306 


01 31 


03 ETX 




0308 


01 31 


04 EOT 




030 A 


01 31 


05 ENG 




030C 


01 31 


06 ACK 




030 E 


01 31 


07 BEL 




0310 


02 31 


03 BS 


BACKSPACE 


0312 


7B31 


09 HT 


TAB 


0314 


22 31 


OA LF 


LINEFEED 


0316 


01 31 


OB VT 




0318 


01 31 


OC FF 




031 A 


16 31 


ODCR 


CARRIAGE RE 


031 C 


01 31 


OESO 




031 E 


01 31 


OF Si 




0320 


01 31 


10 OLE 




0322 


Ot 31 


11 DC1 




0324 


01 31 


1 2 DC2 




0326 


01 31 


13DC3 




0328 


01 31 


14DC4 




032 A 


01 31 


1 5 HAK 




032C 


Ot 31 


16SYN 




032 E 


01 31 


1 7 ETB 




0330 


42 31 


1 S CAN 


CLEAR 


0332 


01 31 


10 EM 




0334 


34 31 


1 A SUB 


SHIFT LOCK 


0336 


30 31 


IB ESC 


ESCAPE 


0338 


01 31 


1CFS 




033 A 


01 31 


1DGS 




033C 


54 31 


IE RS 


t& CONTROL 


033E 


01 31 


IF VS 





Table 3. Machine cade vector table. *All undefined codes 
defautl to NUL 



has been programmed into 
this software. Each of the 64 
characters on a line has a 
unique tab bit that can be set 
or cleared. When the TAB 
key has been pressedi the 
cursor will move to the right 
and will not stop until it 
reaches a position with the 
tab bit set or the right 
margin. To set the tab, you 
must position the cursor to 
the desired column and press 



TAB and SHIFT. To dear a 
tab, use TAB and CONTROL 
Don't tab the column on the 
left margin because that tab 
bit is also used as a shift-lock 
bit 

Memory Requirements 

The software itself can be 
placed in either ROM or 
RAM and only requires 512 
bytes. The video display 
board should be comparable 





at 

10 






















1 


\'m f 


' i 


T4l4ft 


' 1 E ^ 




ft* 






























^AS 


c 
i 

4 





1 






P42 


















^^ 


P*| 




















p^ . 




















t-rm 






































^^' 




















■_^ 




















' 






































^^ 




















^^ 




















1 








































^^ 










. . 1 








~ 






i ^ 










^"^' 








1 


1 













PBZ ■ 
PBl ' 



SEPEAT 



Jff 



Fig^ Z Hardware requirements for the keyboard port 
\m 102 



to a PolyMorphic board in 
order to use all of the fea^ 
tures of the software. It 
should reside in memory at 
7CQa7FFF. 

The software uses 7 bytes 
of page zero memory. Five 
bytes, from 0080 through 
0084, arc only used while the 
routines are executing and 
may be used by other pro- 
grams as required. Only 2 
bytes of memory must be 
uniquely assigned to the 
video I/O system. These are 
OOED and OOEE. They con- 
tain the address of the cursor 
position. During system 
power up, you must set these 
to 00, 7C, The program will 
update and change them as 
required. 

The first 64 bytes of page 
03 contain the machine code 
vector table- This should be 
RAM in order to allow you to 
modify and expand the 
machine codes. 

Eight bytes, from 0340 
through 0347, contain the 
tabulation table. Tine 54 
single bits in this table 
contain the tab status for the 
64-character line. A 1 is a set 
tab, and a is a cleared tab* 
The tab bit for the left 
margin row also serves as a 
shift-lock memory, 

CHARIN Routine: Theory of 
Operation 

When the CHARIN 
routine is called, it will 
initialize the Y-index and the 
data direction register for the 
keyboard port* The character 
that is currently on the screen 
where the cursor is to go is 
read and stored in memory. A 
cursor (FF) is then displayed 
on the screen- 

The program then starts its 
main scanning loop at 
LOPIOL Y is set to sixteen, 
and the prop'am increments 
the keyboard port sixteen 
times. Each lime, bit #7 is 
tested to see if a key is 
pressed. If one is, then the 
program will branch to 
PROCES, 

If no key is pressed, the 
port with the SHIFT, CON* 
TROL, REPEAT, and 
GRAPHICS keys is tested. 

When a SHIFT key is 



pressed by itself, the program 
will clear the shift-lock bit to 
0. It does this by ANDing the 
shift-lock memory byte with 
7F and storing it back into 
memory. 

At location CONI01, the 
program will test the RE- 
PEAT key, When it is pressed, 
the program will branch up to 
SKIP. The cursor is turned 
off, and the video pointer is 
moved to the next position. 
Tlie cursor is then turned 
back on again. The use of the 
DELAY subroutine at 3007 
and 3019 will assure that the 
cursor will move slowly 
enough across the screen. 

If the REPEAT key was 
not pressed, the program 
would have tested the 
GRAPHICS key and 
branched back to the main 
scanning loop if it was not 
pressed. 

When the GRAPHICS key 
is pressed, the program will 
store a 00 on the screen, 
which lights up the entire 
character block. The program 
then goes into a loop that 
tests both the GRAPHICS 
key and scans the keyboard 
for a pressed key. tf the 
GRAPHICS key is released, 
the character that is currently 
on the screen will be sent to 
the calling program. If any 
keyboard key is prcssedj it 
will be tested to make sure 
that it is between 1 and 6. If 
any illegal key is pressed, the 
program branches back to the 
start of the graphics section 
and starts over. 

When a key from 1 
through 6 is pressed, the key 
is masked with an 07 to clear 
the five highest bits. The re* 
suit is then placed in Y. The 
accumulator is cleared, and a 
single 1 in the carry flag is 
shifted into the accumulator 
Y number of times. This posi- 
tions a single 1 bit in the 
accumulator, according to the 
number of the key that was 
pressed. The result is com- 
bined with the character 
already on the screen and 
then is displayed. This 
process is repeated until the 
GRAPHICS key is released. 

When the main scanning 
loop has detected that a 



Program A. Main listings. 

ASCII key has been pressed, 
it wilt branch to PROCES 
(3074). Here it jumps directly 
to a short delay subroutine. 
This gives around 700 micro- 
seconds delay and resets Y to 
00. The delay, along with the 
nature of the scan routinBp 
will ensure that, when the 
code Is read from the port, it 
will not be during a switch 
bounce. 

The cursor is turned off, 
and the normal code is read 
from the keyboard port and 
saved in memory, The pro- 
gram then goes into a wait 
loop. The program will exit 
the loop only when: (1) the 
ASCII key is released, (2) the 
REPEAT key is pressed, and 
(3) another key on the same 
matrix row as the original 
key, but with a higher 
priority connection to IC2, is 
pressed. That third condition 
ensures that, when you press 
a second key without 
releasing the first one, both 
of them will be correctly 
read. 

Once the program is out of 
the wait loop, it will test the 
code that it has received. If 
the code is a machine code or 
a SPACE, then the program 
will terminate and give that 
code to the calling routine. 

For aEI other codes, the 
CONTROL key is then 
tested. If pressed, it will AND 
the code with 3F. That strips 
away the two high-order bits. 

The SHIFT key and shift- 
lock bit are then tested. If 
neither is on, then the pro- 
gram will terminate and pass 
the code to the calling 
routine. 

If the code is to be shifted, 
it is tested to determine what 
needs to be done. Codes that 
are greater than or equal to 
40 need only to be ORed 
with 20 to perform the shift. 
These are all the letter keys. 
Codes that are less than 20 
can only be made by Greek 
and math symbols, so they 
must be ORed with 80. Any 
other code must be between 
20 and 40, and these require 
that their fifth bit is inverted 
This is done with an 



0000 








LB 




Line register 64 bytes 


oom 








TEMP 




Temp storage 4 bytes 


0084 








CURSOR 




Cursor storage 


OOED 








VIDLIN 




Cur$of address 


0300 








MACTAB 




Vector table 64 bytes 


0340 








TABTAB 




Tab table 8 bytes 


1700 








PORTS 




Keyboard ports 

1 


3000 


A5 


84 




SKIP 


LDA CURSOR 


1 
Repeat section 


3002 


91 


ED 






STA (VIDLIN),Y 


Cursor off 


3004 


20 


E7 


30 




JSR NEXCHA 




3007 


20 


04 


31 




JSR DELAY 




300A 


AO 


00 




CHARIN 


LDY-00 


Start of routine 


300C 


A9 


OF 






LDA-DF 




300E 


SD 


01 


17 




STAPORTSSfl 


DDR 


301 T 


B1 


ED 






LDA fVIDLIN).Y 


1 


3013 


85 


84 






STACURSOf^ 


1 


3015 


A9 


FF 






LDA^^F 


1 


30 T 7 


91 


ED 






STA (VIDLINI^Y 


Cursor on 


3019 


20 


04 


31 




JSR DELAY 


i 


301 C 


AO 


10 




LOPI01 


LDY#10 


Main loop 


301 E 


EE 


00 


17 


SCAN 


J NC PORTS 


1 


3021 


2C 


00 


17 




BIT PORTS 


Test for key 


3024 


10 


4E 






BPL PROCES 


Key pressed 


3026 


88 








DEY 




3027 


DO 


FS 






BNE SCAN 


Test 16 limes 


3029 


AD 


02 


17 




LDA P0RTS&2 


Test other port 


302C 


4A 








LSR A 




302D 


BO 


DA 






BCSCONI01 


SHIFT not pressed 


302F 


48 








PHA 




3030 


A9 


7F 






LDA#7F 




3032 


2D 


40 


03 




AND TABTAB 




3035 


80 


40 


03 




STA TABTAB 


Clear shift lock 


3038 


68 








PLA 




3039 


4A 






CON 101 


LSR A 




303A 


4A 








LSR A 




303B 


90 


C3 






BCCSKrP 


Repeat key pressed 


303D 


4 A 








LSR A 




303 E 


BO 


DC 






BCSLOPlOl 


GR AP H ICS not pressed 


3040 


AB 


00 




GRAPH 


LDA^O 




3042 


91 


ED 






STA (VIDLINlY 


Turn on block 


3044 


EE 


00 


17 


LOP 102 


INC PORTS 


Search for key 


3047 


AD 


02 


17 




LDAPORTS&2 




304A 


29 


08 






AND#0S 


Mask off GRAPHICS 


304C 


DO 


21 






BNECONm2 


GRAPHICS released 


304E 


AD 


00 


17 




LDA PORTS 




3051 


30 


F1 






BMI LOPI02 


ASCII not pressed 


3053 


C9 


31 






CIVIP#31 




3055 


90 


E9 






BCC GRAPH 


Key less than 1 


3057 


C9 


37 






cyp#37 




3059 


BO 


E5 






BCS GRAPH 


Key gtr than 6 


305B 


29 


07 






AND^^7 




305D 


A8 








TAY 




305E 


A9 


00 






LDA #00 




3060 


38 








SEC 




3061 


2A 






LOP 103 


ROL A 


Shift bit y utnes 


3062 


88 








DEY 




3063 


DO 


FC 






BNE LOPI03 




3065 


11 


ED 






ORA tVlDUN),Y 


Combine with screen 


3067 


91 


ED 






STA iVIDLIN),Y 


Display 


3069 


20 


04 


31 




JSR DELAY 




306C 


38 








SEC 




306D 


BO 


D5 






BCS LOP102 


Rpiatrue jump 


306F 


A9 


CO 




CON 102 


LDA#C0 


Convert to graphics 


3071 


11 


ED 






ORA (VIDLIN),Y 


code and return 


3073 


60 








RTS 




3074 


20 


%2 


31 


PROCES 


JSR DEL 


Key bounce delay 


3077 


AS 


84 






LDA CURSOR 




3079 


91 


ED 






STA iVIDLINi.Y 


Cursor off 


307B 


AD 


00 


17 




LDA PORTS 


Fetch ASCII code 


307 E 


85 


80 






STA TEMP 




3080 


AD 


02 


17 


LOP 104 


LDA P0RTSSt2 




3083 


29 


04 






ANO#04 




3085 


FO 


09 






BEQCONI03 


REPEAT pressed 


3087 


AD 


00 


17 




LDA PORTS 




308A 


30 


04 






BMI CONt03 


ASCII released 


3C^C 


C5 


80 






CMP TEMP 




308E 


FO 


FO 






BEQ LOPI04 


Same key pressed 


3090 


A5 


80 




CON103 


LDA TEMP 


Fetch normal code 


3m2 


C9 


21 






CMP^I 





103 



22 



3094 


90 


19 


3096 


AD 


02 


3099 


29 


03 


309B 


C9 


02 


309 D 


BO 


08 


309 F 


48 




30A0 


A9 


3F 


30A2 


25 


80 


30A4 


85 


8D 


30A6 


68 




30A7 


4A 




30A8 


90 


08 


30AA 


2C 


40 


30AD 


30 


03 


30AF 


A5 


80 


30B1 


60 




3062 


A5 


80 


30B4 


C9 


40 


3066 


90 


03 


30B8 


09 


20 


30BA 


60 




30BB 


C9 


20 


30BD 


BO 


03 


30BF 


09 


80 


30C1 


60 




30C2 


49 


10 


30C4 


60 




30C5 


AO 


00 


30C7 


48 




30C8 


C9 


20 


3DCA 


BO 


10 


30CC 


OA 




30CD 


85 


81 


30CF 


A9 


6C 


30DT 


85 


80 


30D3 


A9 


03 


30D5 


85 


82 


30D7 


20 


80 


30DA 


68 




30DB 


60 




30DC 


C9 


CO 


30DE 


BO 


02 


3DE0 


29 


7F 


30E2 


49 


80 


30E4 


91 


ED 


30E6 


6B 




30E7 


48 




30E8 


E6 


ED 


30EA 


DO 


OF 


30EC 


E6 


EE 


30EE 


10 


06 


30F0 


20 


54 


30F3 


A9 


CO 


30F5 


85 


ED 


30F7 


A9 


7F 


30F9 


86 


EE 


SGFB 


A9 


3F 


30FD 


25 


ED 


30FF 


AA 




3100 


68 




3101 


60 




3102 


C6 


ED 


3104 


48 




310S 


Ag 


55 


3107 


85 


81 


3109 


20 


12 


3 IOC 


C6 


81 


310E 


DO 


F9 


3110 


68 




3111 


60 




3112 


C8 




3113 


DO 


FD 


3115 


60 




3116 


A9 


3F 


3118 


91 


ED 


311A 


20 


E7 


311D 


25 


ED 


311F 


DO 


F5 


3121 


60 




3122 


18 




3123 


A5 


ED 



17 



CON 104 



03 



CONI05 
SHIFT 



LO 



MED 
CHAROT 



00 



CON 106 



CON 107 



NEXCHA 



31 



0UTI01 



31 



BACSPC 
DELAY 



LOP 105 



DEL 



CART 



30 



UNFD 



BCC C0Nm5 

LDA PORTS8e2 

AND#03 

CMP#02 

8CS CONI04 

PHA 

LDA#3F 

AND TEMP 

STA TEMP 

PLA 

LSR A 

BCC SHIFT 

BJTTABTAB 

BM( SHIFT 

LDA TEMP 

RTS 

LDA TEMP 

CMP #40 

BCCLO 

ORA^O 

RTS 

CMP#20 

BCS MED 

ORA^O 

RTS 

EOR#1 

RTS 



Machine code 



PHA 

CMP#20 

BCS CONI06 

ASLA 

STA TEMP&l 

LDA^C 

STA TEMP 

LDA#03 

STA TEMP&2 

JSR TEMP 

PLA 

RTS 

CMP#C0 

BCS CON 1 07 

AND#7F 

EOR#S0 

STA {VIDLIN),Y 

PLA 

PHA 

INC VIDLIN 

BNE OUTrOl 

INC VIDLIN&1 

B PL OUT! 01 

JSR SCROLL 

LDA#CO 

STA VIDLIN 

LDA#7F 

STA VIDLINail 
LDA#3F 

AND VIDLIN 

TAX 

PLA 

RTS 

DEC VIDLIN 

PHA 

LDA #55 

STA TEMP&l 

JSR DEL 

OECTEMF&1 

BNE LOPi05 

PLA 

RTS 

INY 

BNE DEL 

RTS 
LDA=3F 

STA (VIDLIN|,Y 

JSR NEXCHA 

AND VIDLIN 

BNE CART 

RTS 

CLC 

LDA VIDLIN 



CONTROL not pressed 



SHIFT pressed 

Shift lock sat 
Fetch code 



Code less than 40 



Code f f om 20 to 3F 
GrBekand math 

I nvert Sth bit 

Single char output 



Not a machine code 



Indirect jump to table 
Restore code 



Graphics 
Clear high bit 
Invert high bit 
Display 

Increment VIDLIN 



Result on screen 



Backspace routine 
Delay routine 



Car ret routine 
Display a blank 



Line not finished 



Linefeed routine 



M 



EOR#10. 

The CHARIN routine has 
now finished, and the 
accumulator can contain any 
one of the 224 possible codes 
that can be produced at the 
keyboard, 

CHAROT Routine: Theory 
of Operation 

Now that you have re- 
ceived a code from the key* 
board, you want to display it 
on the screen. The CHAROT 
routine does this. The routine 
first tests the code to see if it 
is less than 20. If it is, the 
code must be a machine code. 

When a machine code is 
found, it is doubled with an 
ASL A command and stored 
in memory. The memory 
byte before it is filled with a 
6Q which is the op code for 
an indirect jump. The byte 
after it is filled with 03, 
which is the page number of 
the machine code table. 
Then, by jumping to the 
address with the 6C op code, 
the program makes an in- 
direct jump into the machine 
code table. Whatever address 
is stored in that position of 
the table takes control of the 
processor. 

If the code was not a 
machine code, it is tested 
again at CON 106. A non^ 
graphics character will be 
masked with 7F to clear the 
high-order bit. The high-order 
bit for all characters is in- 
verted to conform with the 
PolyMorphic video board. 
The character is displayed by 
storing it in ihe video 
memory. 

The pointer at VIDLIN is 
incremented to the next posi- 
tion. If the resulting address 
is 8000, the screen is scrolled, 
and the pointer Is reset to 
7FC0. The value of the X- 
index is set from 00 to 3F. 
depending on the new cursor 
position. For more on this, 
see Appendix T 

Machine Codes: Theory of 
Operation 

The nine machine codes in 
the software were designed to 
make using the system easier 
and to simulate the action of 
a normal TTY machine. A 



104 



vector table containing the 
starting addresses of all the 
routines was chosen to allow 
for flexibility and expansion. 
The routines work as follows: 

NUL: The simplest routine 
is merely a jump to an RTS 
statement, It» in effect, does 
nothing. All undefined codes 
in the machine table default 
to a NUL 

BACKSPACE: This 
routine decrements the value 
in the low-order byte of the 
cursor address (OOEDJ. tl 
then delays for a moment in 
order to siow down the 
cursor movement when used 
with the REPEAT key. 
Because the high-order byte 
of the address is never 
changed, it will not backspace 
across the left margin when 
the cursor is on lines 1, S, 9, 
and 13. 

CARRIAGE RETURN: 
This routine takes a Poly- 
Morphic blank (3F) and 
stores it on the screen at the 
cursor. It then increments the 
cursor to the next position 
and ANDs the low-order byte 
of the new cursor position 
with 3F, If the result is not 
00, then the cursor is not yet 
to a new line. The program 
repeats until the cursor is at 
the start of the next line. 
Scrolling occurs when the 
cursor is incremented into 
address 8000. 

LINEFEED: This routine 
works by adding 40 to the 
cursor address. If the result is 
greater than 7FFFi the high- 
order byte is set to 7C. The 
decimal flag in the 6500 must 
be cleared in order to use this 
routine. 

SHIFT LOCK: This 
routine merely sets the 
highest bit at address 0340 
and does not affect any 
others. This bit would 
normally be the tab status bit 
for the left-hand margin of 
the screen. Since there is no 
need to tab to a margin (a 
CARRIAGE RETURN does 
the same thing), it is used as a 
shift' lock indicator. 

ESCAPE. This routine 
pulls the normal return 
address of the program off 
the stack and jumps to the 
address stored at 17FC and 



3125 


69 


40 




ADC#40 


3127 


85 


ED 




STA VIDLIIS] 


3129 


A9 


00 




LDA#O0 


3t2B 


65 


EE 




ADC VlDLINStl 


31 2D 


10 


02 




BPLOUTI02 


312F 


A9 


7C 




LDA#7C 


3131 


85 


EE 


OUTI02 


STA VrDLIM&l 


3133 


60 






RTS 


3134 


AD 


40 03 


SHI FT L 


LDA TABTAB 


3137 


09 


80 




ORA^O 


3139 


8D 


40 03 




STA TABTAB 


313C 


60 






RTS 


3130 


68 




ESCAPE 


PLA 


313E 


68 






PLA 


313F 


6C 


FC 17 




JMP(17FCJ 


3142 


A9 


7C 


CLEAR 


LDA#7C 


3144 


85 


EE 




STA V1DLIN&1 


3146 


A9 


00 




LDA#00 


3148 


85 


ED 


- 


STA VIOLIN 


31 4A 


AO 


3F 




LDY#3F 


314C 


99 


00 00 


LOP 106 


STA LR.Y 


314F 


88 






DEY 


3150 


10 


FA 




BPL LOPI06 


3152 


C8 






INY 


3153 


60 






RTS 


3154 


84 


80 


SCROLL 


STY TEMP 


3156 


A9 


40 




LDA #40 


3158 


85 


82 




STA TEMPflt? 


31 5A 


A9 


7C 




LDA#7C 


31 5C 


8B 


81 




STATEMPSil 


315E 


85 


83 




STA TEMP&3 


3160 


B1 


82 


LOP 107 


LDA (TEMP&2J,V 


3162 


91 


30 




STA (TEMPJ.V 


3164 


E6 


80 




INC TEMP 


3166 


DO 


02 




8NECONI08 


3168 


E6 


81 




tNC TEMP 8(1 


316A 


E6 


82 


CON 108 


INCTEMP&2 


316C 


DO 


F2 




BNE LOP 107 


316E 


E6 


83 




INCTeMP8c3 


3170 


10 


EE 




BPL LOPI07 


3172 


A9 


3F 




LDA#3F 


3174 


91 


80 


LOP 108 


STA(TEWIPJ,Y 


3176 


E6 


80 




INC TEMP 


3178 


DO 


FA 




BNE LOPIOS 


31 7A 


60 






RTS 


317B 


AD 


02 17 


TAB 


LDA P0RTS&2 


317E 


29 


03 




AND#03 


3180 


C9 


03 




CMP#03 


3182 


DO 


12 




BNE SHOT 


3184 


20 


E7 30 


TABIT 


JSR NEXCHA 


3187 


20 


A2 31 




JSR SETUP 


31 8A 


BO 


12 




BCS UNSET 


318C 


20 


9E 31 




JSR UNSET 


318F 


A9 


3F 




LDA#3F 


3191 


C5 


80 




CMP TEMP 


3193 


DO 


EF 




BNE TABIT 


3195 


60 






RTS 


3196 


20 


A2 31 


SHOT 


JSR SETUP 


3199 


AD 


02 1 7 




LDA PORTS&2 


319C 


4A 






LSR A 


3190 


4A 






LSR A 


319E 


A4 


81 


UNSET 


LDY TEMP&1 


31A0 


10 


10 




BPL LOPI09 


31A2 


A9 


3F 


SETUP 


LDA;f3F 


31A4 


25 


ED 




ANDVrDLIN 


31A6 


85 


80 




STA TEMP 


3 IAS 


86 


82 




STX TEMP&2 


31AA 


AS 






TAY 


31AB 


A9 


3F 




LDAii3F 


3tAD 


38 






SEC 


31AE 


E5 


80 




SBC TEMP 


31B0 


85 


81 




STA TEMP&l 


31B2 


A2 


07 


LOP109 


LDX#07 


31B4 


3E 


40 03 


L0PI10 


ROLTABTAB,X 


31B7 


CA 






DEX 


31B8 


10 


FA 




BPL LO P1 10 


31BA 


88 






DEY 


31 B8 


10 


F5 




BPL L0P109 


3tBD 


A6 


82 




LDX TEMP&2 


31 BF 


C8 






INY 


3 ICO 


60 






RTS 



Result on screen 



Shift lock routine 



Escape routine 



Clear line register 
and borne cursor 



Scroll routine 



Still on screen 



Blank out last line 



Tab routine 

Test for S or C 
Shift or control 



Tab found 



Not end of line 



Unconditional jump 



Shift tabtab Y times 



105 



J^ 



17FD. This should be set to 
the starting address of your 
system monitor and acts as an 
easy way to stop the program 
when it asks for data. Since 
this system is not an interrupt 
driven system, it is handy to 
also connect a RESET line to 
a spare key switch to handle 
any continuous loops in your 
program. 

CLEAR: This routine sets 
the VIDLIN pointer to 7C0O 
(upper left corner) and sets 
the first 64 bytes in page zero 
to 00- Appendix 1 gives more 
details concerning the use of 
the page zero niemory. 

SCROLL: The SCROLL 
routine acts to move alt the 
data on the screen up one 
line. It does this by setting up 
two pointers in page zero 
memory. The first pointer 
points to 7C00, and the 
second one points to 7C40. 
The 64-byte difference is the 
length of one line. Dala is 
read from the second pointer 
and stored at the first. Both 
are then incremented by one, 
M/hen the second pointer has 
reached 8000, the lower 15 
lines have been moved to the 
upper T5 lines. A Poly- 
Morphic blank (3F) is then 
used to fill up the bottom 
line. 

TABULATION: This 
routine actually does three 
separate things. It sets a tab 
when TAB is pressed along 
with a SHIFT key. It clears a 
tab when TAB is pressed 
along with the CONTROL 
key. When TAB is pressed by 
itself, it moves the cursor to 
the right and stops it at the 
first column with a set tab. If 



none are set^ it will stop at 
the right margin. 

The program maintains a 
table for the tab status at 
0340, The 64 columns re- 
quire 8 bytes of RAM, These 
8 memory bytes and carry 
flag are turned into a 65 x 1 
recirculating shift register by 
the SETUP routine in the 
TAB program. When SETUP 
is called, it figures out which 
one of the 64 columns it is 
looking for by ANDing 3F 
with the cursor position. It 
then uses two loops and a 
ROL instruction to shift at I 
64 bits of memory and the 
carry flag until the tab bit it 
needs has been shifted into 
the carry flag. While in the 
flag, it can easily be set, 
cleared, or tested- The 
SETUP routine also computes 
the number of times that it 
will have to continue to shift 
the memory in order to re- 
store it to its original posi- 
tion. The routine UNSET 
lakes this number and uses it 
to restore the table. 

When the TAB routine is 
entered, it first tests the 
SHIFT and CONTROL keys 
to see if they are pressed. If 
they are, it shifts the table 
until the tab bit for the 
current position is in the 
carry flag. It then sets or 
clears the flag, depending on 
the key pressed, and restores 
the table. The only bit 
affected is the tab bit for the 
current position. 

If neither the SHIFT nor 
CONTROL key is pressed, 
the cursor is moved one 
position. The cursor is incre^ 
mented by subroutine 



NEXCHA, and the table is 
then shifted until the tab bit 
for that column is in the 
carry flag. A set carry flag 
will cause the program to 
branch lo the UNSET 
routine, where the table is 
restored. The routine is 
terminated with the cursor 
left on a set tab position. 



If the carry flag was not 
set, the program would Still 
use the UNSET routine to 
restore the table. But then it 
would test the column, and, 
if it was not at the right 
margin, it would go back and 
start again. Eventually, it 
would find either a set tab or 
the margin. ■ 



APPENDIX 1 
Using the Routines 

The single character 1/0 used m these routines is generally 
compatible with standard TTY I/O rautines. One incompatibility 

is thai the CHAR IN routine will not (except for graphics) echo 
the input led character lo the screen. If you mefely set the 
starting address for CHARIN and CHAROT in your system I/O 
vectors, you may find that you cannot see anylihing tiiat you 
type. If that is the case, use this patch in your program: 

2000 20 OA 30 INPUT JSR CHARIN 
2003 4G C5 30 OUTPLTT JMP CHAROT 
Now, when you jump to subroutine INPUT, it will input a 
character and also display it. CHAROT restores the accumulator 
when finished, so the data is preserved. 

Sometimes it is desirabie to input an entire line rather than 
just one character. This way you can edit and correct any 
mistakes, and the calling program only sees the final result. One 
way to do this is by using the first 64 bytes of page zero RAM as 
a line register. This program will accept up to one line of 
characters and store them in the line register. It returns to the 
calling program when you type a CARRIAGE RETURN. 

START LDXi^OO 

LOOP JSR CHARIN 

STA 00,X 

JSR CHAROT 
CMP#OD 
BNE LOOP 
RTS 
A simple program that will display an entire line at one time 
is: 

START LDX #00 

LOOP LDA OO.X 

JSR CHAROT 

CIVtP#)D 

BNE LOOP 

RTS 

Both of these programs work fine with displayed characters. 
Since the CHAROT routine sets the X-index to a number that 
corresponds to the cursor position. It can be used to index 
through the line register. One weakness that these programs 
share is that nondispJayed characters (LINEFEED, CLEAR, etc.) 
will not alter the X-index. This means that machtne codes cannot 
be used with these routines. If you want to use them, you must 
alter the routines to set the X- index to its proper value after each 
machine code. 



IDS 



INTERNATIONAL DATA SYSTEMS, INC. t..^^. 

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• Low coat on board baud rate 
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• Baud rates: 110, 150, 
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• Low power drain +5 vol Is and 
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• TTL compatible 

« All characters contain a atari 
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• AU connections go to a 44 pin 
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RS- 232/ TTL 
INTERFACE ' 

Part no. 111 



TAPE 
INTERFACE * 

9 Play and record Kansas Qty 
Standard tapes 

• Converts a low cost tape 
recorder to a distal recorder 

• Works up to 1200 baud 

• Digital in and out are TTL-Aerial 

• Output of board cotviecti to 
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• Earphone of recorder i»nnect8 
to input on board 

• Require! +5 volts, low power 

drain 

• Board $7.60; with parts $27.50 

• No coils 





8K 

STATIC 
RAM 

Part no, 300 

m 3K Altair bu^ memory 

• Uses 2102 Static memory chips 

• Memory protect 

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• Vector input option 

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• Board only $22.50; with parts 

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Part no. 232 

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Part no, 112 

• Tape Interface Direct Memory 
Atceee 

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Part 
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RF 
MODULATOR ' 

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• Power required is 12 volt* AC 
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« Board $7.60; with parts SlS.50 




Apple II 
Serial I/O 
Interface # 

Part No. 2 

« Baud rates up to 30,000 

• Bug» into Apple Peripheral 
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« Low-eurrent drain 

• RS^232 Input and Output 

SOFTWARE 

• Input and Output routine from 
monitor or BASIC to teletype or 
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• Program for using an Apple H 
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RS-X32/TTy* 
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Converts RS-232 lo 20mA ^^ 
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Board only $4.50, with 

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Stand alone TVT 

32 char/ Hue* 16 llties^ modifi- 
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Parallel ASCII (TIL) input 

Video output 

I K on board memory 

Output for computer con- 
trolled curser 

Auto scroll 

N on -destructive curser 
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Requires +5 volts at L5 amps^ 
nd -12 volts at 30 euA 

All 7400, TTL chips 

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MODEM 




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• Originate or A newer 

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« TTL input and output-»erial 

• Connect 8 ohm speaker and 
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• Uses XR FSK demodulator 

• Requires +5 volts 

• Board $7.60; with parts $27.50^ 




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Mention part number and description. For parts kits add "A" to part number. Shippng paid for orders 
accompanied by check, money order, or Master Oiarge, BankAmericard, or VISA number, expiration 
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107 



WnUam Sianery WBIWD 
132 Wesi Fourth A venue 
Rosetle NJ 07203 



Computerized Loop 
Antenna Design 

in BASIC 



Almost any time you 
see an article on small 
loop antennas, the author 
points out that such anten- 
nas are probably the least 
exptored by amateurs. 

Then he points out why 
that's so, and, indeed, you 
say, the little darlings can 
well stay unexplored. Their 
frighteningly low radiation 
resistance is almost instan- 
taneous discouragement. 

But tdare I risk noncon- 
formity among authors), al- 
though loop antennas are 
probably the least ex- 
plored by amateurs, they 
have much to offer. So 
much, in fact that it is 
almost astounding that the 
dipole is not given less 
attention. 

I, for one, am tired of 
seeing the radiation pat- 
terns of dipoles and having 
it pointed out to me even 
before I put one up that the 
damn thing is going to 
shoot most of my rf 
straight up unless I have 
two giant redwood trees 
and a chair lift 

The loop is small — at 
least as compared with its 
operating wavelength. It is 
directional — at least it 
can be rotated without 
having to move two giant 
redwoods a few hundred 

ja 108 



feet. It has a narrow band- 
width — and if you think 
that is a disadvantge, you 
haven't listened to at- 
mospheric noise in the 
summer on 80 meters. But 
it is tunable and could be 
remotely tuned with a 
motor, so bandwidth is not 
really a problem once the 
system is operational. 

Consider the alterna- 
tives: a dipole which in- 
trudes upon Eastern Air- 
lines' flight schedules or a 
vertical which requires a 
copper backyard for op- 
timum results. If 1 had 
enough copper to make a 
really good ground system 
for a vertical, I wouldn't 
use it for an antenna (as 
much as 1 love amateur 
radio), I'd melt the stuff 
and retire. Maybe put 
down a few radials of solid 
gold, which probably is 
cheaper. 

Small loop antennas can 
be the answer for the 
amateur with space and 
tower limitations who does 
not have a biological noise 
filter twixt his anvil bone 
and his stirrup bone. 

A magnetic loop anten- 
na, which does to the 
magnetic component of 
the rf wavefront what 
dipoles do to the electrical 



component, can almost be 
put in a cave and will still 
work. 

Ideally, it turns out, it 
should not be mounted in a 
cave, so you don't have to 
have one of those either. 
Its lowest radiation angle 
—and, hence, its most ef- 
fective position for DX — is 
about f ive*sixteenths wave- 
length above ground. At 80 
meters, that is only slightly 
more than a quarter wave 
or slightly more than 33 
feet. That's not bad, when 
a dipole would have to be 
part of a thundercloud to 
give the same yield, and 
then in only two directions. 

Mounted vertically, as it 
should be to maximize 
radiation resistance, the 
loop can be rotated to null 
out noise and QRM — kind 
of like a beam on 80, 

As you will probably 
have noticed if you are 
older than 12, there is no 
such thing as a free lunch. 
What price this miraculous 
antenna? Well, there is that 
radiation resistance thing,,. 

Radiation resistance 
does not exist, but it is 

measurable, and, if you 
want to be heard more 

than a block away, it is 
very, very important. 



In physics, accounting is 
strict, much stricter than a 
bank's ledger. If power 
goes into something and 
less power comes out, 
there has to be a reason. 
The credit and debit sides 
of the energy balance 
sheets must match. 

When you pump power 
into an antenna, the energy 
sets up standing fields near 
the system. There is less 
power in those fields and in 
the conductor itself than 
was pumped in there. So 
where did it go? tt went to 
that rare DX station's 
receiving antenna, that's 
where. 

Well, says the physicist 
accountant, if the system 
lost" that power to the 
ether'' — which doesn't 
exist either — there must 
be a reason- There the com* 
parison between dollar and 
electrical accountants 
ends. The electrical ac- 
countant may have to 
make his balance sheets 
match more accurately, 
but he engages in some 
practices which would 
land him in a federal pen if 
he tried them with bucks. 

He invents things which 
don't exist but at least ex- 
plain where the power 



li 



a 



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Rem Program designs small loop antennas and show effects 

Rem of alteHng various parameters 

Rem by William Stattery 

Rem October, 1977 

For K = 1 to 6: #"": next x 

# "loop antenna designer" 
Forx = 1 to5: r' ': next x 

# *'this program aids in tfie design" 

§ "of loop antennas small compared" 

# "to their operating frequencies" 
# 



tr 



n "enter data as requested/ 

For X = 1 lo 5000: next x 
For X = 1 to 20: #"'^: next x 
Input "Enter frequency", F 
# 

Input "Enter foop diameter", D 

Let K = D: Let Z = F 

# 

Gosub 1180 

# "the radiation resistance of a" 

# "loop antenna"; D; "feet in diameter" 

# "is"; R; "at"; F; **MHz' 



.il 



tJ 



# **loop antenna efficrency depends" 
#""on the diameter and composition'' 
#"of the conductor." 

# 

Input "Enter conductor diameter (inches)", 0(1) 

Let P = D (1) 

# 

#"ls the conductor copper or aluminum?" 

#"Enter A or C" 

Input A$ 

If AS = "C" then B$ - "copper" 

If A$ = "A" then B$ = "aluminum" 

Qosub 1200 

Gosub 1250 

# 

# "Do you wish to alter a parameter" 

# "And observe the effects? (Enter Y or NV 
Input 0$ 

If D$ = "Y" then 490 

If D$ = "H*' then #"Do you wish a new design?" 

If D$ = "N"then Input C$ 

If C$ = "Y" then 160 

End 

# "Do you wish to alter — " 
#"1. Frequency." 

#"2. Loop diameter.*' 

#"3. Conductor diameter." 

Input "Enter appropriate number"; C 

If C - 1 then 590 

If C = 2 then 870 

If C - 3 then 1030 

#" Enter your choice" 

GOTO 490 

Let F = 1.8 

Gosub 1180 

Gosub 1200 

Gosub 1250 

Let F - 3.8 

Gosub 1180 

Gosub 1200 

Gosub 1250 

Lei F = 7,2 

Gosub 1160 

Gosub 1200 

Gosub t250 

Fig. 1. Loop antenna 



710 Let F = 14.25 

720 Gosub 1180 

730 Gosub 1120 

740 Gosub 1250 

750 Let F = 21.2 

760 Gosub 1180 

770 Gosub 1200 

780 Gosub 1250 

790 Let F = 28.9 

800 Gosub 1180 

810 Gosub 1200 

820 Gosub 1250 

830 # "The formulae used in these cai 

840 § "culations are of insufficient" 

850 # "validity for frequencies above 10 meters. 

860 GOTO 410 

870 For X = 1 to 3 : r"': next x 

880 Let F ^ Z:LetD(1) = P 

890 Let D = 3 

900 # "Frequency in memory is"; F; "MHz" 

910 # "Conductor is"; B$; 0(1); "inches" 

920 # "In diameter" 

930 For X ^ 1 to 3000: next x 

940 # 

950 § Diam, Eff." 

960 for X = 1 to 8 

970 Gosub 1180 

980 Gosub 1200 

990 # D, E 

1000 Let D = D + 1 

1010 Next X 

1020 GOTO 410 

1030 For X = 1 to 3; #*"'; next x 

1040 # "Frequency in memory is", Z 

1050 n 

1060 # "Loop is"; B$ "and is"; d; "feet'' 

1070 #" in diameter": # 

1080 For X = 1 to 3000: next x 

1090 # 

1100 #"Diam. Eff/' 

1110 Let D<1) = .5 

1120 Forx = 1 to 10 

1130 Gosub 1180 

1135 Gosub 1200 

1140 #D(1) 

1150 LetD(1) = D(1) + .5 

1160 Nextx 

1170 GOTO 410 

1180 Let R = 31200*((3.14*(D/2)t2)/{9S4/F)t2)t2 

1190 RETURN 

1200 LetR(l) = SQRT(F)/(10O0*D(1)) 

1210 If AS = "A" then 1390 

1220 R(2) = B(1)*(3.14'D) 

1230 E = R/(R + R(2))*100 

1240 RETURN 

1250 For X = 1 to 3: #'"': next x 

1260 # "The loss resistance of" 

1270 # "a loop antenna"; D; "feet" 

1280 # "in diameter snf made of" 

1290 # *^D(1); "inch"; B$; "tubing" 

1300 # "is"; R(2); "Ohms at"; F; "MHz" 

1310 # 

1320 # "its radiation is"; R; "Ohms" 

1330 # 

1340 # 

1350 n "Its efficiency is"; E; "per cenf 

1360 n 

1370 For X = 1 to 5000: next x 

1380 RETURN 

1390 Let Rfl) ^ R{1)*1.28 

1400 GOTO 1220 

designer 



ti> 



109 



M 



LOOP ANTENNA DESIGNER 

TH!S PROGRAM AIDS IN THE DESIGN OF LOOP ANTENNAS 
SMALL COMPARED TO THEIR OPERATING FREQUENCIES 
ENTER DATA AS REQUESTED 
ENTER FREQUENCY 3.8 
ENTER LOOP DIAMETER 14 

The radiation resistance of a loop antenna 14 feet in diameter Is 
J 6427068 at 3.8 MHz 

Loop antenna eff Joiency depends on the diameter and composi- 
tion oJ the conductor 

ENTER CONDUCTOR DlAMETER(INCHES) 
3 

Is the conductor copper or aluminum? ENTER A OR C 
C 

The loss resistance of a loop antenna 14 feet in diameter and 
made of 3-inch copper tubing is .02867825 Ohms at 3,8 MHz 
its radiation resistance is .16427066 Ohms 
Its efficiency \s 85.181017 per cent 

Do you wish to alter a parameter and observe the effects? 
(ENTER Y OR N) 
Y 
Do you wfsh to alter— 

1. frequency 

2. loop diameter 

3. conductor diameter 

ENTER APPROPRIATE NUMBER 
1 

The loss resistance of a loop antenna 14 feet in diameter and 
made of 3-lnch copper tubing ts 1.9666901 E*02 at 1.8 MHz 
Its radiation resistance is S.2701934E-03 Ohms 
tts efficiency is 29.600793 percent 

(NOTE: Program repeats above paragraph substituting frequen- 
cies of 3,8, 7.2, 14,2, 21. 2> and 28.B MHz in the calcutatJons) 
The formulae used in calculations are of insufflcent validity for 
frequencies above 10 meters 

Do you wish to alter a parameter and observe the effects? 
(ENTER Y OR N) 
Y 
Do you wish lo alter — 

1. frequency 

2. loop diameter 

3. conductor diameter 

ENTER APPROPRIATE NUMBER 

2 

Frequency in memory is 3,8 MHz 

Loop is copper and is 3 Inches In diameter 

DIAMETER EFFICIENCY 

3 5.351 593 

4 1182175 

5 20.751192 

6 31.151973 



7 


41.810146 


6 


51J49839 


9 


60.4289? 


10 


67.68762 



Fig. 2. Loop antenna 



Do you wish to alter a parameter and observe the effects? 

(ENTER Y OR N) 

Y 

Do you wish to alter— 

1. frequency 

2. loop diameter 

3. conductor diameter 

ENTER APPROPRIATE NUMBER 
3 

Frequency in memory is 3 J MHz 
Loop is copper and Is 14 feet in diameter 
DIAMETER EFFICIENCY 

.5 24 

1 36 
1.5 48 

2 55 
2,5 61 

3 66 
3.5 68 

4 71 
4.5 74 

5 76 

Do you wish to alter a parameter and observe the effects? 
(ENTER Y OR N) 
N 

Do you wish a new design? 
Y 

ENTER FREQUENCY 14.35 
ENTER LOOP DIAMETER 6 

The radiation resistance of a !oop antenna 6 feet in diameter Is 
1.1270067 at 14.35 MHz 

Loop antenna efficiency depends on the diameter and composi- 
tion of the conductor. 
ENTER CONDUCTOR DIAMETER(INGHES) 
1 

Is the conductor copper or aluminum? ENTER A OR C 
A 

The loss resistance of a loop antenna 6 feet in diameter and 
made of 1-Inch aluminum tubing is ai395378E-02 Ohms at 14.35 
MH2 

Its radiation resistance Is 1.1270057 Ohms 
Its efficiency is 92.498743 per cent 
Do you wish to alter a parameter and observe the effects? 
(ENTER Y Ofl N) 
N 

Do you wish a new design? 
N 
ready 

designer — sample run. 



went. Radiation resistance 
is what he invents. 

As you've probably 
guessed, the more power 
lost to the ether, the 
quicker you'll win your 
WAC. 

Small loops have very 
little radiation resistance, 
but they do have, like any- 
thing else, true loss resis- 
tance. That ohmtc resis- 
tance eats up power and 
turns it into heat. And, 
unless Pitcalrn Island now 
has antennas sensitive into 

110 



the infrared, heat is wasted 
energy. 

But, what reaily matters 
is the ratio of radiation 
resistance to loss resis- 
tance. It determines the ef- 
ficiency of an antenna. If 
losses are kept low; com* 
pared to radiation resis- 
tance (no matter how low it 
is), efficiency is high. 

Practical loops may be 
as efficient as 80 per cent 
or more. 

If that doesn't impress 
you, run out to your 



mobile, call and chat with 
someone across the coun- 
try, and remember that 
your base-loaded whip has 
an efficiency somewhere 
in the single digits. 

Keeping loss resistance 
low is accomplished two 
ways. One is by reducing 
the resistance of joints. Ob- 
viously, the answer here is 
to reduce the number of 
joints and weld or carefully 
solder what joints there 
must be. 

Another is by increasing 



the size of the conductor, 
Rf flows on surfaces. In* 
crease surface areas, and 
you decrease resistance. 

There has to be an op* 
timum in here somewhere 
There is, but it depends on 
your QTH and pocket- 
book. Sewer pipe made out 
of copper is a great con- 
ductor at 3 MHz, but youil 
begin to wonder why they 
keep gold in Fort Knox. 

A 50-foot diameter loop 
is terrifically efficient, but 
your house can jump rope 




through it. 

Hence, the following 
program. 

Let me say that, in real 
Mfe, I am not an electronics 
engineer. I'm just a news- 
paper reporter, but that at 
least means 1 can read, and 
that's what it takes to learn 
enough about antenna de- 
sign and programming to 
come up with this master- 
piece. 

To be truthful, the only 
book larger than the one 
about what I don't know 



about antenna design is the 
one about what I don't 
know about programming. 

You can get a few more 
articles on small loops 
before building one. And 
you can probably get an 
education in inefficient 
program design by reading 
my loop antenna designer. 
You can also improve it. 

One addition might be a 
section to relate radiation 
resistance to height above 
ground. Another could 
compute the angle of the 



strongest radiation lobe for 
a given height. The for- 
mulas are not difficult and 
not difficult to obtain. 

You probably could sim- 
ply streamline this pro- 
gram to run better. It is 
written in Digital Group 
Maxi-BASIC and runs on 
my Z-80 system in much 
less than the 18K memory 
I've got. rd guess the 
BASIC takes up about 13K 
and the program about 
2.5K. 

I'm sure the program 



could be modified to fit 
any other BASIC, but then 
again I'm making that 
statement from the ''ex- 
pert'' position of a person 
who doesn't know a damn 
thing about any other 
BASIC. 

The antenna, I think, has 
promise. I have always 
found the most exciting 
part of amateur radio to be 
experimenting with sys- 
tems which push a meager 
amount of rf further. It's 
my kink.B 



Charles E. Thomas WA3MWM 
7022 Biackhawk 
Pittsburgh PA 1521B 



Trying to read game di- 
rections on a TV moni- 
tor at 1 200 baud can be a real 
rat race! 

Ever sihce I made the 
1200 baud rate conversion on 
my SWTPC 6800, all I hear 
are complaints from the game 
players who frequent my 
computer keyboard, (The 
conversion was based on a 
Kilobaud article by Jim Huff- 
man, "Speed Up Your 6800," 
No. 5, May, T971) 

I think the faster speed 
actually scares some people 
away from the keyboard 
(more than usual). If the 
player attempts to read the 
game directions at the 1200 
baud rate, he sometimes runs 
away even before the game 
begins. The alternative, of 
Qourse, i| to return to the 
original 300 baud rate sup- 
plied by the control board. 
This makes for very slow 
drawing of game maps and 
grids. 

If the player is given plen- 
ty of time to read the direc- 
tions before he starts the 
game, he might stay relaxed 
enough to enjoy it, so I use a 
subroutine to develop this 



Hey! Wait For Me! 



slowing computers 
to reading speed 



needed delay. The routine 
can be used every few sen- 
tences, especially if the direc- 
tions are rather lengthy. The 
subroutine, in BASIC, is 



XXX Last line of direction in your game program 

XXXGOSUB900 

XXX Your game program continues . . . 

900 FOR N - 1 TO 200 
910 NEXT N 
920 RETURN 

Fig, L Subroutine delay. 



shown in Fig. L The delay 
routine is found between 
lines 900 and 920. Be sure 
your variable character (N in 
my example) Is not used for 
anything else in the main 



Line #900 

N = 1 TO 1 25 
N = 1 TO 200 
N = 1 TO 300 
N = 1 TO 1 000 
N = 1 TO 5000 



program. Fig. 2 shows the 
approximate time delays en- 
countered with my SWTPC 
6800 8K BASIC Now your 
guests can relax white reading 
those game directions! ■ 

Approximate time delay for my 
SWTPC 6800 BK BASIC 

2 seconds 

3 seconds 

4 seconds 

1 5 seco nds 
70 seconds 



Fig, 2 Time delay values. 



111 ua 



JUAL TRACE 



15 MEGAHERTZ 




PORTABLE MINISCOPE 




MADE 
INTHi 

UmSmJkmt 



• Dual Trac«- 2 channel: separata, 
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• 15 megahem bwidwidth. 

• ExterBai and fntarnal trigger. 



Povver consumption less than 1 5W. 
Verticte Gain - 0.01 to 50 votts/dtv 

—12 settings. 
Weight is onhy 3 pounds* 



PECIFiCATIONS: 



FEATURES 

• Time Base - 0.1 microseconds to 
D.5 Sec/div - 21 settings* 

• Battery or Itne operatfon. 

• Automatic and line sync modes. 
ftfim the originator of ih^ Otgttai VottfrmtBr, Non-Unear Systems comes the MS -2 15 Mmiscope, ft fs a fine 

ef&ctrofiic instrument whf>a great deal of measuring capatifity and exceftent accuracy, its design is modem, utitiiing 
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Operating cttaracf eristics have been chosen so that the MS -2 J 5 wil/ make all of the measurements needed in 
servicing most efectranic eguipment. ft is fiefd-portabfe so fts use is not restricted to the bench. 



% 

n 



M>Dd«: 

Ax(t 
Vvrticl* Input: 



CHIh cm. CHI ft CH2 (Chopped) & CHt & CH2 jAl!) 
Tht FoUowing Specfftc^tmns itppfy tit tmch chmnntf 



lOmV/divlo &0V kn 12 CfllK&rmod rAn^^i, AifdIki'Wt: 

x1 4 0f?^V/dJ4 to lOV/div in tour rBngat, ssch contin- 

uoufiv vsrf^ibis 

iiZ-IOniV/divrioSOmV/d^ infpur ririQot, each cxintln- 

uoup^V vsnablo. 

](&-50fnV/diivto60mV/div in fouf rarig«j|^ MCti corttfn'^ 

Ac<^Uf9CV IS 3% 

InfMTt lmp#d«iica: 1 M ohm ihunlvd bv SO pF. 



AutomMic: 



iHtarral: 

Slapai 
Coupling: 
S Bruit hntif; 



iMVtil 



e*ndwid1li; 

RhH Hitm: 

Input Vol1ag« 
oriiootsl 



DC/QC la 1 B Mhi t6 db jDC toS Mhc 13 db}. AC. tBm« 
!■ DC down to 3H2; 

ApfkroidfflAtitlv 23 r^ @i 1 dJvitJon dflMvctioo. 
250 (TaKimum (DC ind PvaU ACl 



B*ndwidlh: 
Coufriii^: 



Inlffmil riin« Bafta or Evlafnil Hmaoniml. twiscrh 

i«l«ci«bli» In ttm XY mp&t. mntcmi iniKJt m Uirougn 

CMI and horiBDmsl iripul a through CH2 

DC 10 aOO KMi (t3 db| 

AC DC Of frouiid. vwllch Mt*^^* tOW fr*QUancv 

po^nt an AC IV 3 Hi. 
(npul ImpAdnoGK 1 M«q ohm ■hufiisd by 50 pF 
D*fl«ction Factor lOtriV/div to SOV/div in 11 cifibfBtod rflnpaa. 

tH« rsnon can b* ciiibrtiact vvrth ih« CH2 ^in cansmt 
(nptft Voltafffli 2gW muiitHiiVi (OC tntf f=^**lt AC) 
TliTM B«a*! O.tuS/dirw to OQ S«c/dhr 4n 21 ' caiibfatsd rang**, 

«« foNoiArt; 

■ r m5 O 1iiS/4vlolOOu5/div iO. ii$-0 2tiS/dt¥ to 

200 uS'*w 

]i5. uS-0 Si^ '' ^ (D ^OQ u€ / dnr a 1 . m$^> \ mS/cbv to 

ido mS dm^ 

■3. mS-O 2mS/4v to 200 mS/dhr kS, mS-OSmS/iftv 

to 500 mS/dfV 

jM m lour f*np<fc. aad^ eont^nuovtJy v*ri«tpi« (il«na« 

ino ^fH ff nt# t 1. ). tO. 100 I'Wrtttvflpmhw tn Mldddl- 

wisa pontion, oilitirMHl lim* mwnurcmtnu vm 



4S-15 Single Trace version of MS-215 



SwMp UrKHjarod fmm intamal trlQg«r sourca I In th« 
liiiBi tracfl rnode«, ih^ ini«rnal inmef tourcA ia CHI |. 
Triggor $ourc« is intarrtal cahbrfetBr fraqLioncv To ba 
uaed if ihef e 4i no oihoi trigger aou-m S'wpiJabha to 
svnchroni^a tho BvwMp, 

Trigger it derivad from hr>fl fraquancywhsn uaing tht 
battirrv chargtr 

Contrqia furnrtian aa for intsrna! trigganng 1 1 Mtgohm 
input impfldttnce^, 

Selects sync to poflitivd- of nagitnn- goirtg wawform, 
AC 

Less than 1 div for mtarnal triggw and laaa than 1 wott 
for extamjii trigger 

Triggar Laval control parmit i com inuoM a adju atmanf of 
trigflar point in all modaa axcapl Auto. 
Intamal Caiibratar A square- wbv« signal of 1 voH pp 1 &% ia provHdad. 

Frequency tt apprujumntaly 1KH2 

Diaplav 
Gfatkula; 4^ div. aw;h diviwon ia 2$ ifKh VJ«wJng a rat 

1 1"Hil 3S'W 
CRT: Sfuiah-white phoaphaf. madium periftenoa. CRT uiaft 

Igw paww«r fita-mMii ftsf kjw bailary ckam. Inaianl onl 

On-Soard BattviiM: Thrw MaM. rech4reaii:4« »a«d acid -^'^ Calto 
OfMratingTlma: Typically 4 lioura. 

CtiAtgifKg Tima Scx^pa OpM-pting: WIM run irKMit^itatv bul Hot r»ach lull 
charge 

Sixtean hours. 
Baltary chargar ! 1 5 vk 1220 ^4C on raquact} SO- 
4Q0Hi. I«si ihan t ^ wan*. 
S.r-HpS 4 WkS 0' D 
Waaght: Thraa pounda- 

EiwiroruTMnt 
O^artbne Tamparatufa: 0^ lo 40^ C 
£ ho^ and VtMvtk^ : Oavignvd to vwtTh vtand noiTTtal thock a Fid v^ 

anoountarad m csovnafcial •hipp«rtg and handling 



FiimlBlMd: 

Optional: 
Wanranlv: 



Tih stand, batiarv chsFgttr, 2 input cablatn and 3 

mtniatuta ban ana p^uga. 

Leather carrytng case and probea 

Ona year parti and labor. Made in tha U.S A 



MS-215 With RechargGabiti Batteries 

mrtd Charger 
$395.00 



Leather Carrying Case 

Thm i0»thmr sa^a has 2 swparate cprnparifnents Ohm Hf hckiihf sc^fM^ A 
otiTer 10 hofdltm charger. protfA. shouidar strap. »tc, Tha cata can b« wo 
an the befr. or owr bbe neck 

Tha sffaps used on iha casa ara "ana war", thaa oeetdaritaf stfikif^ 
tttt CMS* agatfiit an tsi^act tuftfi nor ando tha snaps of iat/tba fHJffad off t^ei 
bait 

41-140 $30 M 

Probes 

to to t 0robe with W megohm input 

Prot« itsas spftrtff hook ttp foe sura coftnectton. Cot^ptftsaiion natwofi 
htmad at the ccur/Mcrar tMher shmn «f the ptodm. Jfi as fcr katp wm t 
¥Might to a miftMmjm. 

41-741 $24.5 



Detune Combination Probe 

Switchabie tOtof/lt&J proife with a/i &ss<jrtm^nt afproi 

tips to suit arty situation. 

4t-3495 S34.B 



528900 




PRMRtTY 




$40.00 OFF 

On Any Accesories Purchased 
with MS-215 MTNISCOPE, Just 
Send or Mention the COUPON and 
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13 




• 15 megahertz bandwidth. 

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» Au1o<matic & lin« sync modes. 

• Power consumplion < 15 watts. 

• Vfffl^cot Gwn — ,01 to 50 V^dfv - 1Z settings ± 3%! 

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• Case nsjti ZT'Hx e.4 'W m. 7 5"D. 3 poiinda. 

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Epoxv Glass 1/16" 44 
pmcQn spaced Abh 



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$10.90 

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$9.74 

Gen Purpose D rP 
BD^rds wiih Bu^ Pa E tern 
tor Salder or Wtre Wrap. 
Ep<wy QIass 1/16" 44 
pin con spaced 156 



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$7.65 

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P paUf^FH pljg&osrds lor 
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44 pin cor spaced 156 



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fe«^ PC iKQ&di tif** cew 

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169P44-062XXP 

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PABINO- 

64 P4 4 062 

&4P44 062 
169P44-CI62 
169P84^Q62 



.042 dia holes on 
0.1 spacing for IC's 



SIZE 

4.5^6.5" 
4,&x 1?" 

«Zf 

4.5)(6vS" 
4.5x8 J" 
4.5x17" 
8.5 k 17" 



PRICE 

S 1.49 
S 3.S1 

PRICE 
S 1.70 
$210 
S 4 30 
S e 39 



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$10.00 EA. 

25 + Ca// For 



14 & 16 PIN 

3 LEVEL 

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SOCKETS 

14 T3 100 for 
$30.00 

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50 of ea. for $32.00 




ACE • All- for fast, solderiessp 
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10031W V\fooclley -,_. SepUveda CA. 91343 

Ttrms VISA. MC BAC. ttyick Monet Order. COO . U S ^gncs On^ LA rcsxdents Mid &% sates t3> Wn-ic- 

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Steve Efgsti 

2101 Fordham Cbve 

Austin TX 75723 



Morrow's 

Marvelous 

Monitor 



reviewing 
the Morrow front panel 



One of the finest, though 
u nhcralded, micropro- 
ces&or boards on the market 
today is the George Morrow 
CPU/ Front panel board, 
known as the '*Sigma 100/* It 
is being sold directly from 
Morrow's Micro-Stuff or 
through dealers around the 
country. Although it is being 
advertised innocently enough 



as a replacement front panel 
for the Altair or Imsai com- 
puters, it does far more than 
any other CPU system cur- 
rently being offered- The 
Morrow board also comprises 
the brains of the Equinox 
100 computer system from 
Parasitic Engineering, 

! first discovered the early 
version of the board in late 



1976, when my friend Jay 
Bell (computer freak of 
magnitude 9.9) called my 
attention to a miniscule ad 
George Marrow was running 
which offered a computer 
board at a ridiculous price. I 
hustled off a check, figuring 
at the time that, if computers 
turned out like my ham radio 
hobby, I would soon have a 




a 



roomful of blinking LEDs 
(which I now have}* 

My previous experience in 
computers was a frustrating 
FORTRAN course, watching 
jay*s toggle-switch acrobatics 
on an Altair, and articles in 
magazines that t didn't under- 
stand. I just plowed ahead 
and decided to learn as I 
went. TTiere*s a first lesson 
for be^nners here — go 
ahead, even if you aren't sure 
thai you know what youVe 
doing- This isn't ham radio 
where you need a license or 
can mess up an FAA airplane 
circuit if you misadfust a 
transmitter. 

I received my Morrow 
CPU board in a week. This is 
a fully-debugged working 
production model. There's no 
waiting months until the 
company gets into produc- 
tion and works out glitches. 
This is an important point 
because you see a lot of neat 
things advertised which aren't 
being shipped. 

The Morrow board itself is 
a nicely laid out double- sided 
job. Assembly is straight- 
forward. Stick sockets in, 
soider, and it works. 

Then comes the problem: 
What do you do with a com- 
puter when you don't know 
anything about computers? 
First of all, you need a power 
supply, case, and mother 
board with sockets to give the 
CPU board a home. You can 
get the works from Parasitic 
Engineering in their Equinox 
100, In addition to what I 
would best describe as a 
**moose power supply" (it 
powers 18 card slots — your 
money will run out before 
this power supply will}, the 
Equinox has a specially de- 
signed mother board, also 
from George Morrow. 

Next, you need some 
memory. There's another 
lesson here for beginners — 
pick a CPU that is compatible 
With your friends', or pick 
friends who have CPUs and 
mother boards like yours. 
That way, you can borrow a 
board or two of memory 
when you want to run some 
biggie program that hogs up 
memory. You can atso swap 



114 



boards for debugging — at 
your own risk, of course! 
After the memory is in 

and the power on, you begin 
tinkering with the keys on 
the front panel to see what 
happens. George doesn't 
swamp you with information, 
but you do get basic instruc- 
tions and a little program 
which makes the seven- 
segment LEDs count, h helps 
familiarize you with the oper- 
ation. The board's operation 
is so simple that, in about an 
hour, I had figMfed out 
basically what was happening 
inside the computer. The 
normal reaction is^ '*Why 
aren't all computers designed 
like this?" 

The control of the Morrow 
panel is set up in a perfectly 
rational way, so, if you can 
operate a pocket calculator, 
you can work a Morrow conv 
puter. You don't have to 
know anything about status 
lights, memory protect, ma- 
chine cycles, or nitty-gritty 
computer design to get going. 
There's no binary conversion, 
no flashing lights. The only 
switch on the board is a 
*Veset" switch, which sort of 
sends everything back to 
home when you mess up the 
program. There are twelve 
keys for control functions 
and ten LED seven- segment 
readouts to tell you what's 
going on- 

How Does It Work? 

Basically, the Morrow 
front panel/CPU works like 
this: There is a combination 
hard ware- software (called 
^'firmware*') which controls 
operation of the CPU and 
does all the work supervising 
the computer operation* In 
the normal 'Vun" mode, the 
CPU will go full speed just 
like anybody else's 8080 
CPU But now comes the neat 
part You can execute the 
program just one step at a 
time (called "single step- 
ping") or let the front panel 
step through it at any rate 
you want (called *'slow step- 
ping"}. I will discuss this in 
detail later. You can also put 
a **halt*' instruction in the 
program, and the front panel 



program will stop your pro- 
gram so that you can see 
what happened so far. Then 
you can continue from that 
point, at any speed from 
sing!e step to full run. Nor- 
mally, when an 8080 CPU 
reads a "halt" instruct ion^ it 
stops dead in its tracks, and 
you have to reset the whole 
works to get going again. 
Morrow's **halt** just pauses 
the program and leaves all the 
registers, memory, etc., atone, 
so you can continue from 
that point on. Now the 
"half* instruction is a truly 
useful programming aid. Pro- 
grams can be run in sections 
to help isolate the bugs more 
easily. 

In addition to the regular 
speed of operation, the 
Morrow CPU panel has four 
''modes'* of operation at step- 
ping speeds. The firmware 
program lets your program 
execute just one step, and 
then it takes over and dis- 
plays to you what you want 
to see. You can select the 
program counter where you 
took at the memory location 
and data, any register or pair^ 
any port location, or watch 
one memory location* You 
select whether it will execute 
just one step at a time or 
automatically step through 
your program. 

Pressing the ''M*' key wi! 



run the CPU normally, and 
the front panel will be in 
control for halts but will not 
display any data. The CPU 
simply runs too fast for any 
practical monitoring of data 
in this manner. Pressing "S" 
will stop the program, and 
the front panel program will 
be completely in command. 
Pressing *'S" while the front 
panel program is in operation 
will single step your program. 
Pressing the '*0'* and then 
"M'* keys is the normal mode 
which examines each memory 
location as the program is 
stepped. The six LED digits 
on the left tell you what 
memory location you are 
seeing — the first location rs 
000,000 (octal), then 000, 
001, etc., on up to 377,377, 
the last location in memory. 
The right three digits tell you 
what is in the memory loca- 
tion displayed. In Fig. 1(a), 
you see that, at location 
000,100, there is a 303, 
which would be executed as a 
jump instruction. Since this 
instruction requires two more 
bytes following for the 
address, you can press "E'* 
and the next memory 
location will be displayed (in 
the example, 000,101 would 
be displayed) along with the 
data in that location. Pressing 
''E'* again will display the 
next location (000,102) and 





LOCAT10«I 






DATA in 


1 f 




1 




\ 
1 


Q 


n\ 


^\0\3 



4 '^Q-m'* MQQS 



\L^\%\^^ 


^ / 




DATA IN 
REGISTER 










i 

i 








n 


i n 

' 1 u 


n 


' -i 






ff. '{•M^mDO£ 



Fig. L 

so on. To examine any mem- 
ory location, enter the loca- 
tion and press *'E", To 
deposit new data at any mem- 
ory location, first examine 
the location (enter the loca- 
tion and press "E"), ihen 
enter the data (which might 
be an instruction ot a data 
byte), and press '*D", If you 
press "D** again^ the same 
data will be deposited in the 
next memory location also. 
It is not necessary to examine 
each location before deposit- 
ing data. Each time you 
deposit data, the memory 
location will advance to the 
next location. Thus a long 
program can be entered in a 
reasonable amount of time. 
The next mode is the reg- 
ister mode. To enter, press 
the "V and then "M" keys. 
Two digits on the left 
indicate which of the 8080 
registers is displayed. The 
three or six (depending on 
whether it is a 16-bit pair or 
an 8-bit register) digits on the 
right indicate what is in the 




115 




register. In Fig. l(b)^ yoo are 

looking at register 15, the 
program counter. The next 
location that wil! be executed 
is 010,020. You can examine 
a register and deposit data 
just like the memory loca- 
tions. As you single or slow 
step through a program, you 
can watch a selected register 
or pair change. This is an 
extremely valuable tool in 
debugging programs. In most 
computers, it takes an elab- 
orate *^trace" program to per- 
form thi!> function. 

Since the accumulator 
(register A) is a standard 
register, you can watch the 
accumulator in the register 
mode. If you are building an 
interface to the outside world 
(such as a keyboard), this 
function can be useful in 
determining whether a prob- 
lem lies in the interface 
circuit or in your computer 
program. If you aren't getting 
data into the accumulator, 
the interface circuit isn't 
working. If data is getting 
into the accumulator regis terj 
your program is al fault- 
In another mode, the 
*'2-M'' mode, input ports may 
be examined and data may be 
outputted. During any part of 
your program, while the pro- 
gram is halted and the front 
panel is in control, data may 
be sent to any port, just as if 



you had written a section of 
computer program which 
moves data to an output port 

For example, if you have just 
built a device connected to 
the computer's output port 
which turns on relays and 
you want to test the relay 
interface circuits, you would 
enter the port mode and then 
examine the port your relays 
are connected to. By deposit- 
ing data into that port, you 
could see if the relays are 
turned on or not Again, you 
can isolate any problems to 
the computer program, the 
device interface circuit, or the 
device itself. As another 
example, say you've built an 
ana I og- to-digital converter 
board which takes analog 
values (voltages) and converts 
them to a digital number. By 
examining the A/D input 
port, you can determine if 
the board is working. By slow 
stepping a program which 
inputs the ports, you can 
watch the values change. 

The final mode is the 
**3-M" mode, which watches 
a particular memory location. 
The display looks the same as 
the "0-M** mode, where the 
left six digits represent the 
memory location and the 
right three represent the data. 
As the program is stepped 
through, the memory loca- 
tion will not change in the 



"3.M*' mode, but, if different 
data is put into the memory 
location, it will be displayed. 

Miscellaneous 

By now, you may have 
noticed that the Morrow 
front pane! /CPU bears a 
resemblance to the **trainers" 
which use similar LED 
schemes and to the new 
Heath 8080 computer ma- 
chine. It should be noted that 
the Morrow board is the only 
one with a selectable slow- 
step rate and with the **con- 
trolled halt" which does not 
require a CPU reset and lose 
all of the program informa- 
tion. The stepping rate of the 
slow step is determined by 
entering a value and then 
pressing *'S*'. Entering **^" 
and then '*S" runs the pro- 
gram very fast — it's good for 
clearing memory areas 
quickly —and entering**! 00" 
and then "S" will execute 
your program at about one 
step per second. 

An additional plus for the 
Morrow board is the SI 00 
bus. There^s complete com- 
patibility with the dozens and 
dozens of other computer 
boards on the market* The 
system is totally upward com- 
patible^ meaning that, as you 
begin to squander more and 
more money on computers^ 
you can use all that you have 




purchased so far. You might 
think that 18 slots in the 
Equinox computer are a lot, 
but fust wait , • , 

It doesn't take long to 
realize that there's more to a 
computer than fust getting 
the CPU board and power 
supply- You need memory 
and interface boards if you 
want to communicate with 
the machine via a keyboard 
and look at the results on a 
TV screen. That translates 
into money* Fortunately, the 
Morrow board allows you to 
use all ten LED readouts and 
eleven of the keys as input/ 
output ports. When the firm- 
ware program is not tising 
them, i.e., when the "M" key 
is pressed and the CPU Is 
going full blast, you can dis- 
play any segments of the 
readouts and input informa- 
tion from the keys. The **S" 
key is not usable, however, 
since pressing it anytime 
stops your programming. You 
cannot use the readouts or 
keys during any slow-step 
mode, since they are dedi- 
cated to the firmware pro- 
gram at this time. Still, the 
keys and readouts do provide 
at least somethings You can 
devise a frequency counter 
and u^e the readouts for fre* 
quency display, write a clock 
program which keeps time 
(none of this $9.95 stuff)^ or 
put input data into the read- 
outs to give you a visual 
indicator that data is being 
received. 

The LED displays are 
simply memory locations 
beginning at 377,000. The 
eight data lines drive each 
segment of an LED. By 
depositing a 117 octal, the 
segments forming a '*3" will 
turn on. With help from 
Morrow's instructions, you 
can easily make the readouts 
count Remember that^ when 
the front panel program takes 
over, all the information in 
the LEDs is lost, so the infor- 
mation needs to be stored at 
another location. 

The keypad is I/O ports 
376 and 377, As a key is 
pressed, a latch is set so that 
you can input any data com- 
binations from the keys. It's a 



n 



^ 



116 



[ittle bit cumbersome but sttll 
bettffl^ than togg!e switches. 

tn Conclusion 

Now that youVe looked at 
some of the features of the 
Morrow CPU board, 1 will 
briefly describe several appli- 
cations for which this com- 
puter is ideally suited. The 
first, and most obvious, is the 
educational value of seeing 
what is going on inside a 
computer as the program is 
running. Students can easily 
enter machine language pro- 



grams (in octal) and then run 
and debug the programs. As 

the student becomes more 
and more proficient, addi- 
tional boards — memory, 
analog/digital J interface, etc. 
— can be plugged in to make 
the system more sophisti- 
cated. I have found that, 
within the educational realm, 
the Morrow board is uniquely 
suited for students to learn 
computer control applica- 
tions, beginning with simple 
programs for simple control 
applications and progressing 




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into more and more compli- 
cated programs. Since data 
can be read from the LED 
displays and program param- 
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not be used. This is particu- 
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George Morrow, in his 
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panel board, has pretty well 
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visory-control firmware 
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Herbert M. Rosenthal KL7AE 
2941 Brandywine 
Anchorage AK 99502 



This article describes an 
*'L" network tuner for 
matching the nominal 
SO-Ohm impedance of the 
ftiodern transmitter to a 
random-length longwire an- 
tennai primarily for 80 and 
40^ but also useful for all the 
bands. The unusual feature of 
this tuner is that it is 
mounted up on the tower and 
is fed with coax and a control 
cable. The advantage of this 
system is that high- impedance 
rf is kept where it belongs — 
up in the air and out of the 
shack! Open wire feeders 
seem to be a thing of the 
past^ and bringing one end of 
a longwire into the shack to 
one of the modern day 

118 



matchbox-type couplers is 
one way to skin the cat, but 
not without bringing the 
radiating element — one end 
of the antenna — into areas 
conducive to TVI^ RFI, etc. 
The coupler I will describe 
has been in use since 1972 
(first In Kansas as W(JOC and 
then for two winters here in 
Alaska). It has survived 
below-zero weather, intense 
rain^ and very high winds. 

A remote control panel at 
the operating position per- 
mits separate adjustments of 
the rotary inductor and the 
large transmitting capacitor. 
My control also allows me to 
read the relative position of 
the L and the C so that a 
chart may be drawn with 
arbitrary meter settings 
(0-100) for each band in in- 
crements (25 kHz) for pre- 
setting the tuner. The control 



works in conjunction with an 
external directional watt- 
meter. Simply adjust the L 
and C for minimum reflected 
power and retune in the for- 
ward position for each set- 
ting. Having once made the 
chatty it is unnecessary to use 
the wattmeter each time. So 
you could borrow a watt- 
meter to calibrate your tuner 
once and then use the chart 
There is some minima! 
seasonal change in the setting, 
but this is not important. One 
may adjust for a zero re- 
flected power setting for any 
frequency with an antenna of 
any reasonable length, hori- 
zontal, vertical, or a combina- 
tion. I'd guess anything much 
over 50 feet would do. My 
present antenna is about 300 
feet long and works fine. The 
one in Kansas was almost 500 
feet long. 



Naturally, a good ground 
is required; the better the 
ground, the better the tuner 
works. I buried a few long 
ground rods in the base of the 
tower before the Concrete 
was poured. Since the unit 
bolts to the tower, a good 
ground will be had if your 
tower is well grounded, You 
might consider cutting some 
radials into your lawn with a 
flat-bladed ice chopper. The 
slits will self-seal in a short 
time. 

Circuit Description 

The inductor is a Johnson 
229-203 28 uH rotary in- 
ductor of some 30 turns. The 
capacitor is a Johnson 
154-10, 347 pF, 3 kV unit. 
Both of these items are avail- 
able from Whitehouse, as are 
couplers (Mtllen 39002), 
miscellaneous porcelain 
standoffs, panel bushings, and 
feed through insulators. 
Motors^ microswitches, re- 
lays^ and the components for 
the control panel are best 
obtained from Allied Elec- 
tronics. I had most of the 
**stuff" in my junk box. 
Some of it, like the Bodine 
gear head motors and 4PDT 
pushbuttons, is either no 
longer available or is now 
outrageously expensive. But a 
turn through the Whitehouse 
and Allied catalogs shows 
that just about everything can 
still be obtained new and at a 
total price of about $150 plus 
the cost of a waterproof 
metal box to house the unit. 
Using the L and C described, 
you can safely run 2 kW PEP. 

The L and C occupy a 
compartment within the en- 
closure. Nothing else is in this 
compartment, to minimize 
coupling rf Into the control 
circuitry, where it would cer- 
tainly find its way back 
into the shack, A second 
compartment houses the 
motors^ relays, limit switches, 
and tracking pots. Finally, 
there is a panel with a barrier 
strip for the control cable and 
a bulkhead connector for the 
RG-8/U, The enclosure has 
two flat strips of metatj each 
drilled for 2 U-bolts to hold 
everything on the tower at 



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whatever level you wish, Mine 
is about 45 feet up, which 
gives the antenna an inverted 
"L" shape from the top of 
the tower down to the feed- 
through, which extends out 
of the rf compartment, 
fncidentally, 1 use the 
double-pulley method to 
support the longwire. I have a 
pulley at the lop of the tower 
and a continuous loop 
of 3/8" plastic line through 
ihis and the base of the 
tower. This line in turn raises 
a second pulley to the top, 
where a second tine goes out 
to the antenna wire. In this 
manner^ if the antenna wire 
breaks, I simply lower the 
whole mess and start over 
without climbing the tower. 
Each motor is a reversible 
120 Vac motor (Hurst^ about 
$20 each). One with an out- 
put of 30 rpm is ideal for the 
inductor, and one with a 4 
rpm output is ideal for the 



capacitor. Limit switches 
(small microswitches with 
rollers on arms) sense the end 
of the roller (each way) or 
the max 7m in. of the capac- 
itor's rotation. Thus, when 
the Inductor reaches near 
maximum inductance^ the 
motor is automatically dis- 
connected, and the operator 
must reverse the control 
Signal to effect movement in 
the opposite direction. The 
remote console readout is 
accomplished by a 1 mil 
meter, a dc supply, and 5k 
wi rewound pots which track 
each motor. Obviously, a 
simple gear or pulley and belt 
system may be used for the 
capacitor and its pot which 
only turn Vi revolution (min, 
to max. capacity). You could 
even use different diameter 
gears (1 did) so that the Yi 
revolution of the capacitor 
turns the pot 3/4 turn to give 
a nice movement to the 1 mil 



meter in the control uniL The 
belt drive is second best, for 
bells slip and harden in very 
cold weather- Of course, not 
everyone has gears from old 
Command sets or bombsights, 
but they are still available 
through Boston Gear. All 
shafting is 14 inch. 

To get back to the 30- turn 
roller inductor, how do you 
track the pot for this? Simple 
— use a Geneva movement, a 
gear with one tooth on the 
motor shaft which meshes 
with a normal gear on the 
pot. With each turn of the 
roller^ the pot moves one 
tooth's equivalent roUlion. 
At the control panel you see 
the meter move, pause, move, 
etc. Since there Is nothing to 
keep this pot from **free 
whaling*' when the single 
tooth is not engaged, simply 
add an index tension arm of 
slight springiness, with a 
roller or vce bent into it, to 



fall in place each time the pot 
moves one tooth either way. 
It works. 

Next, how do you know 
when the rolter is at either of 
its limits? To keep the con- 
trol circuitry out of the rf 
compartment, use a %" push- 
rod, made of laminated fiber, 
held In place with Ya" panel 
bushings at each end of the 
coil with two epoxy glass 
blocks positioned along the 
rod with setscrews. As the 
roller contact wheel gels to 
its limit, it moves the rod in 
and out through a panel 
bearing. Outside the rf com- 
partment, mount the roller 
limit switches perpendicular 
to the panel on a bracket, and 
spring load the rod centered 
between switches. Now when 
the push rod moves either way 
at limit, the respective switch 
sees a dent in the rod and 
actuates. Drill the mounting 
holes for the switches a bit 



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large and you can correctly 
set the limit switches the first 
time. Remember to use a 
strong fiber rod — Plexi- 
glas'f'^ may snap after a 
while- The limit switches for 
the capacitor are easier to 
activate. A simple wheel 
around the capacitor shaft 
with one detent actuates the 
switches at each limit. 

Note in the schematic that 
two 25-volt, 2-Amp trans- 
formers are used back to 
back- The reason for this is 
simply to keep the control 
voltage down to the 25 V and 
eliminalc the hazard of 
having the 120 V on the 
tower. The low voltage is also 
used to control two relays in 
the tower unit. These relays, 
in turn, reduce the number of 
wires in the cable and permit 
a single transformer (step-up) 
to be used in the remote unit. 
Half of the low voltage is 
used in a half-wave dc supply 
(zeoer regulated to 6 V) 



which operates the meter cir- 
cuit. Two momentary lever 
switches {center off) and as 
many pilot lights as you 
fancy complete the control 
unit One lever switch is 
labeled "L" and "C", the 
other "INC" and "DEC," 
Operating just the first switch 
gives you either meter 
reading, while using both 
switches changes the par- 
ijcular element setting. There 
is a master on-off switch 
which you can eliminate if 
you can find lever switches or 
push*buttons with enough 
sections so that one section 
on each can be dedicated to 
this master switch function. 
There is a single pot in the 
meter circuit which adjusts 
the meter swing to full scale 
Note that one section of the 
L/C relay selects the proper 
remote pot. 

Construction 

The rotary coil and capac- 



itor are mounted on ceramic 
standoffs on a 1/8" alu- 
minum plate about 6*'x 14'*. 
Panel bushings (Vi) and in- 
sulated couplings (Millen) are 
used- An SO*239 is mounted 
at one end of the panel. All 
internal rf connections are 
made with 3/8" wide copper 
strips, including the lead to 
the output feedthrough* The 
inside portion of this insu- 
lator is assembled and pulled 
through the outside wall of 
the watertight box with a 
fishwife at final assembly. 
The outer cone of the insu- 
lator and its hardware are 
then Installed* 

To the first plate is affixed 
a second plate of 1/8" alu- 
minum , the same width but 
only 11" long, to permit ac- 
cess to the SO-239, This 
second plate is affixed with 
bolts and spacers cut from 
3/8'* copper tubing about 3'* 
long. To this second plate are 
mounted the motors, pots. 



relays, etc* The limit switches 
for the capacitor are placed 
on the outside of the first 
plate* As described before, 
the pushrod and micro- 
switches for the inductor are 
mounted on a bracket The 
barrier strip for the control 
cable goes on the outside of 
the second plate. Scraps of 
angle bracket are affixed to 
both plates, with holes for 
self -tapping screws. Now 
everything is slid into the 
watertight boXj held in with 
self -tapping screws which 
have some RTV or other 
goop smeared over their 
heads, and the unit is ready 
to install. It ends up with the 
L and C pointing up and the 
barrier strip on the bottom, 
recessed some 4'' up into the 
box. The bottom of the box 
facing the ground is open. My 
box is made of 18-gauge gal- 
vanised sheet metal, fastened 
with screws and sweat- 
soldered with a torch and 
acid core solder. It was then 
neutralized with baking soda 
and water^ dried, and primed 
with spray zinc chromate* It's 
been up a few years and, 
probably, \ should climb up 
with a tube of RTV and a can 
of primer . , . next year* 

Construction of the con- 
trol unit is left up to you. 
You would probably use a 
small cabinet and pane) to 
match your rig and a meter, 
switches, lamps, etc^ to suit 
your taste* 

That's it, I think a guy can 
scrounge quite a bit from 
friendly junk box owners. 
Radio Shack has some of the 
goodies you'll need for the 
control. Quite a few World 
War II rigs used rotary in- 
ductorSj and there are a 
million TX caps floating 
around, but Td recommend 
going the Whitehouse route 
(and Allied), if you can 
afford it. 

There's no reason why a 
guy couldn't hide this up in 
the attic, get onto a metal 
vent pipe for a ground, and 
simply hang up as much wire 
as he could. This tuner would 
get him on the air with a 
respectable signal. • 



130 



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days. If you're not 
completely satisfied 
with this superior 
transceiver, simply 
return It for full refund 
of purchase price. 



^^^F C3 

FOR RELIABILITY 





*SPECIAL PRICE OFFER EXPIRES JULY 31. ACT NOW! 

CALL 1 (800) 233-0250 TODAY 



121 



New Use 
For CB Antennas 



converting 'em for ham use 



TOP 
HAT 



"0" 4^4*' 



't'*4'7' 



V4T 






e'{ 3/4" 0-0,1 



>»u« 



TRiP METHODS TC"! 



I' 




STROPS 
PLfiSTiC 
TUBE 
i/4' 1.0. 

2TpF t3-6«V) 
CAP. FROM 
RG-e OR 
METAL ROO 
INSIDE PUC. 



- Rq-B (J'J 



/^O^J 




--StIFF 
4LMM 



COAX CAP 



Karl Schulte WA2KBZ/JY9KS 
223 Firestone Drive 
Hoffman Estates IL 601 95 



n 
n 



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iHC^ *Uf1lHiiti/0i rufiifV^ f^Off v£RSWftS ^Q' AftD "c*. 



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/ \ WOyNTlPtia 




i-a* riBr^EGLASS 



c 



3"- 4* 



2 



fQtH TffAP 



STAINLESS STEEL 
HOSE CLAW PS. 
A&SOHtEO- 
ALL VERSlODtS 



mtQO^H DOWELS 
F01* JOiMts 



U*- CO* If COMHECTOA 



C 



1 EA 4'4'' 'MINI 

Had* 



IMttT OF C B AWT | 



HAOlALS' 

3 



s/a* o.D 



D 



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FVC PIPE 



V* LD 



f/ij* 7. y45 can be seen^ a minimum of extra hardware (only a 

few hose clamps in two cases) is required, and yet a number of 
quite useful commercial<fUQhty antennas can be constructed^ 
The hose damps must be stainless steel. Afsot avoid over- 
tightening unless wooden dowels are inserted into the smaller 
tube of a joint The original joints are not as good as they 
could be, which is why you need the clamps and dowels. 



Have you ever wanted a 
cheap but effective 
commercial-quality antenna? 
Do you live in an area with- 
out any handy trees to hold 
up a wire? Perhaps you're a 
converted CBer and are 
wondering what to do with 
that "good buddy" antenna 
up on the roof. Even the 
lucky op With forty acres and 
rhombics for each compass 
direction may find this set of 
antennas both useful and 
interesting. 

tn order to convert a CB 
antenna, you first have to 
find one. I have seen various 
suitable types for sale 
through local classffied ads 
and from disgruntled CBers, I 
purchased my antenna from 
the local Montgomery Ward 
for only $16.00, as it had one 
small (and useless) piece 
missing. It was either a 



Hy-Gain "Silver Bullet" or a 
very similar Vi\ model. Al- 
most any of the many models 
and makes in use are suitable 
for these modifications or 
adaptations of them. 

Four variations are shown 
in the sketches in Pig^. 1 
through 7, together with 
several suggestions for pos- 
sible mounting and grounding 
methods for the average 
home lot- Two of the an- 
tennas, variants A and B 
(Fip. 2 and 3), need no 
additional parts except for 
the recommended stainless 
steel hose clamps. These are 
required in order to provide 
stronger joints than those 
used in the originaJ, The 
other two versions require 
only two standard sections of 
aluminum tubing from your 
local hardware store, plus a 
couple of short pieces of 
coax, PVC tubing, and some 
wire. 

Here are instructions for 
each type, variants A through 
Dj with a summary of the 
features of each, together 
with sketches and construc- 
tion notes. There are two 
methods shown for construct- 
ing the trap for the 10-40 
meter antenna. Although I 
have not tried it, the one 
using a dowel on the insidej 
PVC pipe outside, and the 
coaxial capacitor is not the 

■—TOP HAT 



^16 FT 

tOH M FT J 



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so ^o/r IS) M£r£fr 
^£ffFrCAL 



»»0T£ Direct co«fiiecTiQ»i 

TO COAX CONNECTOll* 
'^SMOVE ORlSrWAt, COIL 




COAX 
TO ftl6 



,t^ 

^ 



PL- 259 

SINCLE 
lN«Ul.ATfO 
ItflRC TO 
CENTER 



^ 7yHE;n*Rift 

ALL-eANO Uf«TUfilEO 
VenriCAL «»TH Tu1|£tt 



Fig, 2, Variant A —20 meter 
(or tSm) % X verticaL 



122 



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(7/B"J 



7"r 




EXTRA LENGTH 




WODinr OA'iGtilAL COIL 
TO A FEW TunNS4 1«t 
TO ltC£ONATE OH C£A|TER 
FREQUENCY DESlRCD 



tOflX TO RJG 

IFOff 40M (/*)i ySEl 



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smcve 

INSULAFED 
Wl«£ TO 
CENTER 



TUNER • mo 

ALL-auND UNTJTnEo" 

VERT5C4L *(TH TUNER 



FOR use AS 
A ^/%^ OH 
20 u. 



^ 



Fig. 3. Variant B — 40 meter (or tuned) vertical. 



stronger of the two. I [ust 
happened to have a heavy 
fiberglass rod the right size to 
construct a trap by the other 
method. Each model has been 
tried and works quite well. 

So pick the one that you 
like best, and remember that 
these ideas can apply to a 
complete homemade model, 
too, although without as easy 
a base mount Finally, don't 
forget the ground rod and 
radials for good performance* 

Variant A 

This is a 20 meter (or 15 



'D' 



SHOfftCN 
ev SLIO»N& 

r-a' tuTO 
"a* Fo« 

MilLSWR ON 

rA^tiftttE 

Fff£0 





AOJUST COIL 
(REMOVE ONE 

TUiRhi, OR SPREAD 
SLIGHTLY FOR 
atST MATCHJ 



X ro fiiil 



Fig. 5. Variant D — 10 meter 

i6 X vertical. 



meter) quarter-wave vertical 
antenna. (See Fig, 2.) By 
sliding the tubing together 
and clamping it, you cart 
shorten the antenna to 11 
feet or to 16 feet {±). Replace 
the base coil inside the insu- 
lator with a direct connec- 
tion. Modify the tubing to 
utilize the slot-and-clamp 
method for greater strength. 
No extra materials are re- 
quired except clamps. The 
original radials are not used, 
but heavy wire (#12-14} 
quarter-wave ± 5% insulated 
radials are a must, together 



GflOUNQ TO - 
MTG SRACKEt 
ONLY FOR 
LiCHTMtNG 
RUN mtRE AT 
an^le:. AWAT 
FfTOH RADIArOR 




lfNrui\i£^ ve^TtcJiL 



PJEC£ 



PIECE ^C 



(&/B" 0.0.1 



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iUSE Ttf L0« 
COAX FOR CA**f 

*»ltCE *TH" 
45/4' > 




T0P«1AT 



J'r 



10" ft-** 



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PIECC "Sc" 
iT^S'ODJ 



COIL (Off use ALUHINUU CUOTUCSLlNE 
FOAU FCtft STIFF COtLi 



TB^u xn CBCA HEAVY ALUHINUH 

AND tIpF Fhiri CUOTMESLIKE tOlk 

TO ANTENNA RU-I4H +' Dt AM.. E* TURNS 

YV «Fi rtnna ^Qo^t. CAP 



7 '8' 



PlECC ""A" 
BASE 



.^' 





HOSE CLAUP 
I SHIELD C04I- 
KECTS HtREL 



ICENTEH OF 
COAK HCRCI 



4A- 

— OIRECT 

CONNECTION 



OAK COHii 



FitlirE6LA&S 
ROO 

9£sr r/fAP coNsr^ucrtQ/v 



rtMtSftEO *4fm-itym JHItT£MftA 
tNOT to SCALEi 



Fig, 4. Variant C — 10 to 40 meter trap vertical. 



with a good ground at the 
base. The support pipe, if 
used, can be 8' or more to 
provide a fair ground, but it 
should be supplemented with 
several small rods wired to- 
gether. See the ground and 
radial suggestions in Fig, 6, 

Variant B 

This is a 40 meter (or 
tuned) vertical antenna, (See 
Fig. 3.} The useful height is 
28' with the top hat capaci- 
tive loading; only a few turns 



of #12 insulated wire in the 
base insulator (where the 
original coil was) will reso- 
nate at 7,1 MHz. The entire 
band will be covered. Use a 
good ground plus radial wires 
for best efficiency. This will 
also work on a portion of the 
15m band as a three-quarter 
wave verUcaL Note that if 
you only want to use a verti- 
cal radiator with a tuner, 
make a connection with a 
single insulated wire to the 
center of a PL-259. Using a 



LENGTHS SHOWN 
WILL ACT AS ft 
5/eJt VERTlCflL 
ON 20 METERS, 
AS RANDOM 0^ 
QTt4E'? QAflOS 
WltH A TUNER 



WOOD BLOCK TO 
LET ANTENNA 
CLEAfl EAVE& 




BURtED 

INSULATED — * 
RAOIALS 



" P*Pi. fiALV. 



TvmcML sRo^m^ MOimrms 



THIN [NOT TO DAMAGE SHtNELESl, 
INSULATED RADIAL. NO iS 



TV STTAHI^OFF 



HO iS - NO. lA 
RADkALS 



ClAMPmQ METHm-ALL VEfiStONS 



ST4INLESS HOSE 
CLAMP'CENTER OF SLOT 

_0. 



L. 



131:^. 



I* SLOT 




HOLD DOWJa WIRE WITH 
SHINSLES e¥ TYING TD 
riSMING LIKE AND 
OCNTLT SL!OlN<l tl«E 
ENOT m^H\.\ UNDER 
5KISIGLES. 



£MV£S MOuHTmS 



••«-9' ftOD CMIMI 



Fig. 6. Installation suggestions* 



123 




Wft-r OF 40M 



K -20 

*i' PIPE 



TO GIVE SLIGHT OiJ^fC- 
nONAt fAtTEftK OR 

DM 



40M 




Onif* LOOP 

/fo« hose 



COAK 
SHORT ROD 
flS TIE- 0» 
SUPPORT 
(SOTH EHBSr 



M 



I0-40U TRAP- 
VERTtCAk. OR 
TUHiO FTPC 
4LL B4M0 



4011 




f 



&' llt>05 
40M1E33') 

51 n COAX. 
PIPE ~--_IW HOSE 




WALL, 
VlMOOli 



TO m^ 



iGMTNtlllfi 
ARRtBTOR 



20ii 4 »era 

'*^EAtH RAQJAL tMlULATED, l>lli 
OF NO rfe oa La«5ER «!RE- 
C**« BE ay>»iED t *^EW iltCNtS 
mm.^ FOR S4FET*' HiOH H1Q:*l ««Lk WOflK Oil IS. 



Fig. 7- Variant C — suggested radial pattern. TJiis will provide 
efficient operation on each band^ A small amount of direc- 
tivity at low angles will be obtained by the pattern in the 
upper-left corner. 



roof (or eaves) mounting, run 

wire (thfough a feed through 
insulator) lo the tuner (with a 
ground system)* The extra 
length will be more efficient 
on 80 or 160m, and the 
vertical will allow some extra 



height over the usual subur- 
ban long wire- 
Variant C 

This is a 10 to 40 meter 
trap vertical antenna. (See 
Fig. 4.) Use the original base 



and the top two sections (C 
and D), Add the two new 8' 
tubes (X and Y). Cut off Y at 
T 9" from one end. The trap 
will be inserted between the 
two parts of Y. For instruc- 
tions for making the trap, see 
Fig. 4. The original kkIijIs 
may be used, if you wish, but 
they will have little effect on 
bands below 10 meters. Even 
on 10, they are not long 
enougt). See variant D for an 
idea for lengthening them for 

10m* 

This antenna will work on 

all bands from 10 through 40 

meters but with a tittle less 

bandwidth than the other ver- 

sion. Since the trap requires 

only a small inductance, the 

bandwidth reduction is not 

large. My model works over 

350 kHz on 40, all of 20, ail 

the CW end of 15, and! MHz 

of 10 with an swr between 

13 and 2* Only enough **L'' 

is needed to resonate the coil 

at 14,0 MHz. The values 

shown are what my unit 

needed. Fine tune the 

lengths. Note that 40, 20, and 



10 meter operation is easiestf 
but a little extra fudging with 
L/C will bring in 15m, too. 
Use a grip-dip meter with a 
small loop of wire at the base 
of the antenna to guide in 
adjustments. 

Variant D 

This is a 10 meter half- 
wave vertical antenna. (See 
Fig. 5.) By slightly shortening 
the original 11 meter antenna 
and tweaking the base 
matching coil, this version re- 
sults. The original tubing 
radials are retained. Most of 
10 meters will be covered, 
with 2 to 3 dB gain. This is 
the easiest conversion of all. 

A helpful suggestion: The 
radiats, as supplied, are not 
quarter wave and serve 
mainly to decouple the coax 
shield* By inserting and ad- 
justing aluminum rods, true 
quarter-wave radials can be 
had. This will improve the 
efficiency and lower the radi- 
ation angle. A ground rod is 
still desirable for safety and 
to reduce loss. ■ 



Come to Dallas!! 

Join thousands of Ham Radio 
& Computer Enthusiasts 
gathering for the Southwest^s 
top Ham & Hacker Huddle. 
With a giant flea marlcet on a 
paved lot, timely seminars, top 
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ladies* programs, great prizes, 
and a big barbeque, 
Ham-Com/78wiD be too 
much to miss. 



i^ 



^ 



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m 



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fyi 



jijii 






(/'^ 



f 



'£mi 



II A it. 



^S^4 



^^%>^ fc^ vmmiiimSimt. 



Ft*-. 



Pss- ^-i 






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mif£ 



M 



DUNFEY'S ROYAL COACH INN •3800 W. NORTHWEST HWY 

• FCC Tests An Day • Giant Flea Market 
« Microprocessor Seminar • Antenna 
Seminar • Ham Radio & the Law • RTTY and 
Microprocessors • AMSAT Demonstrations 
■ Fun Activities for the Whole Family 



HAM-COM 78 REGISTRATION : 



PRER£GISTBATI0N DEADLINE: JUNE 13, 1978 



Haai^Ott *7'S R«9l«tf«tloa ^ ^.00 per person for. 



MAME 



.people . 
-people 



5. 



r 
I 
I 
I 

■ .^eiiu t-iictri oi iiiuiiey oiucr lo: ,^„ endo^d mj elie«k er ■wcTonleT tor 

' Ham-Com/78, 3321 Towerwood Drive, Suite 101, Dallas, Texas 75234 

^^B ^^B ^^B ^^M ^^M ^^M ^^M ^^M ^^H ^^1 HH fl^H ^^1 ^^B ^^1 ^^1 ^| For A^klitk»\ailnfDnnacioncall@l4} 620^2775 ■■ 



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Ladfes LuJicheon & S^^Heshow tg. *5.00 per person for. peopk 

Flea Market auto registration (^ ^1.00 per mitomobfle space (pef CaS) . , . $. 
FIcd Mar|{£f second oulo spoc« (a ^00 per oulcmobie ^p^ce (per Cafl> , $, 
Doubte Room fcsr CNxibk Occupancy # *16jOO per person For 

people* Anwal d«te .......... 5. 

Single Room for SingI* Occypancy <g 525*00 per person for 

people* AiTfval ddte . *. 



Send check or money order to: 



I 

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124 



slinky 

SLINKY! 543.95 Kit A LOT olanieflna 
*n a MTTCE^ ^pace Hevn 9 inky® £li pole* 
iwjfh helicAf loading^ rKllatas a good 
ii|Fi4l It 1/10 Vtfaveliength lofigt 



>tfmf fi* UiBJiG 




m* vtii 



-I 1^ tiu mm'tiii 






lam [•»! ri (M.! 



■r-iifeaa 



*«ii 



"^aK^w viBiti 





FfllDISDig 

PC- a 



160 2M/SW RCVR 
1M 10M/5WRCVfl 

FW £i*t«t^to« 



' :7 


— ^ri — ' 

e 




■^■^ a I 



FT-301 Of FT-MI D 



14a 14 -4*^ 



This 9lectrlcaMy small €0/75, 40 
& 20 meter antenna operated at 
any lengtii from 24 to 70 ft. * no 
extra ba|yn or transmsjtch needed 

♦ portable — erects fit stores in 
minutes • smalf enough to fit in 
attic or apt •full legal power • 
low SWR over complete 80/75, 
40 Sf 20 meter bands • much 
lower aimospheric noise pjck-up 
Than a vertical & needs no radians 

• kit incl. a pr. of special ly- made 
4" dia. by 4" long coiis^ con- 
tainirig 335 ft of fdd^Ming con- 
ductor, b^lun, 50 ft RGSS/U 
coax^ PL2S9 connector, nyton 

ope & manual. 



_ ASTATIC 

MICROPHONES 



T-UQtniU4 MinkiitDirifBf .01.10 

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hfpiqi hf A'm. rFuioit) 

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MODEL }«• 







fi,^ 3*» ^ rilit &Luidud. HftOaivlAi Hi Hain » OQ 

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NiiL ZZi - "F'ttuli Wilnn 3 WnU * T«fl|M ■ ^ . - « ID.OC 

U Md. si J - fit! l-S-n ■««*. M^nwnnd. Oi«A# ........ fS [H 



PAWAVISE 

It's like no other tool you've ever 
used^ Its head r4>tates a full 360 
degrees — and tilts ISO degrees 
from vertical to h&ri^ontal. Imag- 
ine how that kind of ve^^satillty 
simiplifies work procedures, just 
one convenient knob locks^ \Afork 
In any desired position. 



PANAVI^SE offers a vafieTy of 
interchangeabte work holding 
heads, bases and accessories for 
every imaginable function. But, 
just because It's small, doesn't 
mean you can't use PA NA VISE 
for some pretty rugged work* U's 
a vise evef V craftsman deserves, 

MODEL 300 
Original Base 

De&tgneU tor all normal perma- 
nent instalJations. Three lugs 
spaced 120 degree^ apart provide 
max imum mounting stabiMty^ 
Overall heights 3-13/16*^ (97 
mm). Base diameter: 5" (127 
mm). 

MODEL 303 
Original Vise Head 
Wide 2yj" (63 mrm) jaws open to 
2%" (57 mm). Head is pressure 
dlecast aluminum alloy, with steel 
and brass lns« rts. Hammer tone 
9 ray /green firjsh. Replaceable 
nylon jaws. Pac'<age includes both 
Models 300 & 303 for $21 .95. 




TUFTS SELECTED TITLES OF 




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fiA&tC MAHCi90<fK. {Knh Eonkm) 




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— w 



TUFTS 

CATALOG 
INDEX 



Advanced EFectronics — 2 

Aide -5 

AMECO - 7 

Amphenol — 17 

As T sue - t 

Alias - B. 12 

Autek Research - 2, S 

Bencher - 17 

Bird - 7 

Bomar - 4 

8 a w - rs 

COE -- S 

CES-9 

CIR - 18 

Covflfcraft — 9 

Qnhcraf t - 1 0, 1 1 

D&ta Signal — 2, E 

Ountrdn — 4, 16 

Draks - 3 

ETO - IS 

Finco 6 

Ham Key — 13 

Htisiler '12 

HyGain 1 

ICOM - 15 

JW9R - 17 

KLM- 5.B. 15 

Kenvv<>cxd — 7 

Lanan — IS 

MidlBrKJ - 1 7 

MFi- 13 

MfCfow»v« RIter — 

Mofgiin - 1 5 

Meiiiy — 19 

Nemaric — 1 7 

NPC- 2 

NPC - 2 

Nve Viking- 2, 19 

OK Tools - 9 

Pana Vise — 1 

Pipo Communicattoni — 17 

RadiP Amateur CaJIbOOk - Ifl 

Rodney — 2 

Rolln — 6 

Sipfi« — 1 

S«v» Your RddiQ — 19 

Stinky ^ 1 

SST " 10 

Stiftgsf — € 

Swan " 4 

Taa/Aat - 1 7 

Telfltowfjir — 5 

Tiiftx — 7 

Tempo — 8 

TenT*c - 18 

TflXM B F - 1 7 

Tf ip^oti — 2 

Tri Ex -- 10 

Van Gofden —9 

Vibfoplex — 19 

VHF Eof - 14 

WiFtOfi Eli<CTromi3 Corp. — 19 

World Radio TV 

HandtxTok — 10 
W2ALI-8 
W2VS -8 
Yaetu —1 





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Tufts Radio Electronics • (617) 395^280 

TCI 



Radio Electronics 

209 Mystic Avenue 
Medford MA 02155 
(617} 395-8280 

FREE Gift With 
Everi| Order! 







PROGRAMMABLE CMOS KEYEK 

AUTEK RESEARCH 

aius CQ WHJif rO0 iffiAXf 

MODEL MK-1 

ONLY S99.50 

* 4 n^Mgai 

* Initant ncord or rcproorani 

- 0«iivfiid lof Novi^, B uMtM Bt 
CVi •?m^' Mid Cofumi OP 

Ai Alvtft«4 PTBffiHidUi ityir - M ^f t^ Uw«r TIim Mkir MIivy Kiywi 

mifr Awropwi ^(/Ar Jfwrt^ tArit^ fAf MiV I. jtiurittK nmmeir ittv*t\ ouf ^750 Ha $tO(k Art mw^ 4ivww «vt 

*OVAN<ID "MOS" MIMOItr flUi A G«fAT AUTOM^TfC KET£t 

^ r»« Vh' 1 BMj] vi#«q :^iMr 

* tAKftlC OftHATIOH, 5qy«niq iH ari ^rii Mil 

an^mm «tfe<Tuie don ind (Wihl i^iivv H iHR ia m 

D« attv^f dlHhti irtitai (Udila H« l^iHUld, nilc ing ^ii^ ivofk 

* f UlL CMDS EDiutruciP^Fi. Nb TTL iogc to >i«e1 up or 
^ijtw hieau-v currFnl Qiltirv (iflirifiiTM^ il dilirHJ. 410 m» f 
9V., EOrna, * 1J U.. l^picil) 

* ICLI^-COMPLttlNG diirl^Hn. JAmpiflOl. 

* lltinijvi FtF] pnyCicEtun S-b^- WW. 

■ Stlutt iFjmuEQE Di>tpu1 No rlicliHif iikiyi U (ill. fttic 
*H0 V ^ 4& mt. r^ bl«bi4 144 *200 tm. atNi4* 

k|^ rip, If ktf} 



Vm mii CO, RPi^^i I nhj^^. iHiii. am^ or wm 

Play Mil fKtirifriq B ollen s dnTPtl 

Ct<M^ bv tfi^lf lEC-ordJng owii Hw 4^0 IBIBip. No 

iKliirv fpi(H|rj[it[riiBa: sun lcitE tC'i to Qur 

LuiJl mil tin tnail iuBfnarv Ham ibdul 10G tiiAfBCtHL 

Elf Ik rniiuqi holds ibnut ?^ chnridiil, rlD|)«ndiny On 

£lHirBiLl(il iHO^Ih and j)4uki. ay, 'XCl CQ HI MGO¥D 

WIOVDCQ TESTK" 

''Coinbiro tfU" iwIilN Loni^inn 2 qHIhi 4 (rmstin for 

fHfl Intflh qf jIidliI hQ i^krxlirt, 1 1} . "HTH IS I A LA 

HAM€ IS BILL BILL AlG HH IS KW £S BEAM ES NEW 

MtMOIIT K£¥f H" 

HEfCAT llirtni ii|B m^ fiiiiili iHliI il»r Viri 

ifHiiil l«f Ban^ tQ'v or Ihh » MOAMS phli «t tnd |I 
Ca II « ■iMii. da ktiw HMfldkrihr wHJtl ar CO 
i^ I III, ii TQU SiT iAt% MD «M T f Ofl A UiJU 
AMKO CQIIfEST F£AIUiE£ 





4*4 »^iP^ 



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Kfl-400 Azimuth Rotatof 

Medium duty rotator, supports 
400 lbs (161 KG). Idea! for Long 
Boomers, HF tribanders. VHF 
arrays. Motor disc brake same 
as KR-500. also limit switches. 
Rotation is 1 min./360*' 
Accommodates masts 15- 
2-5"D (38-63.5 mm) Supplied 
with functfonai direction 
indicator. 115VAC. 50^ Hz 

Shipping weight is approx, 18 
lbs. iai6 KG). $129.95 




The only 
completely 
free-standing, 
tetescoptng, 
breakover tower 
you can buy. 



Now, for under $500, you can get the best deaf in the ham radio 
market today for compactness, power and performance — th© new 
ALDA 103. Unbelievable, but uge. 

Both brand new novices looking for that ideal first transceiver and 
seasoned hams wanting to treat themselves to a great second unit for 
mobile operation will turn on to the ALDA 103's totally broad- 
banded features. Can you believe fully automatic ON keying with 
automatic side step and RIT, too, so you can QSO with any make of 
transceiver without constant frequency correct ions? Or an intermod 
intercept point of better than lOdbm? Or the tremerwJous stability of 
a VFO osciHalor covering 5 to &.5 MHz (not switched)? And that's 
ji^t a sampling of the T03's superlative specs. 

You won't believe the ALDA I03's clean, simplified engineering arwi 
serviceability until you som it for yourself. So see the ALDA 103 
today . 

Prices S495 including microphone and mobile mount, too. 




Two NEW Rotors 
from Comel-Dubilier 




KR-500 Elevation Rotator 

KR-500 provides 180' lx»m 
rotation for antennas used in 
OSCAR. EME. etc Heavy duly, 
can be used with stacked 
arrays. Rotation, 1 mm for 160° 
Limil switches. Motor disc brake 
holds to 1750 inch'pounds 
(2000 cm-KG). Accommodates 
booms 1,25-1,625"D (31.75- 
41.27 mm), masts to 1,5-2.5 "D 
(38-63.5 mm). Weatherproof, 
Attractive direction indtcatof. 

115VAQ 50/60HZ. 

14 lbs. (6.34 KGK $169.95 



Th« only comp|it#IV frM-standing, t«lB^ 
icppinfi, brqakovHr tdw*r you can buy. 

THiv tiiffls«op«. Crank up Of down essily ^ 
piUpciirit best r«GeiiTi04l. 
ThwDf bfuJkow. Your fatt rtftwer have to 
IftVH tHe g/TQvnd wli#n vou pull iTi«ifk- 
lemnce - even on our talleft breakowr 

tOMftf 

Orv»-p«K« ptjtct- Yoti g«t th« w*ici1b ti>iwer. 
ready to install. ISJo extr« cHanies for bestf 
ptatrs. guv ymre^ etc 

OM-f«l)ickn^ craltimtn^iip. Every T«lft^ 
Tow'r ill cut, a£i»rnbtft{l, and nMskJed by 
hand. 

Old- fash loaned value. OrvOle Bond found » 
way to make belter tovwnrs f&r less mcpneV' 
Our model 40, which we believe is the most 
durat)le» convenient non-break:i;3uer 40- 
footer you can buy. h $199,60. Our Brf«k- 
owr Model 55, the iiniy lower you can bi#y 
that n t<3tally fnee-stamiiru^ tBiescoping, and 
a brtakover, is just untkr 9500. 
CwmpltTtly fraa^taftdlinv^ Met guy wnres^ no 
brackets. Vei^ bv sfreichintfj ih* wndlDad 
over t^e enthre t&ivm, we've made thern 
ttronger than wired or btacketed towtfi. 

65 Concrete Sle^vrs $33,0Q 

*0 Concreie Sleei^e $32.50 

leiitendi from 33''40'1 S224;31 

'Matfel S^B 

(•^TancJt from 33'-6S') ..,.,-.... S4l0.ie 

Broakaver Model 4D 

laxie^ndt from 23'-40^, wijth bre^kovai at 

Qraurid tovel} $381.30 

Breakover Made1 GS 

Uvtendi from 23'-SB'p with breakovor at 

ground level) ...,,., tS73.65 




TOIL TWISTER"* 



HAM IE 




o-f the 
anten- 



• For the New Super 
Communicatioi^s Antennas 

■ New ThickwaH Casting 

■ New Steel Ring Gear 

• New Metal Pinion Gear 

• New Motor Prebrake 

■ New Super Wedge Brake 

■ New L.E.D, Control Bok 

■ Safe 26 VoU Operation 
Oesigried for the newest 
king-size communication^ „ _._ 
na5, the TAIL TWISTER^"^ H the 
ultimate in antenna rotational 
devices. The TAIL TWISTER^*^ 
starts with a deluxe control bo^ 
featuring snap action controls for 
brake and directional controls; 
UE.D, rndlcatOTs signal rotation 
and brake operatioii, while the 
iltuminated meter provides direc- 
tion readout. This new control 
box couples to the newest beM 
rotor* Using the time tested bel3 
rotof principle, the TAI L TWIST- 
Ep^TM Is Q brand new design with 
thickwall castings and six. bolt 
assembly. A brand new motor 
with prebrake action brir>gs the 
antenna system to en easy itop, 
while the massive square frortt 
brake wedge locks the assembly in 
place* A new stainless steel spur 
qear system provides finel dfive 



Into a new steel rin^ gear for tstal 
reliability. Triple race, 138 ball 
bearing assembly carries dead 
weight and mairi tains horizontal 
stability. 

An optional he^vy duty lower 
mast adaptor is available for light- 
er loads with mast mounting. 
Price: $259-00 

The HAM III sets new levels of 
performance. Snap action 
switched wedge brake and rota^ 
tional controls brings pinpoint 
accuracy to iarge directional ar- 
rays popular in communications. 
A new motor provides pre brake 
action to assist in slowing down 
rotatl^onal mass, ar>d the new 
thicker wedge brake offers far 
stronger lock- in phase action* To 
take full advantage of this new| 
design, the HAM III is designed^ 
for in-tower mounting. A newi 
optional heavy duty lower mast' 
adaptor is available when the^ 
HAM 111 Is to be mast mounted 
with smaller arrays* A stainless; 
steel spur gear system miilliplies: 
the torque into l^e dual race 98; 
ball bearing support assembly i 
assuring years of trouble free per- 
formance- Price: $139.00. 



Tufts Radio Electronics • (617} 395^280 

TC-5 



TELEX. 



PROFESSIONAL HEADPHONES 
& HEADSETS 




lEJOl I'ttttPt Mvh>rh *< i 111' lpFS«d jrvtlliiharl i-ntvnTHnitnl i;ii Innl irr>ii' afido qr«v ■m\'\*t t\tmH- N rt*i 



MODE 


CtIO 


Sm 610 


C IJIO 


C 1320 


CMtlQ 


CMT2I0 


CM \m 


EM- ISMS 


Hr«4itMiit)niSintitihriiif 
Ad OQQlOtfwir'Cfn'' 
PliilWdllMit liHi 




1 &3dB SPL 
— 4(ni 


1 niAE ^?i 


lObftBSPt 


t034BSPl 




'^6 


m&dBSPi 


tspc^'' ^ 


•■^ 


JSOHtttii 


J? 


3T 

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i 7 


It 


3? 


"TZZ, 










iiO 50 U U 
imOHi KKCiU nOOHt WOElKr 


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ttil* 


Ht^ 1 


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fT*^!* 


Bvla* 1 <taivm\aniia\ 
i] ikH.- 












5TdH 




bfdfl 


Pfic«; 


'i-'i '-': 


t-l 1. TiP, 


5r*^i :n] 


137.30 


SJa.BO 


$56.90 


see. 30 


$54.60 




• t^ •(? tr If 

Model C610 ^ '^ ' 

(SWL 610} Model C 1320 Model CM 610 Model C 121Q 



theindi 




THRUUNE 
WATTMFTIR 

MODEL 43 








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JVIM 


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100H 


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I'^iOti mMti 


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'^Qoa im*n% 


moon 











Elements (Table 1) 2-30 MHr 
Elements (Table 1) 26^1000 MHz 

Carrying cas^ for Model 43 Et 6 elemer^t^ 

Carrying ca^e for 12 elements 



$120 
42 
36 
26 
10 



READ BF WATTS DIRECTLY! (Specrfy Type N or S0239 con- 
nectors) 0.45 - 2300 MHz, 1-10,000 Watts ±5%, low insertion VSWR 
*— 1.05^ Unequalled economy and flexibility. Buy only the elementfs) 
covering your present frequency and power needs, add extra ranges 
later if your requirements expand. 






Model CM 1210 



Model CM 1320 Model CM 1320S 




Mow you can receive the weak signali with thfi Ameco PT-2 pre-ampitfiarl 

Model PT 2 is a conttnuous tuning 6-160 
meter Pre Amp ^ecifically designed for use 
with it transceiver. The PT-2 coinbines the 
feattifes of the vti*ll known PT vtfith nevv 
sophis^ticated control circuitry that permits 
it to be added to virtually any transceiver 
with No modification. No serious ham can 
be without one. Price: $69^95. 

• IntprovM ieiuilivily and 4i|^ful ItMioLw tulm^ 
■ llocHitA hIjE^iuiIa up to 26 db. 

• For AM or SSB. 
« Bypaaifs ilnHf AuloTnalically wtirn the (ntiM'rivfT ii iTmmmiltjri^. ALnAE^vW 

• f£T implrrirr p\r§ pupenor ctom mi^diiIalM»n prot«cticHi. 

• il^impl? lo ihitlalL * Ad%-UK:«cl sc^id-ftile cvcuilri^ 

• trtipravn imfnitnity to Uanaectter lit»nl-«fid rjrvtjioftd lt¥ uw of iU Iniitt-in allrnijitur. 

• F^iiTiie* mMMtfT powfr cqnlroJ ftm italiofi equipinnil'^ 




ALL BAND PREAMPLIFIERS 



o:"^ 



^ '^. ^, 



J xy n. .^ 



^M'lzr^ 6 



The NEW KENWOOD TS-820S transceiver 

S820S now has factory installed digital readout • 160 thru 10 
leter coverage • 200 watts PEP • Integral iF shift •Noise blanker • 
OX 8t PLL c3rcuitrv»DRSdial»IF out.RTTY, XVTR capabilities 
Phona patch IN and OUT term ma Is • RF speech processor. 
1098.00. 




AMECO 



• 6 THRU T 60 METERS 
•TWO MODELS AVAILABLE 

• RECOMMENOEDFOR 
REQEIVER USE ONLY 

• IKCIUDES POWER SUPPLY 



MODEL PLF employs a dual 
gate FET providing noise fig- 
ures of 1-5 to 3.4 db., de- 
pending upon the band. The 
weak signal performance of 
most receivers as well ^s image 
and spurious rejection are 
greatly improved. Overall gain 
is in excess of 20 db- Panel 
contains switching that transr 
fers the antenna directly to 
the receiver or to the Preamp. 
Model PLF 117V AC, 60 H^. 
Wired & Tested ..,,,, S44.00 



Model PC LP Uses 
nuvistor 



$44.00 






^SMPRICE LIST 



t^od ei) Dc^cr I F> f ion 

4f EQUIPMENT 820 PACESETTER SERIES 

r&820S 



rS820 

5G 1 
/FO-B20 



5P 820 

::W830 

i20 SEniES 
rS520S 



/FO 520S 
iP 520 
=W-S30 

5-599 

::c 29A 

= M 599A 



T&820 D«Iuk6 Transc:tttv«r with P+^iial: Dtsplav 

{DG IJ installed. ISO 10 meters. IF shift 

DeluxQ HF Tran^ceivfiir 160-10 metvi, BF speech 

processor, IF shifty RF negative feecfbock 

Digital Frequency Display for T&320 

Deluxe RemotQ VFO for S20 Series, Includes its 

own R I T circuit; frequency reads uul on transcetver'J 
digital display 

Deluite External Speaker. Includes audio filters 
for addfrd ^er»rjittv on receive, 2 audio inpuu 
500 Hz CW Filter for TS B20 

160-10 HF Transceivef. Digital DrspJav (optioni 

speeds procen^or, RF attenuator^ supsr floise ttfank^r 

Prgiidl Ditpiay for TS-52dS. Poubtes ai a 

f risciuency counter, too! Acfaptable to TS-520 

and 599 s4rie5 

Remote VFO for TS^&20S, Built in RIT circuit 

provides super operating flexibility 

Matching External Sponk^ir for TS-S20S. S Ohms. 

Froquoncy rflsponsB 100 5000 Hz 

500 Hi CW Filter for TS-520 

160 10 Solod State AfTsateur Receivar. 
2 and & meta^s (optionelL S5B, CW, AM, 
FM Transcelves/splils wjiti T-S590 
80-10 Metet Amateur Transmittar, Solid 
Slate {ftKcept driver and^mats). Stfni break ^n., 
sfdetone, butit m powar iuppiy 
Extem^l Speaks' for 599 Series. 8 QhmL, 
Freouency response; 10O 50O0 Hi 



2 Meter Converter for 
6 Meter Convertef (or 
FM Filter for R-5990 



R 
R. 



B990 
599 D 



^ ^^5Q6LLftNEOUS 



'w^^MHHi 





Prica 

1.098.00 

919,00 

179.00 
149.00 

49.00 
49.00 

739.00 
l39,0O 

135.00 
30.00 
49.00 

549.00 
549.00 

25.00 

35.00 
35.00 
45,00 

242 .QQ 



Antenna Tuner. Includes an t en na^ coupler, 
SWR me'ter, pov¥«r metAr, antenna swilctl. 20QW 
Deluxe 160 ID Unear Amplififtr. 2 KW P€P 
2 K 3-SOOZ tub^, rugg&d built in power supply 
Pigital Adaptor Kit fTS>-520f 
DC- DC Converter for TS'820/TS-S20S Series 
EQUIPMENT 

6 IVleter All Mode Transceiver. SSB, CW, F M, 
AM, 10 wsti^. Built in AC/DC power ^upprtes 
2 Meter All Mod« Transceiver. SSB, CW, FM, 
AM, semi break in, CWsidatonE. Digjtal readout, 
receiver pro amp 

Eicternal VFO for TS- 700S. Frequency dJtplays 
on T&700S, Special ^^frequericy ctieck*' feature 
8 Ortms Extivnal Speaker Matches TS-600 and 
TS-700S. Enceltent frequencv T-esponse 
2 Meter PoriaU^e Transceiver. F M, 12 cnannels 
(6 supplied); Nl-CAO baiter ies^ charger aj-e included 
2 Meter SynTt%esize<l TranMtcetver. 25 Watts^ 800 
channels^ 4 MHr^ continuous tone-coded Sduelcli 
f option!^ 

2 Meter FM Transceiv^ ; digital readout, one 
knobchannet setector sysiem, 1 O vhratts output 
70 CM FM Transceiver. 23 channels 13 supplied). 
10 watts, broadband design 
2 Meter Transverter, S watts; SSB and CW 
easily hooks up to 520/820 Series 
6 Meter Transverler, 10 t^nitit; SSB and CW, 
easily haaks up to 520/820 Series 
OTHfcR ACCESSOR ffcS 



AT- 200 

TL-922 

DK^520 
OS-1A 

VHF/UHF 
T&600 

TS-700S 
VFO 700S 

T Ft- 2200 A 
TR-74O0A 

TF?-7500 
TR-a300 
TV'502S 
TV 506 



HSm4 

Me^i A 

M&50 
PS- 5 



P&6 



FS^S 



■^^\^^^^° 



t\tcXtowcs 



MOXS 



KENWOOD Haadptione set (SQhms) 

Mobile bracket for TR 2200 A 

Dynamic Microphone for all KENWOOD 

statiDOS <Hi/Lo Z) 

AC Pouver Supply; 12 VDC ^ 3.5 Amps. 

tnatches TR 8300: built in digital ctock 

with timer 

AC Power Supply; 12 VOC ® 3.5 Ampjj 

matches TR 7 500; S Ohm speaker Includod 

AC Power Supply; 1 2 VDC ^ 8 Amps; 

matches TR 7400A; well rflgulat&d; currant 

\in\it\nfli ^^ ^r^r^ 

VOX ynit ^Ot TS-^00^ anO T^ 6QQ 



149.00 
TBA 

6S.00 
699.00 

729.00 

129.00 

3O.00 

229.0O 

399.00 

299.00 
299.00 
TBA 
249.00 



1&00 

13.00 
39.50 

79.00 



79.00 
129.00 



S^.QO 







I C-21 1 

4 MEG, Muttj-mod^ 
2 Meter Transcfliv^ 
Atl MQOe 

> 144*14& MHi opefatJOTF on SSB and CVi 
?s wvB wOt }4$-t4f MHf onxmffitpn on fU is 
possibteiiiiltiirielC-2lt Try 144 MHi DX or 
fust ic»cal rsg Ctm^ wntfi Ittanda Viofk the 
Amsai Oscar sii or ieuten usmg the lC-211 
for eOhm th« rec«tvef Of tiarsmiiltr, 

TUNING SYSTEM 

* A iarg« weigiiiad l»ywti«ei hno& moimtad 
«iih igwr (ncfion t)Ol b^snngs s used lo clm« 
an optica* cNoppef to pfovuic? puilses ki ttie 
■COM LSI synUiesLUfir A t7 leaking 
■tiechanism, whicli ofi«raie« meihally. 
^Nanges to provide a smootti feel a1 sHMr 
^oe«<ls Similar So t^ oid PTO type yiiH^ 

fyLL FUNCTIONS BUILTIN 
puBe type noise biarukef 
VOX Willi ad|ust»ig ^OX gwi. anuvox 
semf-t^^^h-ifl C W Operatiofi 
Buiri in SWP bridge 

automaliC powet control 

AC Of DC operatic^ 

■ Thie synthe^jj^f designed by ICOM ai>d 

<mplieni«nted in rhe propne^ry LSI ctiip cqy- 

eraies in 1 DO Hz slops from 144 m 1 46 MHz 

arrd in S KH/ step$ from 1 46 to 1 4Q MHz for 

F^ opetdl^on 

- The IC 21 T contains boiti me 1 1 7VAC arid 

the 13 6VDC noi^tm supplies. 




ID 245 

146 MH^ FM 10 W Transceiver 

- Th^ ICOM dfiva loped LSI synthesiser wi1h 
4 digit LED readoyl in the IC-245 Gtfers Ihe 
moat Tor mobilOi In FM, th0 Synth estzer 

command Irequency Js dlspl^iysd in B KHz 
steps irom 146 to 148 MH^. and with Ihe 
sideband adapter Ihe step rate drops to 100 
H^i from 144 to 146 MHz For ma?(irnum re- 
peater flexibility, [he trani^mil and recaJve fra- 
Qu<}ndesare independontiy pro^ramable on 
any ssparatJon The IC-24S ©ven comes 
equipped m\h g muHlple pJfl MotoM coftnedor 
fof remote conirol 

* Optional DqMipmef^t tor th* tC*245 Includes 
a single Wideband adapK^r which attaches as 
an intecirel pait oE th^ transceiver W^th this 
easy to make convefsion; you/ IC-24S oper- 
ales in boUi FM and SSe^CW modes. 




I022S 

146 MHz FM low Transceiver 
- The fi^equeficy sy nlhesj zee can\x pf^eser to 
any 15 KHz 4^%mmii mtween 146 and 14S 
mix 1^ Ihe diod* nwiria boe^tl Thc& fro- 
quancy may be oIlMt try 606 KHz Ngfier ttian 
Om pwgfmn hw^umut^. To pravtde e im# ay$t 
MmmtotA M£rt«icin0 ouafcry "* li*WB atom- 

^2l^Siiry"™**^ *^ '"aa^ y&no 




ICOM 



IC-502 

6Meter SSB St CW PortablQ 
- Get m on t^« tun of wofkjrig 6 meters wTth 
this great podable rad». Opereto QliP on 6 
SSS 01 CW witti Ihis self oonliineii !rans- 
ceiiMf, MMyhiifaiij flrfcnrta arxl bnlsfy poA 
(N'^cad^ ar^ charger are rycm available ) 
Gf^ it and tak& it vnPi you «tierefver you go 
... Mi lop« lakeside or car. The abrnmum 
dtoca:^ frame provides a rug^etl radio tor 
travel TTvee wa^ P£P and tne siabte VFD 
mike tor fim ^nd Ffi OSO s. There i» even 
an RIT for ttie receive, as Mell as a true IF 
notse blar^ker that really iror^ on six 

• Tne VFO used in the iC-502 covers me 
firsl @00 KHz ol Uie 6 meter band where 
most of ttie a^viy is. The qi co lon ! stability 
ol Ihe VFO and the smcxrifi lumng dial make 
operating the K>502 even m caka mountan 
top cimaies a pleasure worth (he afloft of 
getting there. The three wm PEP ilgnal re- 
alty gets through when the bend is open and 
provides syfftcieni (irive for ar> ABl type 
linear 



^ 
1 




10^215 

2 Meter FM portable 

• An eKtrem^Fy rugged, hrgh quality, radio 
with 1 5 channel capacity. 

♦ The C" size cells may be replaced with 
rechargeatile cells of Ihe same size and very 
Sim pie modithcation made To provide FULL 
CHARGE from either the auto electrical sys- 
tem or the IC-3PS power suppiy while the 
tQ-2l^ is m operatkOTf.' This t^ature is possi- 
ble due to the 00-20 battery pack and 
chargef. 




^^P»*tm fh^ g^ 



iC^202 

2 Meter SSB Portable 

« A full 3 watts PEP from this compact 
trwi^^eiver is plerrty ol punch whan the tml 
IS open. TT\ree wans PEP wii also cfim mosl 
home-brew amps 10 futi ou^uT or imr op- 
bortal ampifier lo 10 watts 

• This una also rndudes airuBlE nooe 



nut. 



SM^2 

lOMM 

IDDCC (22S) 

IC'DCC (std) 

lOPC 

BBD 

9PP 

24PP 
24PP set 



'^O'^E'- IC-24B 499.00 

IC-22S 299.00 I0245/SSB 599.00 

IO30A 399,00 IC-502 249.00 

lC-202 259.00 IO50L 98,00 

IO20L 98.00 (C-701 AC 1,499.00 

10-211 749.00 10-701 DC PRICE 

IC-215 229.00 ID3PS 99,00 

10^215/60-20 249.00 IC-3PE 99.00 

Mobile M!c fspecify modeO ...$18.00 

Electret Base M ic (for 4 pin mic connj . . ^ , , , , * , 34.50 

Mobile Mount (^ecify modell ,>.->>... - 13,95 

DC Power cord (245,225,21 1J w/l use . ,.,, 3,00 

Power cord (specify model AC or DO J , 2,00 

Rower connector (spedfy mo<teiy .._.,*,.,*, .50 

Reverse dial (22A,30A,22S) ...,Z00 

SPinPlufl ZOO 

900 mAh Batteries & Charger for 202, 215, S02 49.95 

24 Pin Plu§ _. ,„. 3.00 

24 Pin Sei w/Brscket (22S) 6,00 






o ^ r\ n^r^-f^ 



k brUlwtt jwm 2 mrtir t ransc rii q 

ftttht^tT) tn-fkmjjvtivptiTiiring 

ft-^iitni' ind ciiriH-fikTiiX' 

KLM MULTi 2700 - S756.00 

^Svf^t^Mizrw «nd VFO. 
*Ailm<Mivi: NBFI^, WBFM^ AM, 
SSa w/USB/LSB arnl CW. 

3 Knob, GOO ciH)nn«lt, 10 I1H2 wtvp* 
*VXO, plu« or mbvus 7 ktU. 

• Standird GOO bHr tpiitiptus . . . 
•Two ''eddtomr Mit^. 

* OSCAR iriyi«c«ivii 2 tQ 10 mslBr cverati^iri 

• OSCAR r*cai«*r built-in. 
*CQnft»Cltir» 941 rnaf for sflEwirBTe 3 

mfltcf *na tO (imatat feini«rtnai. 

• BuHt'in vFO (continuoun Kumf^ijia^ 
144 t4S (WlHr In 1^ MHz Mgmamc. 1 
kHi iwadfiuti, 

4*8 pQt* SSa tUi*r plui two FM 

• 100 kH# crvltaJ HillfcrAior, 
4iV9ic> oparatad ralay I VOX I or 
P'l-%. 

A Audio tp*Kh comprauion« 
^ IVIoit* b^«nk«r, 

• fllT^ plui or mtnu* 5 kHi* 

• l^owrir CMJt/"S" nwtsr. 

• fm cfldTsf da Vint I on mflt«r. 

• lOVV rnlrvimuiTi ciutput power. NO 
TUNiNQI 

^Biuilt-in AC/OC powor tuppiy. 

• Ocsublfl convirt^on receivef. 16.9 
MHi und aB5 kHi I Ft. 

• niicuiwr ■uni'illivitV- 

Ff^: a,&pV for 2a dS S/N, 
SSB/CW; 0.2&^ for 14 dB S/M. 
Aiyt: S^V tuf lOtlH S/tM. 
^c^irit: Inebai: 5K, 14,3SW. 120, 

• Wtiglii' 7B[h». (13 KG), 



iorsen Kiilfod' 
Antefincis 

• ^m*« full 200 Mtts • low-low VSmJU. 

• D^irw 3 cfB 0iin in4 mdv*! 

*PTdc tha orM tihat bast till yeuf naadK 

MAGNETIC MOUNT 
stays put even at 
lOOmph! 

MMJM'150for 144 MH?yse^ 
MM JM 220 lor 220 MKi use 
MM-jM-'440 tor 440 MHz us0 




Only 

$38.50 
csomplete 



TRUNK LID MOUNT 

No holes and low 
silhouette too! 



^ 



J 



Only 
$38.50 

completi 



TLM-JM 150fof T44 MHz uSe^ 
TLM JM 220 tor 220 MHz u^e 
TLM-JM-440 for 440 MH^ use. 

And 1/4 wave antenna for trunk 
and magnetic mount — SI 8.50 

ROOF or FENDER MOUNT 

Glides on quick and easy 

in 3/8^* or 3/4" with 

fewest pa its. 

JM 150 K tor 144 MH^ use 

JM-22D-KfOr2aOMH2use 

JM-440'Kfor440MHzuse 

And 1/4 wave antenna for roof and 
fender mounts Si 1 .50 

Above snt€f\nm sff comptt^tff wittt 
mounting hardware, coirx^ conn&ctof piugi^ 
sffen v^mnch ^i^d complete tnitructiant. 




Only 

S31.S0 
complete 



FULLY AiR tRSTED — 
THOUSANDS ALREADY 
_^ IN USE 

#16 40% Coppi^r W«ld 
wir«' annealed in it hmndlfs 
like soft Coppvr wijf -^ 
Rated toT better than full 
leEid pow«r AM/CW ot 
SSB*Cq%xM or Balanced 
&0 ia 75 ohm l««dUne — 
VSWR undff 1. 5 l<y I at 
nti»t htifliti — Stajnless 
Steel luu'dwaFc — Drop 
Froof tniutatDii — Teniije 
Ferformjuice — No cotU or 
traps to break down or 
change und«r weallicr con- 
ditions — Completdy 
Atacmblecj! tcadv to put ut> 
— Oujkranieed I year — 
ONE DESIGN DOES IT 
ALL. 



([MPgcmND 




4e:»HD 

00-40 HD- 
75^0 HO 
TS-40 HD ESP1 
Tfr20HCl 
75^10 HO 1^1 
TSihIOHD 
75^10 HD CSP^ 

eeiQHD 



BANDS PfllCE WEIGHT 

tIMvmli IQf/Kfi 

40-70 U9^ 3f/ 73 

401^/15/10 »50 XfMt\ 

80/40^ 1& 57 QO 4«n 1$ 

7S/*0 5? SO 40ft II 

l^meTO m^ 44/133 

7&«}r*2a/1fn0 74 so 4ef1.34 

7S/4||Q0n5'10 74 SO 4B/t 34 

eO/4D^QO^ t &/ 1 FE SO SO/ 1 40 



LENGTH 
IFi/Hiit) 

36/ 10.9 
«»?10 
08/301 
tfi/Xil 
Ofi/Wl 
M^l 
fi&r?0 1 

iV3ia 



WO TRAPS ^ NO COILS - NO STUBS - NO CAPACtTORS 

MO R GAIN HD 0»POLES . . . •Orie half ttie length of conventlonel 
half-wave dipoitt, * MultlHband. Multi-frs^^uency, * Maximum mHh 
clency — no trapt, loading coils, or stubs. 9 Fully as&emblad a Ad 
pre- tuned — no maesurinci, no cutting. •All weather rated — 1 KW AM^ 
23 KW CW or PEP SSB. • Proven performance - more ^an 15,000 
have been dalivered. • Permit use of the full capabilities of loday'i 
&^and xcvrs, • One feedline for operation on all bendt^ • Low^e«t 
cott/benefit antenna on the market today- •Fast QSY — no foedlina 
twitching. • Higheit performance for the Novice » well ss th* 
EJttra-Cless Op^ 



EXCLUSIVE 66 FOOT, 75 7H/f|/ 









NEW 

lip MmmHwr Antmnmm Tmnmr 

Continuous taning 1,S=30 MHz 

forward reading relative output 

pouver meter 

300 watt power eapabilitv 

Buitt-in encapsulated balun 

Mobile mounting bracket 

C&ramic Rotary Switch 12-posi' 

tion 

Capacitor spacing 1 000 volts 

Tapped toroid inductor 

Antenna jnputs^: 

a. Co*ix unbaianced S0239 

b. Random wire 

c. Balanco<J feedUne 75— 660 
Ohm 

S%'* w. X 234" h. X 6" d. 

All metal black wrinkle finish 

cabinet 

/Vaig^t: 214 pourtdt 



Ihn^6n- 



BW 




i watts 



annccuit: 

km: 



full £cale low power 








Atfisd f4iriiMird 
And refisct^d 
wottM at ihm 
satti« tlrrttf 



READ FORWARD AND RE- 
FLECT EO WATTS AT THE 
SAME TIME, Tired of constant 
switching and guesswork? Every 
serious ham knows he must read 
both forward and reverse wattage 
stmu^tanaously for that perfect 
match. So upgrade with the Den- 
Tron W-2 Dual lO line Wattmeter . 



/1PLIFIERS 

.A-2500 Amplifier (with Bui It- 
Power Supply) SS99.50 

_A 1200 Amplifier . . , . 399,50 
M200 / AC Power Supply *or 

,A 1200 159.50 

M200 / DC Power Supply for 

,A-1200 ,..,,,.,.... 199.50 

NERS 

-3000 A Tuner i ,», . . , 349.50 

.2000A Tuner 199.60 

MOAT Super Tuner . . 129,50 

Monitor Tuner ».<,».., 79.50 

UENNAS 

IM Mobiie Antenna "Mobile 

J Bander'' (160 meters) . 59.50 

Iter Feed AM Band Doubtet 

te n n a * > « « » * , « . . 2*r * 5U 

cessories 

Dummy witJh coolant . . 29.50 

* Wattmeter - 99,50 

I XV Transverter "Top 

ider" 249.50 



lei 333 dummy loao wait- 
er — Favorite Lightw^eight 
:able-2&0 WATT RATING - 
Cooled, Ideal field service unit 
mobile 2- way radio — CB, 
ine, business band. Best for 
* amateur use, CB, with zero 



Power - 1000 WATT 
ING — Oil Cooled — model 
^ dummy load wattmeter, 
most popular combination 
Handles full amateur power. 
r ranges individuaOy cali- 
d. Can be panel mounted. 

tk. i.«H *«! IJl 1 W 23Q MHl 

WMnkn«i>|hi* tfnAiii 

rnifiliinum Fipal l>>>^it. 
«4wMr ll*nvn;JJ- tO^tt tOQ, 0-300. 0- lOOa 




SPECIFICATIONS: 

• power handling capability in ox- 
cess of 3 KW PEP 

• Front Panel Antenna Switch 
with 5 Antenna Inputs plus 
Tuner bypass position 

• Built-in 50 Ohm ^ 250 Watt 
dummy load 

• Dual Wattmeters 

• Compact: SV*" x 14" x ^4*\ 18 
pounds 

• Continuous Tuning 160-10 me- 
ters 

• 3 Core Heavy Duty Balun 



160 XV MARS Dual 

Band .,.,..*.... 279, 50 

1 00 ft. 2kw 300 Transmission 

Line . 19.50 

100 ft, 470 Ohm Ladder 

Line ...,...»..*►* 1 2,00 

1 Kilowatt Baluri 4:1 Chassis 

3 Kilowatt Balun 4:1 Chassis 

Ml ..,ii*4...-i ■♦* 23*wJ 




Model 374 dummy load watt- 
meter — Top of the Line - 1500 
WATT RATING — Oil Cooted. 
Our hlghast power combination 
unit. Rated to 1500 watts input 
(intermittent). Meter rartges are 
individually calibrated for hlgh^sst 
accuracy. 

VSVtfi i-^t mmk 1 J I m 330 UHt 

*m,-.r nijig<i tfioe wfam OC *n MJ i - iii T w w -t- 

mam it^^nftn ^im*T limn 
WATinwIw nairt^t:0 I &. V-Wf. 4?0Q, 4 1 M9 

InpiiT CeniwetOti SO 'JM (tutwiTleillv wiWl 




Wide rar>ge attenuator — Mod^ 
371-1. Seven rocker switches pro- 
vide attenuation from 1 dB to 61 
dB in 1-dB stops. Switches are 
marked in dB, 1 -2-3-5-1 0- 20-20. 
Sum of actuated switches (IN 
pfi^jtron} gives attenuation. Witf^ 
all switches in OUT position, 
there Is NO insertion loss. Atten- 
uator installs in coaxial line ustng 
UHF connectors. 



tmojm, OC: te 32» MtU 



VSWW 1-3 1 in« 

D. 1 fiSJd ^ to, !|, d ■_ D C 1i» t CO MHl 




THE MLA'2500 SPECIFICA- 
TIONS 

• 160 thru 10 meters 

• 2000+ watts PEP input on SSB 

• 1000 watts DC input on CW, 
RTTV, or SSTV Continuous 
Duty 

• variable forced air cooling 
system 

• sielf-contained continuous duty 
power supply 

• Two El MAC 8875 extemal- 
afiode ceramic/metal triodes 
operating in grounded ©rid. 

• Covers MARS frequencies with- 
out modificatJons 

• Harmonic Suppressiori better 
than 50 dB 

• Built-tn ALC 
•Built in RF Wattmeter 

• 1 1 7V or 234 V AC 50-60 Hz 

• Third order distortion down at 
least 30 dB 

• Frequency Ranget 1,8 MHz 
(1.8^2.5) 3.5 MHz (3.4^4.6) 7 
MHz {6.0-9. OJ 1 4 MHz 
(11.0-16.0) 21 MHz (16.0-2Z01 
2a MHz (28.0 30.0) 

• 40 watts drive for 1 KW DC 
input 

• Rack mounting kit available 
(standard 19" rack) 

• size: 5^^" H X 14" W « 14" D 

• Weight: 47 lb*. 




Model 331 A transistor dip meter 
— Portable RF single generator, 
signal monitor^ or absorption 
wavemeter. Lightweight (1 
pound^ € ounces with all coils)^ 
battery-powered unit Is ideal for 
field use in testing transceivers^ 
tuning antennas, etc:. Can also be 
used to measure capacity^ Induc- 
tance, circuit Q, and other fac- 
tors. Indispensable for experi- 
menters, It is easily the most 
versatile instrument in thB shop. 
Continuous coverage from 2 MHz 
to 230 MHz in seven ranges^ 



f^rvquttncr CUvW-Afi* 


i 3 VlHi m 230 MHI IP 7 BiriH lappirttt 






rjntanthV pJufl-l'n i'Pti ^iM'niljIhDi: 






3MHt JWHX4 MHi. HMHr, 












,ActtWff > 




|1jDUHi~33ai|lifr«9 


Uod^^tidH; 




iWC «f, ?B% W «K. 


Wtratm- 






aiJri' 




r" jf ^%" a 3h" 


fthipplfifl Wa 


uni 


1 lb.. 6 IMP 


PfU^r*: 




»»30.(W 




VAWfi: 



fiAii'V-- 



Coaxial antenna changeover relay^ 
Model 377* 

tOan-i^^ CW rTlCBO -4Tn iSBI 

tmtt m^fm 1 19, 1, SC V liOHOfC 

1 ib. 



PirrtmGlfitll' 
S»ilpfHrT^M«ltfht:: 




[a tell *V0ry thing f r^m Ifro to 10 
with thm nmw l^-io MAT 




MEW: The Monitor Tuner was 
designed because of overwhelm ing 
demand. Hams told us they 
wanted a 3 kilowatt tuner with a 
built-in wattmeter, a front pane? 
antenna selector for coax^ bal- 
anced tine and random wrre. So 
we engineered the 160-tOm Moni- 
tor Tuner. It's a lifetime invest- 
ment at S299.50. 




Mmet the 
SuperTuner 



MEET THE SUPER TUNER 
160-10 AT. The DenTron Super 
Tuner tun« everything from 
160^10 meters. Whether you have 
balanced line, coax cable, random 
or long wire, tha Super Tuner will 
match the antenna impedance to 
your transmitter. All DenTron 
tuners ^ive you maximum power 
transfer from your transmitter to 
your antenna, and isn't that 
where it really counts? 
1 KW MODEL 3129,50: 3 KW 
MODEL S229. 50. 




Model 372 CLIPREAMP. Get 

maximum l^al modulation with- 
out danger of splatter. 

Input ii^fntdanc* 1 0(1,000 ah nn>« 

OuHiitfi L ff i ii io if»HfHna 

Sii»: JU" H 1" It 4^>" 

Writm e^.; 




Universal hybrid coupler H phone 
patch. Model 3002W and model 
3O01W. The hybrid circuit pro 
vides iof effortless VOK opern 
tion of the phone patch. A built- 
in Compreamp speech preampli- 
fier/limiter (in Model 30O2WJ 
increases th# level of weak phone 
signals and also prevents overmod- 
ulation when the Jocal telephone 
is used as the station microphone, 
CThe Compreamp also functions 
as a praamplifier/limiter with the 
station microphone, if desired.) 

Model 300 2W with Compreamp 
$125.00 

Model 300 1W without Com- 
preamp S85,0O 



Model 359. IncrejBse your trans- 
mitter's effective speech power up 
to four times. This two stage, 
transistorized Audio Preamplifiary 
Li miter can be used with all types 
of transmitters. 



BorfSH ^Ui) in ^tqu'ivartriT 



iTVDb irafn 




UlM 


aca o^ifit, 


l^^^^-nw 


4 'ohrrifr 


l^kftKihgiM 


High IrtitMchini:* rBD.QOP ohrtuj 




[irviul di {tynwrue 


Ta(B pi«Tt#d«* 


ddh^f* 


Ttm^tfrmfjm 


V.adD«*iiw 


n^»rw S(K>*.*>- 4 ahum 


Tap* n^ip jw 


a r(H|0^n* 


S-iw 


iftK" ■ »*-" ■ 1" 


StliPP^H Wmt^M 


IH ttN. 


fv*ii 


fl vult tt^tury, HUfB"ti3tJt 




Or ttttulViilpnt 


CafiFwcun 


fftorm 




2-meter mobile AT- 200 An- 
tenna Matcher. Use your cars 
AM/FM antenna for your 2-meter 
mobile rig. Tunes from the front 
panel for max, output, min* 
VSWR (1.2:1 or less for most car 
antennas). S24.95 





Tufts Radio Etectronics ' 

TC-1 6 



(SI 7} 395 8280 







JMR 

ytlOBIL-MR^ 



$69.95 

Tm^^mf-nmo hm 6mm \ «ith waptkm fidvflty 

p«irTvhttM {flJk cwitch. 

FOR BROADCAST'QUALTTY TRANS- 
MISSEON AND REtKi'TION FOR BOTH 
MOBILE UNITS AKD BASE STATIONS. 

• Bo<Offiuiount#d *l«tjr*i-e4p«iritcir nurro- 
photte dcUv^ri Atudio-quality^ undlitorlvd 
voice repraducUon, Varinbli? giih canlrot 
l*t» you adjuil for QpUmum nuaduktlDn. 

*CuifaioiieiJ r«ieup Irti yov ixionJtor in 
pri^vaicy - no ipeaker blare to diiturb 
othen. Bloelu out enviFanmertiiil noU^t, 
too. Mndr of urbreiikabk ABS pljutic, 

4 H^^dbnnd leLr-tdjunts for eomrort^ble 
wf'ar OWT lonf houn. Sprtng-rirx hin|f 
l^b you slip htjkjiiwt on and off wilii 
fiut on« liaiid. R«v»rf ihi« for right or bft 

tar. 

■ H^adfivt csJii be hung on d under d micTo- 
phone clip. 

* Compact pilm h«ld lalli twiieh l«ti ydtt 
keep 6'u^A httnds on the whe«t for tiftr 
drivinif, Made of unbreakable ABS plulic. 

• Built, in FET LraniiiKitor amplifii't adapt! 
thifrropbone otiiput to Aolj Iranscpjwr 
itnpedjinct, 

* CbinpftLible vrith mfist two-way Tadioa m- 
eluding 40H;h»nnfll CB unitt. 

■ BuUl-m Velciro pad for «aiy mounting of 
Ihe talk switch. 

»M«dem US A 

SPECIFiCATiaNS 

Earphone impedance 

and type: S ohmt, dynamic 

Microphone LyfW KlrCtrel tapacitor 

Microphone frriiurncjr 

retpojuci 200-tiOClO ftx 

Amp ti Her type T FET Iran ttitor, 
variable Bain 

HAiiipLifit'r baturry T-^tAt MaJ3oiy 
power: TR-17S 

8wttirhmf ' Relay or electron U: 

IDEAL FOR EVEHY TWO-WAY RADtO 
COMMUNICATIONS NEFD . 

CB dpcraton * Amaietir radio pperaton * 
Po»k* and Tit* irehicl^n • Ambu lancet and 
rmerifncy vrhicI'M « TaMii and iruckert • 
Marini? pjeaiure and \rorlt boaU * Con 
nLmction and demolition nfewg • Induttri- 
fil cammunicdtioni * Security patroli ^ 
AirpofL towvf and fround crew* • Re- 
mote broadest and TV^ camett emw^ • 
FoTTaierK and Ttre^ watch tuuis • 



ii 



IDLAND 




13-513 220 MHz FM Transceiver 
— 12 vdc* Ttirae position power 
lelecior for 20, 10 or 2 watts 
OUtpuL PLL synthesized. lOQO 
frequencies between 220.00 and 
225.00 MHz m 10 KHz steps wiih 
a 5 KHz shfft-up. 4 offsets, ±1.6 
MHz supplied, 2 optional. 
£499.95 




13^500 2m FM Xcwr. ISW. 12 ch 
w/16/76, 34/M, M/94, mic, & 

mt. $169.95 




13-509 220 MHz FM Xcvr. 
12 ch, w/223,S0 MHz, n^ic. 
$159.95 



10W 
& mt. 




il 






The Bencher Ultimate Paddte . . . 
B dual tever, iambic keyer paddle 
that will increase your speed, 
accuracy Bt operating comfort 

♦ ADJUSTABLE CONTACT 
POINT SPACING - Precition 
screw adj.ustmefits on each set of 
contacts m^ke exact settings easy. 
Contact posts are split and locked 
by Sdt screws, eltminating the 
need for loeknuts. 

♦ wide range of TENSION 
ADJUSTMENT - Tension on fin- 
ger knobs is maintained by a long 
expansion spring^ Dual screw ad- 
justments adjust spring tension to 
match your "fist." 

• self adjusting needle 

BEARINGS- Keying shafts pivot 
in nylon bearings that "float" on 
machined brass fjttings. Spring 
tension prevents free play and 
slop; eliminates contact bounce 
and bacMash. 

• solid silver contact 

POINTS — The contact points are 
solid silver for a Ufetime of flaw- 
less keying. 

• PRECISiON-MACNlNED COM- 
PONENTS — Main frame, contact 
posts, spring post and bearing ring 
are all machined from solid bra^ 
. , . polished end chrome plated 
for durability end rich appear- 
ance. The Bencher Paddle looks st 
good 3S it worksl 

• heavy STEEL BASE; NON- 
SKID FEET - Finished in an 
attractive Mack wrinkle finish 
(chrome plating optional), the 
base measures 9.5cm x 1 0.2cm x 
l*3cm thick. It weighs 1 kilogram, 
and with its non-skid rubber feet 
is as solid a^ a rock. 

Model BV-I Standard Black Base 
^ . . $39.95, Model BY- 2 Potished 
Chrome Base . . , $49,95, 

BencHeR.inc. 





PP2 

M t«rie« is for mounting to sur 
faces inaccessible from the rear 
(walls, mobiles, systenriB interface, 
panels, test equipment). K series 
is seif- con tamed with a relay 
inside the encoder. When keys are 
pretsed contact closer occurs with 
a 2 sec. delay (adjustable). Con- 
tacts are rated at 110 mA @i 28 
volts switched^ 500 mA carry. 
PP-2K contains delay exclusion 
for the fourth column. However, 
by jumping D-5, 4th column is 
restored^ Unit Is operable from 
4.5-60 volts at lempgraitures from 
0°-l40^ F^ Output level will drive 
any transmitter or system. Adjust- 
ab e output level is controlled 
with an extremely steble muJii 
turn trimpot, w/ ace ess from the 
front of ths encoder (not behind), 
Savirig time for level setting, 
which amounts to hours when 
involved w/a system. 
PP 1 $55 {12 keys), PP-1 m SS5 
(lettering optional add $1} PP~1 K 
$66; PP2 $58; PP-2m $58 (let 
terina optional add $1): PP-2K 
$69 PPT A $6B (for standard 
::omrn hand-held). 



*p ipo Sgommunicat ions 



MICROWAVE MODULES 
TEXAS RF 



itit 



M M xf U M 



Ml CHOW AVE MDaUL,Ai 
HID+f PEHf OHMANCt UNtTl 
iron t44, 433 md t JM HHi 

jA* MHZ uasiitT oat* 

Wilfi ftu.ri pfuHctDd (iaia >^u4ta1 
Hf Amfllltiw fend Ml it* atmfm 
Lnpui lrfe£|Utf<icv. 144.14G MHif 
I.F. OMtPulfiiqufefKV 2t^D UHi 

ft^Md ^rrm.||fe pafKnon C^ id4 

^V*tm OKiilaKif trfeQjjfenc^ ' 1 ft iMHi t«tnte 

UafliFnumfraf)u*ncv nrrfl* fel I** MMi J iCMI 

PqwMt r pq mrfem«rtTl.' 11 ^#Olf» OC -2B1% il 50 fnA 

□thar ll,F, ^i^i|i,j| tr «M liwiCiinifMlllMtilfe : 

12 14. 14-je. ID^Q. Z4..a6MHi 



144 tlHl MOSrtT tiBH' 
vENTf A - MMC 144i7a LO 

^nki r^Bii'M^ Ml Kiiiiiioei«j HC 

MHf ttMlfw fem^tifi*!' jt) prvvKf* fe 

IO€it aicaJ^iAr i^gm^ iHJ|iatilii Igr 

1-U IdHZ DOuiBl.E COhV'ill- 
SfOH MID^FfT CamViHTfH ^ 

rr»«t |tiB wmtii^ifamitnt fOr ■ tiff* 
wivr iLilT»tjl« tot uup wiih r^ 
coivprt Kiniiiu baitif ^mlnrmmmm 

LF. Dwmwt irmst^^^m «Hflii«w» 2-*. *4 Mib 

0«Bkfetar fiHimnv 71 tfiH« 1^4 MM 1 1 R. 

TOuKt 14^ MMi ifi 

Vlfeainkwrn |f*qu«rre.^ «tTor at 144 1UMj 3 tUif 

TwplMli'Bfeifl. 30 d9 

■jLrttfetltfetd rftaiibrtium nali* ftiLLfi: ;,&dtE 

tM I4HZ DUAL ovm/r uos- 

FET PftI AVP(.iri£<l - 
MUAlM 

f.w M*i ma •«p*raH» l-iolriw] ant 
puU^ let l4»i$iriir tw^ TcolvM-i, fui 
■Afenilflfe. 

Irvu I tf eqtf ttw ■• 1 ^ l4e M M j 

Tnriul lain lAdfil 

GwWfenMKl frkfeifPuvn Uaam fwffirm: %^ 4fi 



43/ MHZ MOSPiT O0*4- 
VEAT^n - MMC433/9 44 
Twq nF Armtillftferi pnd * WoitH 
Mta* cflrn43JO" Hlfh HfllNVlTV 

9B^ 4i»«« W)«tme#ij|gcj.ti^ charpc- 

l^pvl ^aQiMnet . Alt j3a V Hj 
L'T. QiFipwi if^ipitffcl^ BialltfMfe 

i4-ii. tu-yii, 3»^ 144 146 

MHJ 

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Qmfwitvwt rnfefejniurn' fMi]M llRbtii: 3.S dfl 

Ovtitf QKkjjAlv fT*(|aant:v iKJl MHr 4ZR.^ MM^ if) 

If VMT cvnif ttUHtl «£ VHf 4144 T4i MHJ^ IF) 
U*Biinit^fnlir*04MIVf irror >l432 MHj 5AH| 

ft) ■ ■ rwy ^w wunro 1 2 ^ett% DC ^^33r^ «f 4S f*iA 



1:44-144 MHr 



13M MHi caihtUEftTEn - 
MUC 1^^311 - MMCl3aQ/l44 

A h-ytH-lfl rlni ml"* i*ilh ■ 
mptcl^'^ ufe)p of hei^j*rrl« 
■fiocifei,. <fel'44ni ■ duii'tai* «mHhM 
L.f wTvriltlv. 
Irpirt triqy pjiy . lAi-iaVVMHr 

TvpMst ipin 3Sd9 

QuwMiimd '•^fejiiniufin nc^iiM <<|Kirw: (Lb tfH 

Crviul ouiUfeTDr lrH|Lifenc<r: lOELGBfl UNz iJW30t*Hiw iWi 

ItVfiarcjdflt'OllVdS M MH» O^ 140 MHj! |P ^ 
MpalmumfrHiMffiev otrtiTpl 1 39& MH»: ^O bHi 
^i;m^ rBQUj < a mt * H i l£ vOitt DC i?fi^% at ^ mi^ 
a|. ^ a^wry WHC 



198.95 

198.95 
359.95 
253,95 
298,95 
H S+ 
. 55.95 
, 60.95 
, 65.00 
, 65.00 
. 71.95 
, 71,95 



i « • ■ -p 



THANSVERTEHS: 
MMT 144/28 . . . , 

MMT 144/50 

MMT432/2SS , _ 

MMT 432/50S 

MMT 432/1 44S 

RECEIVING CONVERTE 

MMC 144/23 ... 

MMC 144/2SLO 

MMC432/23S , ,. 

MMC 432/144 . . 

MMC 1296/28 

MMC 1296/144 , . 

VARACTOR TIPLER: 

MMV 1296 , 

ATTENUATORS: 



AMPHENOL 






- 81,50 



16.00 



TEE/AX J^ 



PutvEit Pwidwm 



NkMM SW SOOO 



TEE/AX 
Coax Toggle Switch — $39*95; 
Coax Relay Version — $55,95 
•All brass construction •Teflon 
insulated • Captivated internal 
contacts •available in UHF, BNC, 
N, E, B\t series. • 52 Ohm$ • 
SPDT OPDT ♦Power 1 KW 

TEEAXJNC. 



VG«10*« 




UQ-iia 



SERIES Jl - BNC COliWICTOlUr 
Amsthttnari ftS'C miawf hili Urn lau^ Ucbti^ IfttL 
« B>1hcirpf4'Ql rifUgrfpti with b«yoD4^ Krt»A iloi 
qoMirh duetMitoBet 4»pUISeiLi|ie]R^ 

^lieAA, ciQiUDdliK ftnia cod mal« cafiUctc fejn 
4cirurMEdr ina.fJi|jq«<| f^in brut, $t>iiUi us nUHlf tti 
^tylUwoL i»pti«r. All vmrta in Ima irt AJSl'AO 
pli,ir(|® la g^Vf you fOniHctori tlmt c:«& laie 

9-SC BULESEJkD SECIT- 
TAtUE 31 211-a«!l tJG'lO*4 
Mitri wilh amy BNC ptiit 

inter D*ii4}il Up to IfM*^ ui^ 

BNC (Ml TO unr iF> adaf- 

Adfeptj U3V BNC ^kIi lo uir 

P<HrHLE HATi ADAiTCA 

^a^f 7-3lia Bath CDupUnp 

nitu 4i« tt*^ tunyni. C^M- 

JACK Al>rATES tl.Sfl 
»t»-E01-3A» A^«ptl 
B3-1SP'3tt» tfi» MptoTolc iTpc 
4Ls^lo mtrfinft JAch or pen Ja^N. 
rAMEL RE.CePTACLE 

wilh 4 fMlepftn in 31/32" 

fANEL RCCBPTACLC 



BKC<rj TO UHF 4m ADAf, 
TF.R Sl'D7A-Ma Ufd^-aT^ 
Adjkpt* Amy Bsr plug tu mbtf 

If II SH -ON 

A3-:;^SF^3ib Ffl4tufct Ml us* 
thr^^ded!. ftiriiitr ih«ll lopiufa 
hi on ftnMlt ci^nnvcXoo- 




llCa*tti 



LtGHTNI^fG ARREitTOM 
!it&-10S'3i5 EUmlTiAlii^i Hatir 
l^uild-tlt) fron] fenl«nnfe. Pro 
IfCU yCHit vkluiblr tquiprntnt 
ilAiiLKl ll^mmt danucc 
t4 110 

BNC rLUG ji^ooi-3a« u& 

AH Cantm<init u»rd ft^i roin- 
munifTMlloni fe,[kt^nni IcAd 
cmhlte^ Vtfi HO ^btU tt RG 

BNX STRAIGHT AjJAJTEil 
a I 319-343 fO-fll4 1, 9j'3J" 

bP iflUM^ UMimm with ENC 

plugi-f^.lZ 

BHC rA^rEL RECtfrACLE 

i;,>0«9,3a^ tlC-390 M<]Luili 



IMITB^M^ S039#SH M«UBtt 
Ln Kfntl* ilf32" dlmnciiT 
ticilf. Knurled lock nitu im- 
trirni lumirkf. SI.!! 9 
BNC AN01.C ADArrEk 

AHV BKC |»lii4l: tot ri^t cniV 
l4iV- H.li 

BNC TRe AtJAPTEK 
&mM3A-lBft i:r4ii-aT4 A44ptM 3 
ANC piuft ta ^14>03-3I& of 
alkEX frmhie BNC tTP* rvccp* 




CG4t4 



1?^ 



tie^vi 



^^QSjb 



BOStMH 



<f 



U' 



rS^ 



U<i^t4 



PL-259 . . . 90^ UG-175 (Adap 
for RG B8U) . . . iSd 




Model M-1S 

Nemarc Auto Console Model h 
•universal mount tor CB i 

amateur r^dio!^, tape play 

AM Si FM tuners, & scannerf 
•Scyiptured design for "ori9 

equipment" look. 
•Low profile for non-slip moi 

ing; 13^1/Z' x 10-1/2'* x S-S 

• Easy-to-inrtall & remove 
theft protection. 

• Tough unbreekable copo^y 
with rich brown textured fir 

• Integral cup holder and * 
ray, 

•$14,95 

Auto Console Model M-IS: Sg 

features as above model PLUiE 

• specially desiuned 3"' x 5*' 
speaker for voice commuj 
tfon. Frequency response: 
hz— 7 Khz, voice coil: 9i 
diametoT. 

• $19.95 



trrjarc 



Tufts Radio Electronic* • iei7} 335 8280 

TC-17 




ARGONAUT, MODEL 509 

Covers all Amateur bands 
TO-SQ meters. 9 MH^ crystal fil- 
ter. 2.5 kHz bandwidth. 1\7 shape 
factor @ 6/50 dB points. Power 
required 12^15 V DC <^ 150 mA 
receive^ 800 m A transmit at rated 
output. Construction atumlnum 
chassis, top and front panel, 
molded ptastic end panels. Cxeam 
front panel, walnut vinyl top and 
end trim. Size HWD 4'/^" x 13'^x 
7". Weight 6 Jbs. 

LINEAR AMPLIFIER, MODEL 
405 

Covers all Amateur bands 
10-80 meters, 50 watts output 
power, continuous sme wave. RF 
iwattmeter SWR meter. Power re- 
quired 12-15 VDC @ 8 A, max. 
ConstructJon: aluminum chassis, 
top and front panel, molded 
plastic side panels. Cream front 
oan^l, walnut vinyl top and end 



TRITOhf IV Digitaf Modef 544 
The new ultra-modern fuily solid- 
state TRITON makes operating 
easier and a lot more fun, without 
the ttmitations of vacuum tubes* 
For one thing^ you can change 
bands wUh the flick of a switch 
and no danger of off-reso nance 
damage. And no deterioration of 
performance with age* But that's 
not all. A superlative 8-pole i-f 
filter and less than 2% audio 
distortion, transmitting and re- 
ceiving, makes it the smoothest 
and cleanest signal on the air. The 
TRITON IV specifications are 
impeccable. For selectivity, sta- 
bility and receiver sensitivity. And 
it has features such as full CW 
break- in, preselec table ALC, off- 
set tuning, separate AC power 
supply, 12 VDC operation, per- 
fectly shaped CW waveform, 
bujlt-(n SWR bridge and on and 
on. 




trim. Size^ HWD 4!4" x 
A^eight 2'A lbs. 



ftf 



X B' 



iRar 



N-TEC 



KR20-A ELECTRONIC KEYER 

A fine inftrument fo; aU-aiound hiah perfo;- 
itiancc £ lee: trci n.ir: k ikying. Pnddk' Ac1.Ua.E:ian 
force ia f ^.ctory adjusted for rythmic sTTic:>t]th 
keying. Con tact adjustments on front. 
W^ightin^ fartpr factory ^ct foi upliutxitn 
!itrLOOthne&£ Anti articulation. Ov«r-ride 
'^straight k«y^^ ctinvenientiy IfJcatud for 
emphiisi&H QRS sendmg or tune-up, Reed 
rela,y output- $i|3t'tftiie gtnerktor i^ith 

a-dnislable level, Sc]f-<:omptfltmg ^hsr^ Enters. 
Plus-in circuit board. For 117 VAC, 50-60 
Hk Or 6-14 VDC- Finished in cream and 
walnut vlnyL Price »63.50 

KR&-A ELECTRONIC KEYER 

Similar to Ka20-A but without side-tune 
oscillator nr AC power supply. Ideal for 
portable, mobiJe or fixed atatitJti. A great 
value that will give years of trovblefree 
service. Housed in an aU-raetive case with 
cream front, walnut vjnyj top- Fnr 6-14 
VPC op^ratiun.Pri^ $39.60 

KRl-A DKLUXi: DUAL PADDLE 

l^addle asscmfal^ is. that used in the KR50,, 
louji^d In an attractive formed aluminuirri 
;B9e. Price $35. DO 

KRZ'A SINGLE LEVER PADDLE 
For keyLnn conventional '^TO" or discrete 
^hajraoter keyers, as uised in the KR2G-A. 
Price $17.00 

KR&O ELECTRONIC KEYER 

A completely automatic electronic kcyer 
:tilly a4ji^!it.abie to your upei^aling iityle and 
preference, speed, touch and weithtin|., the 
ratio of the length of dits and dabs to the 
»pac? betwei^n Ihcm. S^-'lf-contralled Heyer 
.o transmit your thoughts clearly, articu- 
At&\v and almost effortl^s^- The jambie 



(squeeiie) feature allows the insertioTi of dits 
and dahs with perfect timing. 

[VI cm units f}rOv^c:|<;d iot botb diU 3n<3 
diihs but either may be defeated by switches 
on the rear panel. Thuj^ the KR&O may be 
operate^ as a fui] laTubic (squeeze) keyet* 
vi^ith a single memory or as a conventional 
type keyep, AH cliara ct**rs ari^ stK-complct- 
ini, Price *110.00 

SPECIFICATIONS 

Spfrcd Range; 6-60 w.p.rn. 

Weighting Itatiso Range ; 50% to 150% a( 

classical dit length. 

Memories: Dit an4 d^h, Irbdi visual def£at 

switches. 
Paddle Actuation Force; 6^0 gms. 
Power Source: UTVAC* &0-eO Hi, 6-14 

VDC. 
Finish^ Cream fronli wartQLLi vinyl top and 

side panel trim. 
Output: Reed relay. Contact rating 1& VA, 

400 V- max. 
Paddles: Trtrque drive with ball bearinii 

pi%'Ot. 
IJidv-tone; 54JO Hi tont. 
Adjustable output to 1 voltr 
Size HWD: 2W' x 5W x 8^'^ 
Weight: I^IU. 

KR50 





-IRST WITH SSB HF DIGITAL 
rUNING, IS ONLY THE S EG I N- 
MING OF WHAT THE AMA- 
FEUR GETS FROM THE CIR 
^STRO 200. 
Standard Features: 
Electronic Tuning / All Solid 
State / DigitaHy Synthesized / 
200 Watts PEP Input / Full RF 
entering / Dtgital Readout / Noise 
Blanker / Squelch / Variable 
Speech Processing /Full Metering 
' WWV Receiver / VOX / LSB^ 
JSB-CW 

Vhe heart of the ASTRO- 200 is 
:he frequency synthesizer. The 
atest in phase-lock- loop technol- 
ogy is incorporated to proi/lde thg 
3uilt-in versatility of all electronic 



tuning, crystal frequency stabiltty 
at each freQuency of operation, 
and over 40^000 HF channels 
displayed in tOO Hz mcrements 
. », ^50 Hz fine tuning for con- 
trnuous ham band coverage. 

Each circuit board is "baked- 
in" fqr over 100 hours prior to 
installation In the transceiver 
assembly. 

Discover th© ease and accuracy 
of electronic tuning. Calibrates all 
bands with WWV at the turn of a 
switch. Lowest frequency drift, 
with no VFO to calibrate. Only 
2.8" high x 9.5" wide x 12.3" 
deep. Ideal for mobile use or with 
accessories, provides complete 
fixed statfon operation. Price 
$995.00, 

Accessories AC Power supply 
$135.00. Speaker in cabinet 
$29,95, Station operating console 
with phone patch, 24 hr. digftal 
clock, speaker, 10 min. ttmer 
$29 5,0 0, Desk microphone 
$38,00. Mobile mount $12.00. 
Mobile mic $15.00. 400 Hz nar- 
row band CW filter $50.00. 




THiNgcRiunc 



206 

207 

208 

212 

213 

21 5P 

240 

241 

242 

244 

245 

249 

271 

272 

273 

276 

1102 

210 

210/E 

251 

251 /E 

252G 

2526/E 

262G 

262G/E 

405 
509 

540 
544 

570 
574 

670 

KR-1A 

KR-2A 

KR-5A 

KR-20A 

KR-50 



■■ I I 4 



$29.00 
. 14.00 
. 29.00 
. . 5.00 
. . 5,00 
. 29,50 
.97,00 
. 29.00 
169.00 
1 97.00 
. 25.00 
. 29.00 
, . 5.00 
. . 5.00 
. . 5.00 
. 29,00 
. . 1.00 



ACCESSORIES 

Crystal Cal ibratpr . .,..,,.,. 

Ammeter for Models 251 , 252G, 262G . . , 

CW Filter, for Model 509 , , 

Crystal, for Models 540, 544, 29.0-29.5 MHz ,< 
Crystal, for Models 540, 544, 29.5-30.0 MHz . . 

Microphone, Ceramic with plug , .. 

One-Sixty Converter, for Models 540, 544 

Crystal Oscillator, for Models 540, B44 

Remote VF O, for Models 540, 544 . _ 

Digital Readout/Counter, for Model 540 

CW Filter, for Models 540, 544 ._,, 

Noise Blanker, for Models 540, 544 

Crystal, for Model 570, 21.0-21.5 MHz 

Crystal, for Model 570, 28.0-28.5 MHz 
Crystal, for Model 570, 28.5-29.0 MHz . . , , 

Crystal Calibrator, for Model 570... 

Snap-Up Legs, per pair ,,......,. 

POWER SUPPLIES 

117 VAC, 13 VDC, T A,..,,...,,.. 

Same as Model 21 0, but 1 1 5/'230 VAC ..... 

117 VAC, 13 VDC,9 A .,.. 

Same as Model 2B1, but 115/230 VAC., ... 

117 VAC, 13 VDC, ISA ,,,^,. 

Same as Model 252G, but 1 T 5/230 vAc . . . 
Same as Model 252G, with VOX & speakers 
Same as Modei 26 2G, but 1 1 5/230 VAC . . . 
LINEARS AND TRAMSCEIV£RS 

Linear Amplifier. 100 W. 3,5-30 MHz 

Argonaut Transceiver, SSB/CW, 5 W, 3.5-30 

MHz ,.,..,,....*.. , , . 

Triton IV, SSB/CW, 200 W. 3.5-30 MHz , ,. 
Triton IV, Digital, SSB/CW, 200 W. 3.5-30 

MHz , 

Century/21 , CW, 70 W. 3.5-30 MHz 

Century 21 , Digital .........,..,,.,,,,..,, 

KEYERS 

Single Paddle, for Model 570 only 29.00 

Paddle Assembly, Dual 35.00 

Paddle Assembly, Single _. . 17,00 

Single Paddle Keyer, 6-1 4 VDC 39.50 

Single Paddle Keyer, 117 VAC/6-14 VDC 69,50 

Ultramatjc, Dual Paddle, 1 1 7 V AC/e-l 5 V DC .1 10.00 



. . . 30.00 
. . . 35.00 
... 85.00 
. . . 92.00 
. . 1 09.00 
.. 116.00 
..139,00 
.. 146.00 

..159.00 



..359.00 
. . 699.00 



..869.00 
, . 289,00 
, , 399.00 



THE SURPRISE CMFTHE CENTURY 




Century 21, the exciting 
70"watt, 5-band CW transceiver 
that surprised everyone with its 
super performance and (ow cost, 
has another surprise for you. A 
second model with digital readout 
(and a mod kit for those who 
wouJd like to convert their dial 
rT>odei). Both Models 570 and 574 
have the same unique circuitry 
that has won raves from everyone 
— both have the same fine fea- 
tures: 

• Direct Frequency Readout 
{Model 574:5 red LED digits, 



0.3"^ high, accurate to nearest 1 
kHz. Model 570: marked in 5 kHz 
increments fronr 0-500 kHz, MHz 
markings for each band displayed, 
tuning rate typically 17 kHz per 
tuning knob turn. 
•Full Break-In • Full Band 
Coverage on 3, 5, 7, 14, 21 MHz 
Bands, 1 MHz on 28 MHz Band • 
70 Watts Input • Total So lid- 
State • Receives SSB and CW • 
R«;eiver Sensitivity 1 fiV • In- 
stant Band Change, No Tune-up • 
Offset Receiver Tuning • 3- 
Position Selectivity • Adjustable 
Side tone Level * Linear Crystal- 
Mixed VFO • Overload Pro- 
tection • Built In AC Povtfer 
Supply •Black & Gray Styling • 
HWD: 6^1/Sr' X 12 1/2' x 12", 
15-1/2 lbs, • Matching Acces- 
sories 






f^^:^o 







WHEN QRM RAGES AND THE 
PILE^UPS DEEPEN, WOULDN'T 
YOU LIKE TO HAVE . . . 

• all the AOCK-CRUSHING 
POWER YOUR LICENSE 
ALLOWS — on all nnodes — 

• VNSTANT B ANDCHANGE 
'NO-TUNE^ UP' all the way 
from to through 80 meters, 
with .the escclusive ALPHA 374? 

• coverage ALL THE WAY 
DOWN TO 160 METERS with 
the smooth-tuning, extra-rugg&d 
ALPHA 76 powerhouse? 



' CRISP, PENETRATING 
"TALK POWER" - as much as 
to dB extra to 'punch through' 
when the going gets reaJly 
tough^ with the ALPHA/ 
VOMAX split band speech pro- 
cessor? 

THE PROTECTION OF A 
FACTORY WARRANTY 
THAT RUNS A FULL 18 
MONTHS — BIX times as long as 
competitive units? [ETC tries 
to build every ALPHA to last 
forever , . . and weVe making 
progress: not one single case of 
ALPHA 76, 77D, or 374 power 
transformer failure has ever 
been reported!] 



EHHHORN TfCHNOLOatCAl 0**EFi AKQHS: tUC 





Tufts Radio Electronics • (617) 395-8280 

TC18 







THE IMPROVED "ORIGINAL" 
V1BROPLEX. Suitable for All 
Cla&ses of TransmiiEtinf Work 
Where Speed and Perfect Morse 
Are Prjme E^^entiajs. This great 
new Vibroplex is a smooth and 
easy working BUG. It has won 
fame on land and sea for its 
clarity, precision and ease of 
rmanlpulation. Can be slowed 
down to 10 words per mrnute or 
leS5 or geared to as high rat© of 
speed as desired, Mam tains the 
same high quaiity signal at what- 
ever speedy insuring easy recep- 
tion under all conditions. Weight 
3 rbs, 8 oz. 

DeLuHe — Chromium base and 
top parts, with jeweled move- 
ment. $59.95 



: r!^^:*. 



:** 




THE ^'LIGHTNING BUG" 
VtBROPLEX \-\\qh Quality Sig- 
nals at All Speeds. Flat pendulum 
modeU Weight 3 lbs. 8 oz. Stan- 
dard — Polished Chromium top 
parts, grey base. $49.95 




THE -^CHAMPION" VtBRO- 
PLEX 

Weight 3 lbs. 8 oz. Without cFrcuit 
closer. Standard finish only. Chro- 
mium finished top parts, with 
grey crystal base, $46.50 




VIBRO-KEYER 

Over the years^ we have had many 

requests for Vibropiex parts to be 

used for construction of a keyfng 

mechanism for an electronic 

transmitting unit. This beautifui 

and most efficient "VI bro Keyer'' 

is ideal for this job. 

FEATURES OF THE "VIBRO- 

KEYER'' 

• Beautiful beige colored base, 
size Sy/' X 4y^", weight 2% 
pounds 

• Same large size contacts as fur- 
nished on Deluxe Vibroplex. 

• Same main frame and super 
finished parts as Deluxe Vibro- 
ptex 

•colorful red finger and thumb 
pieces, 

• Has the same smooth and easy 
operating Vibroplex trunion level 

• a real ^'Gem" ad)UBtableto suit 
your own "taste" 

Standard — $46,50: Deluxe Finish 
$58,50 



There's ■ 
nothing | 
like it ■ 




RADIO AMATEUR CALLBOOK 
— There's nothing like it! Foreign 
Radio Amateur CaHbook DX List- 
ings — $13.95; United States Call- 
book — All AaW Listings - 
$14,95. 




ISTYE VIKING SQUEEZE KEY 

Extra-long, finger- fitting molded paddles with 
adjustable spiing tension, adjustable contact 
spacing. Knife-edge bearings and extra large, 
gold plated silver contacts! Nickel plated brass 
haifdware and heavy, die cast base with 
non-skid feet. Base and dust cover black 
crackle finished, SSK-1 — $23.45, 
SSK-ICP has heavily chrome-plated lMse and 
dust cover. List price, $29.95, 

You get a sure, smooth^, Speed-X model 
310-001 tjfansmitting key, linear circuit osciUatoi: and amphfier, with a 
built-in 2" speaker, aU mounted on a heavy duty aluminum base with 
non-skid feet. Operates on standard 9V transi^or type battery (not 
included). List price, $18.50. 

PHONE PATCH Model No. 250-46-1 measures 6-1/2" wide, 2-1/4" 
high and 2-7 /S" deep. List price, $36.50. Model 250-46-S, designed for 
use with transceivers having a built-in speaker, has its own built-in 2" x' 
6'* 2 watt speaker. Measures 6-1/2" wide, 2-1/4'^ high and 2-7/8** deep. 
List price, $44. &0. 



No. SSK-1 %73.9^ 



CODE PRACTICE SET 



M«mA 












Kb. 114^(MH)3 - »4l$ 

Na. 114-312003 -Brm - &.» 




Ha. 114-310403 - ^JO 



NYE VIKING SPEED^X KEYS 
NYE VIKING Standard Speed-X keys feature smooth, adiustable 
bearings, heavy-duty silvei contacts^ and are mounted on a heavy 
o\'al die ca5t base with black wrinkle finish. Available with 
standard, or Navy knob* with^ or without switch, and with nickel 
or brass plated key arm and hardware. 

Pamper yourself with a Gold-Flated NYE VIKING KEY! 
Model No. 114-31C-004GP has ail the smooth action features of 
NYE Speed-X keys in a special ^* presentation" model, AH 
hardware is heavily gold plated and it is mounted on onyx-like jet 
black plastic sub 'base. List price is $50.00. 



Witetin Electimiics Ciorp. 



• M<?(i*lTA-33 

• Model TA 33, 3 elements, 10,1 
dB forward gaan (over isotropic 
source) - $206.50 

• Model TA'33 Jr., 3 elements, 
10.t dB forward gain {over iso- 
tropic source) — $151, 8& 

• Model MPK-3, 7500 Watts 
AM/CW and 2000 Watts P.E.P. 
SSB - $52.26 

• Mode J TA-36^ 6 elements — 
$335,25 

• AK™60 
$11,15 

• Model 
$232.50 

• Model 
$310,65 

• Model CL-203, 3 elements — 
$227.65 

• Model TA-40 KR — 40 meter 
conversion kit- $92.26 

• Signal-niaster antenna — 
$267.50 



n\ast plate adapter — 



CL-33, 
CL-36. 



3 elements — 



6 elements — 





* ||>di''i^ll tftmmtTf i)i* ja 

* jUI XW- plkJ| ML 

* Rulibcr rtcK .4n;te[Hip futmtihei 

' GunvrrilcrL^ip f ^b iM hip |y:«4ic1 

* 9(yOay W^rrancv 

■ flu ill. Fiji r nqgbd Lot 

■ EuJIy ■HHsitdcf'tKuitrv 

* (Wpilf xms rwfiisJiri wicti t»h rtrnti ifttuiKa 

NEW 2 METER MARK II AND 
MARK IV 

As the smallest size hand-helds 
ever marketed^ the radios feature 
excellent adiacent channel selec- 
tivity, and innermod/ima§e rejec- 
tion. The attractive blue-gray 
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Alben F. Lee, M,D. KH6HDM 
204 Makee Road 
Honolulu HI 9731 5 



Confessions Of 



A Vertical Fanatic 



careful, he's looking for converts 



The vertical antenna 
should be welt ap- 
preciated as a ham antenna, 



as it is truly a sleeper. This 
antenna is great for DX| Is 
compact and simple, and it 



can give a good accounting of 
itself even under less-than- 
tdeal conditions. 



As a demonstration, the 
"Quick 'N Easy 15 or 20 
Meter Vertical/* as described 
in 73 in February, 1974, is a 
fine starting point. For 15 
meters^ an ll-foot aluminum 
rod (or for 20 meters, a 
16-foot aluminum rod) is in- 
stalled by setting it in a pop 
bottle. Even as few as one or 
two isolated ra dials cut to the 
same length as the upright 
will surprise you with their 
performance. I dally worked 
KH6HGJ and KH6HHD from 
the San Francisco area with 
only TOO Watts and a 5 by 9 
report. This 20 meter rod was 
only two feet from the porch 
and the house, and the lop 
was steadied with a broom 
stick. 

All of this makes one 
wonder what I could have 
done if I had found a clear, 
open spot with a 360-degree 
ground system. This was not 
possible, but the makeshift 
setup worked. You can*t beat 
success. 

My next note on the ver- 
tical concerns the ground 
system. A little experimenta- 
tion will show that the 
ground radials which perform 
the best on receiving and 
transmitting are those which 
are elevated and insulated at 
the ends. With these same 
radials lying on or beneath 
the ground, the swr is elcr 
vated, and the receiving signal 
is less in volume. Following 
this, one can check four rods 
driven into the earth at 90 
degree angles, and here find 



V£WTtCAL UPHlSHT 




VERTICAL UPRIGHT 




E*flT+| 



»tt}\Al 



Fig. L Radial angle at vertical base to bring impedance to 50 

Ohms, 



Fig. 2 Tap method used to bring impedance to 50 Ohms on a 
vertical antenna. 



134 



the least-desired function. 
Lastly, trying with no radialsj 
as I have heard a few op- 
erators do, is nearly worth- 
less. Were I pressured into 
such a situation^ I would use 
the vertical as a long wire and 
use a ground with a long- wire 
tuner in the shack| which will 
do a good job. 

Recently I learned from 
George Onsum W7IC about 
his technique of using wound 
coils in his 75-80 meter 
radials, and Tvc tried it. It 
works. 

The vertical makes a grand 
showing as a mobile antenna 
for the auto, motor home, 
trailer, and particularly for 
marine work- Use of the verti- 
cal over salt water, using the 
water as ground, is a fine way 
to go. As a practical matter, 
the compact vertical is pretty 
close to the only antenna for 
such mobile and marine use. 

Another note on the 
advantages of the vertical 
might be made about the fact 
that the resonant frequency 
and impedance adjustments 



on such an antenna may be 
handily made from the 
ground without climbing 
towers. 

Some will say that the 
vertical is nondireclional and 
has less gain than a yagi. It is 
also true that a vertical will 
pick up a greater number of 
man-made noises from 
rotating machines, generators, 
motors, ignitions, and home 
appliances. 

Despite these factors, the 
vertical which is in the clear, 
free of buildings, trees, 
scrubs, and nearby metal 
obstructions, will, with a 
good ground, do a grand job. 

For instance, 1 visited a 
ham who had a vertical next 
to his house, completely 
hidden by an evergreen tree. 
He had neighbor probtems. 
His ground was the house 
water pipe. He worked locally 
and at great distances, and 
the neighbor is now quiet. 

Here in Hawaii, where 
seventy-five percent of the 
homes are on leased land, the 
ham antenna can be a prob- 



lem. The lawyers have written 
in every restriction known to 
man. In one ritzy neighbor- 
hood where no type of 
antenna is allowed, I talked 
to a chap who tipped over a 
commercial vertical in his 
attic with which he worked 
the world. 

Now, here's a note about 
impedance in the vertical. If 
Lhe radial system is brought 
off at 90 degrees from the 
base, the impedance will read 
from 25 to 30 Ohms. To 
bring this toa50-Ohm usable 
range, there are two easy 
methods to use* The first, as 
shown in Fig. 1, brings the 
radial ofr the upright al an 
angle and then straight out 
The second technique, as 
shown in Fig. 2, uses the tap 
method. This is used by com- 
mercial manufacturers, and is 
my preference. 

Another note on verticals 
is that the best technique for 
finding the resonant fre- 
quency and impedance is the 
grid-dip meter/antenna bridge 
setup. With good readings on 



these two instruments, the 
swrswill be low. In mobile 
situations, I use the svvr meter 
for adjustments* 

Verticals have been made 
with a large assortment of 
things. One can use water 
pipe, irrigation pipe, down- 
spout stock, beer cans, 
copper tubings coax, clothes- 
line poles, ham towers, alumi- 
num tubing, stainless steel 
tubing, and wire of every 
description. I recently was 
interested to read of a vertical 
made with an aluminum 
ladder. 

One afternoon last year, 
the strongest 20 meter signal 
on the band was a retired 
chap who phased two com- 
mercial verticals using the 
aiuminum skin of his trailer 
as ground. Here, in a final 
note on verticals, we open a 
whole new bag of worms. 

What notes do you 
have? ■ 

Reference 

1. Al Lee KH6HDM. "Quick 'N 
Easy 15 or 20 Meter Vertical." 
73, February, 1 974, pages 37-39. 



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135 



Jerrold Swank W8HXR 

657 Wiilabar Drive 

Washington Court House OH 43160 



Novice Guide 
To Phased Antennas 



part I 



An Indian once came 
into an automobile 
salesroom, the story goes, 
and asked about a car 
which drew his fancy. 

"Where do you put the 
horse?" he asked The 
salesman said that no 
horse was needed and pro- 
ceeded to give him a very 
complete explanation of 
how the internal combus- 
tion engine works. The In- 
dian listened closely and 
frequently nodded his 
head, so the salesman 



Cot. 1 



CoL2 
a/X = Q.25 



= 0" 



Row 2 



o ^O 



o 




Row 3 

a = 90° 





Row 4 





G 
Rows 

a =180° 





asked, "Now do you under- 
stand how the automobile 
works?'' "Yes/' replied the 
Indian, "but I still don't see 
where you put the horse.'' 

Then there is the little 
girl who was given a book 
to review for her school 
homework She wrote the 
following: "This book told 
me more about penguins 
than I cared to know;" 

This is the way I feel 
about most of the articles 
and books I have read on 
phased antennas. I just pur- 



Col. 3 Cot. 4 

afX == 0.37S a/X = 0,5 



Ci>l,S 
af\ = 0.625 


















chased a book on vertical 
antennas. It was a com- 
plete work on how to figure 
out the radiation angles 
and the various patterns 
and had page after page of 
higher mathematics It 
even suggested that it 
would be better to use a 
computer. 

Since I had no computer 
and only had a roll of wire 
and some tools, the book 
was a total loss. 

Actually, phasing anten- 
nas is extremely simple, if 



Col. 6 Col. 7 

a/X = 0.75 aA = 0,875 



Col. 8 
a/X =1.0 


















Fig. 1. Variations of patterns available with two towers. 



you only want to put up a 
pair of phased antennas 
which will give the max- 
imum results with a 
minimum of mathematics. 
If you don't care how phas- 
ing works, just ignore the 
drawings I have included. I 
felt that there would be a 
few who would like to 
know how it works without 
caring for anything more 
than a simple under- 
standing. I have also in- 
cluded a page of patterns 
possible with phased 

antennas, but only to show 
that phasing is not only un- 
critical, but also that there 
is no point in knowing 
more than the most simple 
and easily understood pat- 
terns. The smalt difference 
is not worthwhile. 

The main considerations 
are: How much space do 
you have, and which direc- 
tion do you want the anten- 
nas to cover? There is the 
additional factor of: What, 
if any, do you want to re- 
ject in the way of noise or 
other signals? 

I will also give some 
ground radial information 

for those who are using 
ground-mounted verticals. 
Even the poorest ground 
will not affect the phasing 



T3S 



appreciably. 

f have never used radials 
for ground-mounted ver- 
ticals, but onlv a pattern of 
five ground rods, as shown 
in Frg. 4. My ground is 
moist clay, so I know that, 
if it were sand, I would 
need more. 

I am not a gain nut, and I 
feel that, if I get into Ant- 
arctica with a 20-over-nine 
signal I won't spend much 
time worrying whether I 
get into Antarctica with 17 
over 9 or 23 over nine. The 
main thing is that I get 
there. 

The other consideration 
is: Can I cut out noise and 
interfering signals so I can 
copy them at all? 

Several years ago. I 
wondered how a roof- 
mounted single ground 
plane would compare wfth 
the phased array. I put one 
up and tried it out. This was 
on 40 meters at night. 

On the single ground 
plane, I received a scream- 
ing mass of signals from 
every direction. The signals 
from KC4USN, now 
KC4AAA, at the South 
Pole, were unreadable in 
this noisy situation But, 
when 1 switched to the 
phased array on the 
ground, there was the 
South Pole coming through 
clear and strong, and the 
rest of the band had 
quieted down remarkably. 

I was using a pair of ver- 
ticals spaced 66 feet and 
fed with equal lengths of 
coax. The antennas were 
east and west, and the 
broadside pattern was that 
of the fourth pattern in the 
first row, marked A (see Fig. 
1). I should have spaced 



the antennas 68 feet, the 
free space distance, but I 
forgot and used 66 feet. 
However, the difference 
was not noticeable. I have 
even used 54 feet, but the 
rejection was not quite as 
good, as it was more like 
pattern number 3, though a 
little better. 

The width of the pattern 
between half power points 
is only 60®, and the re- 
jection at the side is 
around 30 dB average. 

At one time during my 
twelve years of handling 
Antarctic traffic, I worked 
at 7.290 MHz after Radio 
Moscow signed off, at 0700 
GMT, and, at the same 
time, Johnston Island was 
handling phone patch traf- 
fic on the same frequency 
with California. If I 
switched my antennas 
east/west, they were S9. 
But, when I was 
north/south, 1 could not 
hear them, they could not 
hear me, and neither sta- 
tion could hear South Pole 
Station, as they were using 
beams. We worked like this 
through the entire season. 

This half-wave arrange- 
ment is the easiest to set up 
and the easiest to match, ff 
you will make the lines to 
the antennas equal, the 
pattern will be broadside 
at right ar^gles ^o the line of 
the antennas and will be 
the pattern rrjarked A, If 
you 'ire usihg 14AVQ 
antennas, with a 50-Ohm 
impedance, the paralleled 
fines will be 25 Ohms. This 
will give an swr of 2:1. If 
you feel that this is too 
high, there is an easy way 

"fa 

to fix that. In the line from 
each antenna, add a 



V 



V 



5^£t 



OUAntfft WAVE 



tan 1 ^,— . 75 fl 

-C i__A. J it- 



^ 



iOO 



fig. 2. 



W 



w 



AUtEtmA Bl 



MfttHHA mZ 



COtUL tiHSTHS OF Sffll CO*Sf 




T CONMCCTOf) 



40Ct TQ 
TITAHSMITrEfl 
ANt LENGTH - 



MftLF WAVE LENGTH 
or a Oft COAX 



TRJS 



EH 




WOT ^mnca to insebT 

DEL At LIME 



Fig. 3. 



quarter wavelength of 
72-Ohm coax, such as 
RC-59. This will raise the 
impedance of the line fo 
100 Ohms, and, when they 
are paralleled, the result 
will be 50 Ohms and the 
swr will be 1 :1 . If you use a 
tuner, there will be no 
point in adding the 75-phm 
line. 

If you use an antenna 
such as the 4BTV (or a 
homemade one) which has 
no matching coil in the 
base, then the impedance 
will be about 36 Ohms, and 
adding the quarter-wave 
RC-59 will be of more 
value. This will raise the 
impedance in each line to 
72 Ohms, and the swr then 
will be 1:1.44. However, 
again, if you use a tuner, 



you won't need the 
matchrng sections 

On 40 meters, the 
matching sections will be 
22'6" at 7.200 MHz. This is 
(246/7,2) X .66, corrected 
for the velocity factor of 
polyethylene line. 

Fig. 3 shows how the 
lines are connected. In- 
serting a half wavelength 
of SO-Ohm line at point X 
will delay the signal 180*^ 
and change the pattern to 
pattern B, the fourth pat- 
tern from the left in the 
bottom row. This will be 
end fire in the direction of 
the line of the two anten- 
nas. 

One more point should 
be made here: If you use 
any pair of antennas which 
are not identical, the pat- 



Band 


''Antenna 




A/4 


SO meters 




3.9 MHz 


60" 


40 meters 




7.2 MHz 


32'6" 


20 meters 




14.2 MH2 


16'6" 


16 maters 




21.3 MHz 


ir 



m 



316" 



in 



Q (J 



tt 



rnii 



5^9 



Spacing 
A/4 

63' 

34'2" 

11 '6" 



126' 
68'4" 
34'8" 
23'1" 



45' 
1/eA 

20*10" 

ir3" 

5'8" 
3'10" 



PofyetheEane (M) coax 
90* 135* 

1/4 A 3/8 A 



4rr 



227" 



irs' 



T7 



tt 



627" 



33'ir* 



17'2 



If 



ir5 



it 



iao° 

1/2 A 

45*2" 
22*11" 



15'3" 



Table 7, Dimensions for phased antennas. *Quarter-wave verticals or half of a dipole. 



137 




« ROD 



tl2 

COPPER 




$' RO0 



ALL ItODS caHNECtfD TQQETHER 



Fig. 4(a}. All rods connected together. If ground rods are 

used instead of radial s, install them as per Fig. 4(cl 




9" &RQUHO P^0t)$ 



«<° 0« J^ 




Fig. 4(bl Radial ground system (8 shown] illustrating inters 
connection of towers. 




ATTACH WIRE WlTW 
V|»KmNp4N(^ cm VPS 



HZ &4RE wtHE 



ea en m' 



ATTACH TO 
U'SOL? 




Fig. 4{cl Ground system utilizing four B-foot ground rods 

(illustrating proper connection of rods). 



terns may not be the same. 
For example, if you should 
use a 14AVQ with an older 
14AVS or with a 4BTV, 
which does not have a coil 
in the base, or a home brew 
type, this will be 180** out 
of phase, and the pattern 
will be end fire when the 
lines are equal. The reason 
is that the coil in the base 
of the 14AVQ changes the 
phase of the antenna 180^. 
In this case, you will need 
to add a half-wave section 
at point X to get a broad- 
side pattern. 

This is no great problem 
with half-wave spacing. 
Quarter-wave spacing will 
cause problems You can 
make everything simpler if 
both antennas are iden- 
tical. 

The closer the electrical 
lengths of the lines, the 
deeper the nulls at the 
sides of the pattern, but, in 
general the lengths are not 
critical. If you use new 
coax, you will have no trou- 



ble if you simply measure 
with a tape measure. It is 
not necessary to use im- 
pedance measurements. 

One thing worth know- 
ing is that the best results 
are obtained when the swrs 
on the two antennas are 
the same, 1 have had occa- 
sion to adjust one antenna 
or the other to compensate 
for nearby trees or metal 
objects, such as a wire 
fence. Even this wilt not 
make serious differences, 
but it is so easy to correct 
that you might as well do 
it. 

To sum up, use identical 
antennas and equal lengths 
of good coax, SOOhm, and 
you will have no trouble. If 
you only want to have the 
antennas fire in one fixed 
pattern, you can use the 
setup in Fig. 3, with a 
T-connector between the 
two antennas. When I first 
worked Antarctica for a 
few years running phone 
patch traffic, I used this 



system. 

I had quite a bit of noise 
from the power line, a 
steady S6, and this pattern 
cut the noise to practically 
zero. Also, most of the 
other stations I worked 
were in Florida, New 
Orleans, or South America, 
so I just left the antennas 
like that for three or four 
years before I changed and 
brought the lines into the 
shack where I coutd switch 
delay lines into the coax to 
the antennas. 

I might mention one 
other idea, in case you 
haven't already thought of 
it. If one antenna is closer 
to the shack than the other, 
which was the case with 
my setup, you can remove 
a half wavelength of line 
from the antenna feedline, 
since either line can be 
used to make the change 
from broadside to end fire. 

1 brought both 50-Ohm 
lines into the shack and 
coiled up the quarter-wave 
matching sections of 
RG-59 and hung them on a 
nail, as well as the half- 
wave delay line. 

Since the power is di- 
vided into two antennas 
and each feedline carries 
only half the power; RG-58 
is ample for a 200OWatt 
PEP sideband rig. I used it 
for years and only changed 
to RG-8 because it stood 
up better when buried in 
the ground going to my 
antennas. I always used 
RG-58 or 59 in the shack. 

Now let's take up the 
question of quarter-wave 
spacing, which takes up 
less space and, for some 
stations, is a better ar- 
rangement. The quarter- 
wave patterns are C and D 
in Fig. 1. 

It is also possible that 
you might want to use the 
pattern E. which is the bot- 
tom pattern in the second 
row from the left. 

Pattern C is the same 
condition as pattern A for 
the half-wave spacing. It Is 
what you get when you 
feed with two equal 



lengths of line, has a 
noticeable gain, a fair null 
on the sides, and is much 
better than a single ver- 
tical The most used pat- 
tern, however, is the one at 
D, which, for some sta- 
tions, is the best of all pat- 
terns. 

By inserting a quarter- 
wave delay line at point X, 
the cardioid pattern will 
fire in the direction of 
antenna #2. If you insert 
the same delay at point Y, 
the array will fire in the 
direction of antenna #1. 
The null on the backside of 
this pattern is very deep, 
about 40 dB, and is useful 
for taking out foreign 
broadcast stations, a near- 
by amateur, or a local 
noise source. The forward 
pattern is about 1 20° wide, 
and, by switching from one 
tine to the other, you can 
cover most of the direc- 
tions around you. If you 
are in the northwest corner 
of the states, you can fire 
southeast and cover the 
U.S. The same is true for 
the other corners of the 
country. The gain is a little 
better in this configuration, 
also It is about 4.5 dB, 
while the gain of the half- 
wave lobes is about 3.8 dB. 
It also has a lower angle of 
radiation than the half* 
wave pattern. 

If you insert a half 
wavelength of tine in either 
antenna lead, you will get 
pattern E, which is a slight- 
ly better end-fire pattern 
than the pattern at D, as far 
as gain goes. But the nulls 
at the side are not as broad, 
and the signals at the side 
will not be weakened as 
much. 

Another pattern which is 
very interesting is F. and, 
perhaps, so is C. This re- 
quires only an eighth-wave 
spacing, which is 17' at for- 
ty meters. In this case, the 
delay line is 3/8 wave, 
which is 33^11" at forty 
meters. 

This arrangement has, 
however, one great 

drawback. The swr. 



138 



because of the mutual im- 
pedance from the close 
spacing, can be quite high. 
In my case, it was about 
5:1 . When [ first tried it, I 
didn't have a tuner, so 1 
promptly took it down. 
Later I tried it again and 
found that a simple 
L-network would bring it 
down to 1:1. Since I only 
use ground rods instead of 
radials, I had no trouble, 
but, if you lay radials, you 
won't have room to run 
them in a circle. You can 
just run radials on one side 
of one antenna and the 
other side of the other. 

If you want the pattern 
at C, you wfll have to add a 
half-wave delay line in one 
leg of the array to make it 
end fire. 

Now that you have seen 
how simple phasing is, I 
hope you will try it out. 
Once you have tried it, you 
wtU never go back to a 
single vertical again. 
HyCain put out an 
engineering report on 
phased verticals a few 
years ago and said that 
they experienced a 1 2 to 1 5 
dB improvement on receiv- 
ing, and I believe them. 

1 will now add some 
general information on the 
subject- This won't add to 
any confusion, I hope, but 
will answer a few questions 
which will arise when you 
start to construct your 
antenna. 

First is the matter of 
ground system. HyCain 
suggests the use of six 
8-foot ground rods for their 
18HT antenna as a 
substitute for radials, ail 
about 6 inches apart 
around the base of the 
antenna. I use the method 
shown in Fig. 4, consisting 
of a single 8-foot rod at the 
antenna, no more than six 
inches away, and a square 
arrangement of 6-foot 
ground rods four feet 
apart, connected to each 
other and to the 8-foot rod, 
as shown, I have found this 
to be very satisfactory. I 
have so many trees in the 
way and my space is so 



limited that I simply can- 
not run radials. 

Another way is to run in- 
sulated wire radials on the 
surface of the ground and 
pin them down by the use 
of bent wire Us from coat 
hangers. The grass will 
soon cover them, and you 
can mow the yard right 
over them. The ends of the 
radials will be hot and 
must be well insulated 
either by plastic tape or 
pieces of tubing slipped 
over them and closed. 

If you use insulated 
wires, you won't need more 
than about 4 or 6 quarter- 
wave radials. When you 
use buried bare wire, you 
are using a different 
method. They are used to 
cut the ground resistance, 
and you need more. 

Of course, the very best 
way, if you are surrounded 
by trees and power lines, is 
to mount the antennas on a 
pipe, preferably a quarter- 
wave long, and raise the 
antennas in the air. Then 
three sloping radials will 
do a fine job* They will 
serve to guy the pipe or 
mast and will make a stur- 
dy installation. 

Another consideration 
is: What bands will you be 
working? Half-wave spac- 
ing on forty meters is 
quarter-wave spacing on 
seventy-five meters, and 
quarter-wave spacing on 
forty meters is half-wave 
spacing on twenty meters. 

Fig. 5 shows a simple 
way to reverse the pattern 
on any array with quarter- 
wave spacing, as well as to 
give a broadside pattern. 
The results of switching are 
very dramatic. Often if you 
ask a station to give you a 
signal report when you are 
firing in his direction, and 
then reverse it, he will not 
even be able to hear you at 
all. 

One of the advantages 
of the half-wave spacing 
firing broadside is that 
storms approaching from 
the west do not cause 
heavy static until they are 
almost directly north or 



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position 7, antenna A is fed directly and antenna B is ted 
through a quarter-wave delay line. At position 2, the direc- 
tion is reversed. At position 3, both antennas are fed equal- 
ly and a broadside pattern results. In position 1, there is a 
cardioid pattern toward antenna B and vice versa. 




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south of you. As they pass 
by, the static will fall off 
again as the storm goes to 
the east. 

When I was running Ant- 
arctic traffic, this was a 
great help, as it was sum- 
mer here when it was 
winter down there and the 
static here was often 
heavy. If this happens to 
you, it will sell you on 
phased antennas for good. 
Phasing will also im- 
prove 2 meter and CB 
antennas, and these 
smaller antennas offer 
great opportunities for 
wire arrays* 

The fundamentals of 
phasing are shown in Fig. 6. 
This is a half-wave spaced 
array and will show, for 
those interested, just what 
happens. 

#1 and #2 are similar 
antennas, fed with equal 
currents, and are not af- 
fected by any surroundings 
which might cause phase 
shift or reflections- 
Picture yourself at PI, 
which is a position equally 
distant from both anten- 
nas, Here you will get both 
signals from the two anten- 
nas arriving at the same 
time and, thus, with double 
the strength of one anten- 
na. If you were at position 



P3, the same conditions 
would prevail. 

Now put yourself at P2, 
and you will be twice as far 
from #1 as you were at PI. 
In addition, you are the 
same distance from #2 as 
you were at PI, We will 
assume that this distance is 
a half wave from antenna 
#2 and two half waves from 
antenna #1, The radiation 
at P2 from #1 will be out of 
phase with that from #2, 
and these waves will 
cancel. 

Thus, at PI or P3, you 
will get twice the radiation 
from a single antenna, and, 
at P2 or P4, you will get vir- 
tually no radiation from 
either, since it will cancel. 

This will give you the 
pattern in Fig. 6(b) You will 
have about 3.8 dB gain to 
the north or south and a 
loss of 30 to 40 dB from the 
east or west. Signals or 
noise from the sides will be 
greatly weakened, and the 
signals from the north or 
south will be not only 
stronger, but also free of 
the interference from the 
sides. Add this to the very 
low angle radiation from 
vertical antennas, and you 
will see that towers and 
beams are not the only way 
to work DX.H 



139 



The 21-Element 
Brown Bomber 



2m beam with sadistically strong signal 



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f/g. 7. Rear v/ew. Reflector-to-reflector dimerisions are ap- 
proximate to help yoi) visualize wf]at tfie actual comtruc- 
tion is. R1 and R7 go as dose to tfie er^ds as mounting per- 
mits. R4 is centered at the 36'" mark on the vertical masL 
R2 and R6 are outside the horizontal booms and as close 
to them as mountmg permits^ R3 is centered between R2 
and R4. R5 is centered between R4 and /?6. 



Dave Brown W9CGI 
R5, Box 39 
Nobiesville !N 46060 



This antenna really may 
be too much for the 
average 2 meter en- 
thusiast. It is larger than 
the average 2m yagi, 
though not really huge in 
the 20m yagi sense. 
Basically, it is one yagi 
over another and at closer 
spacing than you may be 
used to. The antenna is 
best described as a British 
J-slot yagi with some very 
different modifications. In 
slot terms, it is an "8 over 
8" slot, but there has been 
quite a modification in the 
reflector territory to 
enhance the front-to-back 
ratio. 

In addition to a written 
description on how I built 
mine, I will give a complete 
parts list in commercially- 
available part numbers. 
This should make it easier 
for you to acquire parts if 
you are far from big cities 



and supply houses. The 
vast majority of the parts 
are Hy-Cain, because they 
came from four 64B, 
4-e!ement 6m beams f had 
on 6m SSB for a while. The 
part numbers given under 
the part number column in 
the parts list are Hy-Cain 
part numbers from their 
64B yagi sheet. 

Fig. 1 is a rear view of the 
antenna. There are seven 
reflector elements making 
up the reflector "screen/' 
Curving the mast that these 
are mounted to into a 
somewhat circular form 
may enhance things, but 
the mechanics of that are 
much harder than the ef- 
fort is worth. Therefore, on 
this model, the mast is 
straight up and down, ver- 
tical to the ground. The 
circles in the drawing are 
the yagi booms, which are 
45'^ apart, center to center. 
The vertical boom shown 
at the rear (the front is the 
same, without the reflector 
elements), is 6-foot-long 
easy-to-find Reynolds 
aluminum tubing. Mine 
was number 4241, 1" o.d., 
.049" wall thickness. 
Measure and mark the 36" 



140 



center of the mast. From 
this mark, measure up 
22,5" and down 22.5'\ and 
mark these spots. The top 
and bottom reflectors go 
as close to the ends of the 
vertical mast as the 
mounting hardware will 
allow. The next s^et of 
reflectors working toward 
the center from the ends 
is placed so the reflector 
crosses the y^gi booms. 
This works out to be about 
1 2" from the end reflectors 
on mine. The next set of 
reflectors is another 
11-3/4" toward the center. 
This gives approximately 
equal spacing between all 
seven of the reflectors, or 
at least as close as other 
hardware will allow The 
last reflector, of course, 
goes at the center where 
you marked the 36" mark. 
At this point, I woufd 
like to cover how I 
assembled mine, as it can 
be unwieldy if you don't go 
about it right. The yagi 
booms will come to you as 
two each of booms 68 V4" 
and 75 % " long. First, place 
the cap plugs on one end of 
each of these 4 items. Now, 
using the ends that do not 
have cap plugs, lay one 
end of a 68^/^ '^ piece (rear) 
end to end with a ZSV-i'' 
piece (front) Use one each 
of items 3a and 3b (see 
parts list) to wrap around 
the end-to-end pieces. 
Before bolting lay the 
ends in one half {3a), and 
mark the boom pieces with 
a lead pencil where the end 
of the clamp touches the 
boom with the boom's 
splice centered in the 
clamp. This is so that later, 
when the boom clamp is 
closed over the boom 
pieces, you can be sure the 
splice is centered in the 
clamp. Do this on the other 
boom pair, as well Now, 
using the !4"-20 x Va" long 
screws (2a) and one lock 
washer and nut per screw 
from 2b, and using the 
outermost 4 holes of the 
clamp, loosely assemble 
both clamps, forming two 
12-foot-long booms with 



cap plugs on their extreme 
ends. When you are sure 

you have the splice 
centered in the clamps, go 
ahead and tighten the four 
screws on each clamp. You 
now should have two 
reasonably rigid 12'foot- 
long booms for later yagi 
assembly. 

If you have a workbench 
edge thathasno overhang- 
ing top (or can block it up 
flush), the next steps are 
easier. Assemble item 4, 
the U-bolts, into the 
clamps on the yagi booms 
with the U of the U-bolt on 
the same side as the V of 
the clamp. You should use 
all of the hardware of item 
4 in the parts list to do this. 
Don't tighten the U-bolts 
down just yet. If you pur- 
chase the EMT conduit in 
standard lO-foot lengths, 
now is the time to saw off a 
48" to 50 ' piece of it This 
becomes the center ver- 
tical mast of the array and 
allows easier assembly and 
mounting, as you will later 
see. Mark the center of the 
48" to 50" piece, and then 
make two marks 22.5" in 
each direction from the 
center mark. These marks 
will then be 45" apart, the 
distance that the yagi 
beams will be vertically 
separated On a targe flat 
surface (garage floor?), lay 
the two 12-foot booms 
about 45" apart with the U 
of the U-bolts down. This 
leaves the eight nuts up so 
you can tighten them. Slip 



the EMT conduit through 
the 4 loops of the U-bolts, 
and center the 45"-apart 
marks over the centerlines 
of the booms. When you 
are sure the two booms are 
in line with one another 
(hold one end of each 
against the floor at the 
front or rear of the booms), 
tighten the U-bolts with a 
wrench. If you are in a win- 
dy area [who isn't?), you 
may want to drill a 5/16" 
hole through each clamp 
(after you double-check 
boom alignment) and pass 
a 5/16" bolt (not listed in 
the parts list) through these 
holes. The hole should be 
in the center of the clamp 
on each side and pass 
through the boom splice. 
Use 5/16" flat and lock 
washers and nuts on these 
bolts (also, not listed). You 
now should have a rather 
large 12 foot "H" shape = 
With this 'H" on its side 
(EMT tubing vertical), you 
can use a U-bolt (not listed) 
to bolt the "H" to the 
workbench, so the EMT is 
about 1 foot off the floor 
and the booms are parallel 
to the front edge of the 
workbench. (I hope you 
don't mind holes in the 
front edge of your 
workbench, because, if 
you hit the right spot to not 
later have elements hitting 
your workbench legs, you 
must have cheated and 
measured things first.) 

Take the vertical mast 
you earlier marked off for 



the reflector support (rear 
vertical mast) and 2 of the 
U-bolts from item 22, and 
drill the booms so the 
U-bolts pass through them 
in a horizontal plane. Drill 
both upper and lower 
booms. Position the 
U-bolts so they are just 
ahead of the cap plugs. If 
you pass each of the 
U-bolts through the boom 
from your side, while keep- 
ing the vertical mast 
enclosed in the Unbolt 
loop, you have only to put 
a flat U-bolt plate [or flat 
washers) over the U-bolt 
ends, lock washers, and 
nuts and draw everything 
up just snug, If you put the 
EMT center mast at 1 foot 
off the floor, with the rear 
vertical mast just touching 
the floor, the 45" marks on 
the reflector mast should 
almost line up in the center 
of the last U-bolts men- 
tioned. Align them until 
they do and tighten the 
U-bolts. You now have a 
box 45" high by 68 !4'' 
wide, with the front ends of 
the horizontal booms still 
hanging loose out front. 

Move to the front of the 
booms. Drill both of these 
the same as for the reflec- 
tor vertical mast. Take the 
second Reynolds 6-foot 
long, 1 "-diameter piece, 
and saw it down to 50", 
Mark the center of this 
mast, and put two marks 
22.5" from the center (45" 
apart). Place the U-bolts in 
from the same side, and. 



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Fig. 2. 



141 



using same method, do as 
you did for the rear vertical 
mast. Line up the 225" 
marks with the centerline 
of the horizontal booms, 
and, again, draw the 
U 'bo Its down snug. When 
you're sure of the align- 
ment, tighten the bolts 
down with a wrench. You 
should now have a large 
and quite rigid figure "8" 
lying on its side that you 
can begin mounting the ac- 
tual antenna on. Up until 
now, you have been only 
working on the support 
frame. 

The antenna and frame 
are all aluminum, except 
for the center EMT mast 
and the steel hardware, so 
the overall array is quite 
light. One man can easily 
lift the finished array, but f 
won't kid you — it is rather 
unwieldy, and I would find 
some help and use a pulley 
arrangement getting it up. 

Assuming you are over a 
flat floor, begin the next 
phase by mounting all the 
directors on the lower 
boom. To do so, cut 12 of 
the 40" aluminum tubes 
(item 6) into two 20" pieces 
each. By all means, use a 
plumber's small tubing cut- 
ter as used on copper tub- 
ing. One with a Vi" or so 
capacity will handle this 
job and is quite inexpen- 




sive. Place one each of 
these aluminum tubes into 
the tube reducer (item 5) 
with most of it hanging out 
the small end of the 
reducer. Slip one of the 
compression clamps (item 
12) over each of the 
tube/tube reducer com- 
binations. Slip a square nut 
(item 16d) between the 
compression clamp and 
the reducer, and line up the 
hole of the nut and the slot 
in the reducer. Run a screw 
into the nut through the 
hole in the compression 
clamp and pull it down just 
finger tight. Do this to 24 
combinations. The 20" 
tubes should come just 
short of even with the fat 
end of the reducer, Do not 
tighten them more than 
finger tight at this time. 

The next step is to 
assemble the elements 
onto the booms where they 
belong, Mark off the upper 
and lower booms, as in Fig. 
2. Make the marks exactly 
along the top centerline of 
each boom, and you will 
save time later. Make the 
marks and the centerline 
imaginary Xs, and, where 
they occur, drill small start- 
ing holes for the self- 
tapping screws (item 16f). 
There are holes in the ele- 
ment clamps (item 1). At 
each of the starting holes 



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Fig. 3, Reflector mounting damps. 



in the booms, mount one of 
the element- to -boom 
brackets [item 1). Be 
careful to keep the 
brackets parallel to the 
floor Once the 1 2 brackets 
are mounted, use the other 
remaining 12 to form the 
bottom side of the mount- 
ings by loosely starting a 
screw (2a) and lock washer 
and nut (2b) at opposite 
corners of opposite boom 
sides of the bracket. 
Tighten only enough to 
bring the plates (upper and 
lower) close, but not so 
they're touching. You 
should have 2 screws in 
each clamp, 2 brackets 
(item 1) per clamp (or direc- 
tor position), and 12 posi- 
tions (6 upper, 6 lower) 
started. Now slip the fat 
end of one of the tube/tube 
reducer combinations into 
each opening of the 12 
clamps (24 openings in all). 
Then, doing one position at 
a time, draw the upper and 
lower plates snug around 
the 2 reducers, making sure 
the reducers are pushed in 
flush with the boom Also 
at this time, push the tubes 
in flush with the boom. 
With the bracket holding 
the reducer snug now, 
tighten the screws in the 
compression clamps with 
the screw oriented 
downward. This makes the 
tube and reducer into one 
rigid piece. The hole in the 
bracket allows some play 
on the #10 setf-tapping 
screw holding the top 
bracket, so, before you 
tighten the rest of the 
bracket screws inserted at 
this time, be sure the 
overall element is parallel 
to the floor (horizontal). 
Once all the alignment has 
been checked and is 
assured correct, tighten all 
hardware -V4 "-20, self- 
tapping, and compression 
clamp screws. When one 
director is done, move on 
to the next, doing the lower 
boom first, as it is closest 
to the floor and you can 
better judge the part 
parallel to the floor. Then 
do the upper boom, 



measuring either from the 
floor or from the com- 
pleted boom. From the 
floor is a good bet, if you 
have a long ruler or stick, 
and then you can use the 
measurement from the up- 
per boom element to the 
lower boom element as a 
cross check. If you have 
carefully cut the twelve 
40" pieces (item 6) exactly 
in half and pushed them 
into the reducers until 
flush with the boom in all 
cases, you now have, fully 
mounted, 12 directors of 
41^4". or 20-5/8" per side 
from the boom centerline. 
You can trim them later, 

The time has now come 
to do something about that 
bald reflector mast. Use 
the home brew clamps and 
mounting system of Fig. 3 
to mount the full length 
(40") of the seven remain- 
ing tubes. The reflectors 
are used at their full 40" 
length and require no fur- 
ther trimming like the 
directors, Mark a point 1" 
off center on all reflector 
elements. This point 
centers on the centerline of 
the mounting clamp and 
vertical upright mast. Let 
the long side be the one 
that goes to the long side 
of the mounting, or, in 
other words, the horizontal 
boom side, What this does 
is center the reflector over 
the horizontal boom and 
behind all the other 
elements. The fact that its 
point of ground is offset 
seems to cause no prob- 
lems at all — I.e., no false 
lobes, etc. You have 
marked the reflector masts 
earlier for where they go, 
and the same small starting 
holes for the self-tapping 
screws are used here for 
the mounting holes. Use 
the mounting bracket for a 
template on the vertical 
mast. All of the reflectors 
mount on the front, or 
driven element side, of the 
rear vertical mast. The 
reflectors form a "screen" 
behind the quasi-yagis, so 
try to align the reflectors 
so they are 90 degrees to 



142 



the boom and in one flat 
plane (vertical) to each 
other. Use Fig 1 to get the 
idea. This is a rear view of 
the array, with the driven 
element and directors 
omitted to avoid con- 
fusion. 

Let's get on to the live 
part of this whole 
aluminum farm — the 
driven element. When you 
find aluminum tubing, if it 
is soft enough to form into 
the rectangular form of the 
driven element of any 
j-slot antenna, it also 
deforms later (wind, birds, 
buzzards, whatever). If you 
find and use the larger 5/8" 
or 3/4'' — hard drawn- 
there are 90-degree plugs 
to form a square or rec- 
tangle out of straight tub- 
ing pieces. You can go that 
way if you like, but I have 
found a slick way for other 
projects that worked out 
well for this one, too. It is 
an aluminum U-channel. 
You can cut it neatly using 
a miter box and hacksaw 
for nice 90- or 45-degree 
angles. The driven element 
is 15" across, side to side, 
inside to inside. The height 
is cut one of two ways. For 
the FM man, use the inside 
of both upper and lower 
booms, or a dimension of 
43-3/4" outside to outside 
on the vertical sides. A bet- 
ter match for the SSB man 
in the 1 45 MHz territory oc- 
curs if the vertical parts are 
cut a full 45" on the out- 
side dimension and the 
tops of both booms are 
used for mounting, instead 
of between them as on the 
FM version. You may want 
to adjust these figures ac- 
cording to your choice of 
operation, even using the 
boom out sides for 
mounting in the case of 1 44 
MHz. The bandwidth is not 
all that critical, and my 
almost ffat 1:1 SSB version 
is only up to 1 .8:1 at 1 46.94 
MHz FM. The driven ele- 
ment gussets or clamps slip 
into the U-channel (facing 
rearward) of the driven ele- 
ment, and are secured by a 
self-tapping screw at their 



tail end and the driven ele- 
ment mounting screw in 
the channel itself. The ^'L"- 
shaped reinforcing corners 
have four holes and just 
slip down into the channel. 
Try to buy it all at the same 
store so you can try fitting 
the parts right there. They 
are all standard parts ex- 
cept the mounting brack- 
ets and gussets, in order to 
keep the metal work to a 
minimum for the weekend 
builder. They make Ts like 
the Ls that you could use 
for the gussets, but I just 
have never found anything 
available ready-made to 
beat the mounting clamps 
for the reflectors as I have 
shown. The L slips into a 
mitered (45 degree cuts to 
mate) corner, and then 
holes are drilled to match 
the holes already in the L, 
Slip a square-head nut into 
the channel over the 
L-plate and run a screw in 
from the channel outside 
side. 4 screws later, you 
have a very rigid corner. 16 
(total) and you have a very 
respectable and sturdy rec- 
tangular driven element. 
Don't forget to assemble it 
"around" the top boom in 
the SSB version. For FM, it 
just slips between the 
booms in assembled form. 
Be sure to use the gussets 
of some sort, or the driven 
element will pivot on its 
own vertical axis of the 




boom to driveii element 
mounting screws. It may be 

easier to drill the holes 
where the delta match will 
mount with the driven not 
mounted, I did it after with 
no problem. The holes go 
from the outside to the in- 
side of the vertical sides 
and into the vertical center 
of them. The holes pass 
through both walls of the 
U. The mounting bolts will 
later pass through the flat- 
tened ends of the delta 
feed, through both walls of 
the U, and a nut on the in- 
side of the rectangle. 

Cut the remaining 40" 
tube into two 20" pieces, 
just as you did the direc- 
tors. Flatten one end of 
each for about!", 1 suggest 
a vise and slow pressure for 
this, as a hammer seems to 
harden and make the tub- 
ing I used brittle- About 
Vi" down the flattened 
end, a small bend is plated 
to start a curve that wHI 
bend inward toward the 
centerline of the array 
from the outer edges of the 
driven element. Final form- 
ing can be done when you 
draw the two parts of the 
delta towards each other 
and their common 
mounting plate. That plate 
for me was a leftover 
ground plane radial plate 
from an old CB antenna. 
Any plate you can mount 
the delta to, but keep it in- 



sulated from, with about 
4" between the tube ends, 
is fine. See the drawing for 
a better idea. The delta 
mounts with the wide ends 
screwed to the center of 
the vertical upright parts of 
the driven element and the 
narrowing V portion facing 
forward. The 4"-apart por- 
tion of the V is almost 
under one and above 
another D-1 director Vi" 
PVC tubing makes a fair in- 
sulator if you use a 6" 
piece. Run T' of delta into 
it and bolt it V from the 
end you entered. Then 
clamp the other end of 
PVC in a ground plane 
clamp and bolt it, being 
careful not to get the bolt 
anywhere near the active 
delta tube. The clamp 
(item 11) is sawed in half 
and used to connect the 
coax to the delta feed. See 
the delta drawing to show 
the clamp positioning. 
Start with the dimension of 
13 Vi" from the front edge 
of the driven element and 
delta tube to the back edge 
of the clamp. Adjust from 
there for minimum swr at 
your desired frequency. 
The RC-8 coax feeding the 
antenna is brought in to the 
clamps (item 11), with the 
braid to one screw and 
clamp, and the center to 
the other screw and clamp. 
Which is which is like ask- 
ing, "do you like right-hand 



{MILL FIKHfT M01.E TO HATCH 
MQL£ CCHTEPlEa l*f U-CMAIin«CL 
ELCHEHT PLATE <5 THE* SClF 
POSPT CONINE 4 MO «igT l£ 
S£Lf CAPTIVE 



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GROUND PLAiiC PLATE 

U£££} TO SUILD t}£C-T|| lAATtH 



Fig. 4. Df\v^n^\em^n\'io-boom%u^sei[a.nt\-e\ementty^\sx). 



143 



horizontal polarisation or 
left-hand polarization?" (In 

other words, it matters 
not.) The delta match lies 
on the same plane as the 
two horizontal booms and 
halfway between them. 
The feed cable is dressed 
away from the delta feed- 
point in a 60-degree (not 
that critical) angle upward 
to the upper boom and is 
taped securely there and 
several places down the 
upper boom until the 
center vertical mast is 
reached, where it turns 
downward to the tower, 
shack, etc. The taping to 
the upper boom helps sup* 
port the delta match 
weight and holds it posi- 
tioned. Carefully make this 
feedline a multiple of half 
wavelengths. 1 Vi or 2 
should do it. If you do this 
very carefully and take in- 
to account the velocity 
factor of the coax you use 
(50 Ohm of some kind), the 
end of the cable can have a 
male connector at that 
point, and a bridge put in 
here will show exactly 
what it would at the anten* 
na feed pom t. A coaxial 
barrel can then join the 
coax to the down run when 
the meter is removed. Tape 
the connectors well for 
weather, and a coat of 
clear Krylon spray goes on 
everything here. 

I believe this should get 
you going. Even if you use 
your own home brew 
methods, the beam and 
principles all still hold All 
that remams is to trim the 
directors to the dimensions 
of Fig. 1. With a rigid ele- 
ment to work on and the 
cutter gadget, this really 
goes fast — almost too fast, 
so here is a trick to use to 
avoid errors. Item 10, the 
smaller cap plugs, can be 
added to all the reflectors, 
as they are already the 
right length (14 plugs). The 
remaining 24 plugs are 
added one at a time, as you 
complete each cutting. 
That way, if you are careful 
on your measurements, 
you cut each one only 



once. Aluminum is not 
cheap, and it's a good way 
to save a buck. 

Send an SASE for help, 
as always I put mine 
together in three evenings 



of about four hours each, 
working carefully and 
taking notes forthis article. 
Besides the great gain, the 
front-to-back is truly amaz- 
ing. I can null (0) an S-8 



signal by going front to 
back. Rather than quote 3 

dB beamwidths (14 de- 
grees), let^s say the usable 
beamwidth is about 25 
degrees. ■ 





Quantity 


1 


24 


2a. 


109 


b. 


109 


c. 


109 


3a. 


% 


b. 


2 


4a. 


4 


b. 


8 


c. 


8 


5. 


24 


& 


20 



7. 


2 


8. 


2 


9. 


4 


10. 


38 


11. 


1 


12. 


24 


13, 


24 


14. 


2 


15. 


2 



16. 



a. 
b. 

d. 

9. 
t 

0* 



17, 
18. 
19. 



20. 



21. 



4 

2 

16 
18 
2 
38 
4 



2 
2 
7 



7 

14 



1 



Parts List 



e!ement-to-boom brackets 

V4"-20 X y%" large stainless steel bolts 

or Hy-Gam hardware tor assembly of 

items 1, 3, 11, and 13 

%** stainless steel nuts or Hy-Gain 

hardware tor Item 2a 

V4" stainless steel lock washers or Hy- 

Gafn Hardware for Item 2a 

boom^to-mast body 

boom-to-mast clamp 

U-bolts 5/16" 

lock washers 5/16" 

nuts 5/16" #18 

tube/reducer 5/8" X TYi 

beta tube, 7/16" x 40", 7 for reflector as 

is; 12 split into 20*' lengths for 

elements before ''prooing"; 1 split into 

20" length for delta feed 

boom {rear half) 1%" x 68V4" 

boom (front half) IV^" x 75^A" 

cap plugs 1 V4'' for items 7 and 6 

cap plugs 7/16" for item 6 

clamp— sawed in hatf for delta feed 

compression clamps— for securing 

elements into tube/reducer (fitting 

part 6 Into 5) 

hardware for item 12— screw 10-24 x 

5/16"; nut square 10-24 

4" pieces of 5/8" o.d. PVC tubing delta 

feed insulators 

6-foot pieces of alyminum channel 

33/64" X 1/2" X 1/16" wall cut into 

43^7/8" and 15*^ pieces 

cadmium-plated stove tsoJt hardware 

for assembly of item 15 

3/16" X 1" screw 

3/16" XIV2" screw 



M 



3/16" X Vi" screw 
square nut 3/16" 
hex nuts 3/16" 

self-tapping hex head 'A "-10 screws 
corner L-braces 1/8" x 3/8" x ZVi" on a 
side to lay inside corners of channel 
forming driven element 
driven-^element gussets T' x 2" of .060" 
or thicker (see Fig. 4), 
ground pJane-type radial brackets 
(delta feed bracket) 
home brew reflector mounting 
brackets, ,060" material or better (see 
Fig. 3) 

cover plates (see Fig, 3) 
seif-tapping, hex-head, cad.-plated 1" 
jc 10 screws— reflector mounting 
front and rear vertical 
mast— Reynolds #4241 6 ft. long 1" 
o.d. by .049" wall aluminum tube stock 
48" to 50" section of IV*" EMT elec- 
trical conduit (center vertical mast and 
main support for mounting the array) 
U-boits and hardware for mounting 
front and rear vertical masts (item 20) 



Part# 

161422 



505325 bolt 

556960 nut 

567110 washer 

385142 

385144 

545146 

567075 

551026 

190002 



175637 
1 75648 
175649 
455630 
475e39 
165641 



165123 

505671 
555362 

N/A 



WfK 



144 







^ "^ M E ti 



SP^S^ 



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• 



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II 



The original DenTron Super Tuner The original Su- 
per Super Tuner. The original MT-3000A. And now 
DenTron brings you the original MT-2000A, an eco- 
nomicat, full power tuner designed to handle virtually 
any type of antenna. 

The sleek styling and low profile of the MT'2000A is 

beautiful, but be assured that is only a part of the ex- 
citement you'll derive from the MT-2000A. The MT- 
2000A is designed and engineered using heavy-duty 
ail-metdl cabinetry, and high quality American com- 
ponents ThroughouL 

When you consider the MT-2Q00A's unique features: 
514"H K WO X 14"W, front panel coax bypass 
switching, front panel lightning protection antenna 
grounding switch, 3KW PEP, and the ability to match 



coax, random wire and balanced feedline, we're sure 
you'll decide to buy an American original and stay 
with DenTron, 

MT-2000A $199,50 at your favorite dealer. 



Radio Co.. Inc. 

2100 Enterprise Parkway 
Twinsburg, Ohio 44087 



216 425-3173 



The Towerless "Tower 



ft 



new giounded-rotor design 



Robert H. Walker K4FK 

400 TivoU Ave. 

Cor^i Gabhs FL 35l4'6 

Roy D, Ma^z^gatti N400 
13551 S.W. 2Q4th SL 
Mismi FL 33157 



Amateur radio h ex- 
periencing a tre- 
mendous resurgence of 
growth. Many newcomers, 
however, are mrssing much of 
the potential pleasure of the 
hobby because they are 
settling for relatfvdy inferior 
dipoles or ground planes, 
even on bands for which 
directional antennas are 

Photos by Jwmm R. Allison WA4KIL 



commonly available. Today, a 
used triband beam and rotor 
can often be purchased for 
about the same price as a new 
multiband trap vertical. The 
problem then becomes one of 
supporting the beam, secure- 
ly, at some htrght above the 
ground* This immediately 
confures up visions >f a 
tower, both an ex pens and a 




Photo A, 



mechanical complexity with 
which many newcomers are 
unwilling or unable to cope. 
A telescoping TV mast is 
an alternate support structure 
which is summarily rejected 
by most hams. We, too, 
cringe at the thought of 
mounting both the beam and 
the heavy rotor on the 
weakest section of the mast 
and then relying on guy wires 
to keep the entire structure 
erect 

The following is a descrip- 
tion of a simple and inex- 
pensive method of making a 
telescoping TV mast into a 
reliable support for a beam or 
quad. This method has beer* 
employed at K4FK (formerly 
WA4FKJ) since 1971. During 
that period, there have been 
no failures or difficulties of 
any type. Photo A shows a 
50- foot telescoping TV mast 
supporting a 4-element 20 
meter yagi beam. The beam 
has a 26-foot boom and is up 
about 20 feet Note that no 
guy wires are used. The secret 
is to mount the rotor at the 
bottom of the mast and to 
turn the entire structure. 

Photo B shows the rotor 
mounting, A CDE Ham-M 
was used simply because we 
already owned it. There is 
certainly no need to use as 
heavy a rotor if you already 



146 



have a lighter one available 

The rotor is bolted to a piece 
of 24" X 12' X 1/2" ply- 
wood The size of the board 
is not critical J but it would be 
wise to avoid the use of one 
much smaller. It should be 
given several coats of paint 
for protectioa At K4FK, the 
original 1971 vintage board is 
still in use and shows no signs 
of deterioration. 

The rotor will need to be 
spaced about 1/2'* above the 
board to keep it from sitting 
directly on the control cable. 
CDE's Tower Plate (part 
number 50559-10) is excel- 
lent for this purpose. Flat 
washers will suffice if such a 
plate is not available. Use 
bolts about 3/4" longer than 
heces^^ary to pass through the 
board, spacers, and into the 
rotor. You will need to use 
flat washers as spacers on the 
bottom of the board. The 
boU heads and washers will 
dig into the ground and elim- 
inate the need for staking 
down the board. Since the 
rotor !s essentially at ground 
level, it is a good idea to use a 
coating of silicone sealer over 
the terminal connection 
block to help prevent corro- 
sion and accidental shorts. 

In areas where snow and/ 
or flooding occur, the rotor 
should be raised above 
ground level- Two possible 
ways of accomplishing this 
are: Mount the board on 
heavy brackets which are 
bolted to the wall of the 
building, or construct a set of 
cross-braced "legs" for the 
board. Just remember that 
your brackets or *1egs'* must 
be able to withstand the full 
torque of the mast and an- 
tenna system. 

Photo C shows a heavy- 
duty bracket supporting the 
mast at the eave of the roof. 
Your individual installation 
will determine the best type 
of bracket for you. They are 
available In many different 
configurations and sizes from 
TV antenna suppliers^ Make 
sure the one you choose will 
bold the mast clear of any 
roof overhang and will 
comfortably accommodate 




the outside diameter of your 
mast The bracket should be 
tightened sufficiently to 
eliminate any free play 
between the mast and the 
bracket, but left loose enough 
for easy rotation. Since there 
is metal -to- metal contact ai 
this point (unless you fit a 
bearing), lubrication will be 
necessary. Number 2 lithium 
grease has been found to 
withstand the rigors of the 
Florida climate and makes an 
excellent lubricant 

Your antenna can now be 
installed at roof level, making 
servicing and adjustment 
especially easy. In times of 
extreme weather, your arv 
tenna can be lowered to the 
ground in about 10 minutes. 
We fasten the beam to the 
n ex Mo-t he-smallest section 
of mast and then partially 
extend the heavier sections. If 
you favor the unguyed 
approach, a height of 18 to 
25 feet is safely attainable, 
depending on the size of the 
antenna. If youVe willing to 
employ guy wires on the 
mast's slip collars^ then a 
height of 35 to 40 feet seems 
reasonable. As a bonus, you 
can suspend an 80/40 meter 
inverted vee from one of the 
slip collars beneath the beam. 



Photo R 




Photo C 



With a quad, this becomes 
somewhat more difficult to 
do. 

No, you won*t be a **big 
gun" in the pileups with this 
arrangement. Your antenna 
performance will, however, 
greatly exceed that of a con- 
ventional dipole or a ground 



plane with only a few radials. 
You have come closer to 
maximizing the value received 
for your antenna dollar. 
Additionally, you have a 
good start on the proiect, 
should the day arrive when 
you decide that a tower is an 
absolute necessity. ■ 



147 



Call Toll Free for 
vacation hand-helds 





WILSON 
T-1407-MX 

2m handi-taiki 

• Frequency rnnge 
134^ 1 74 MM? • (, 
channel operation 

• Sens.t(v«!y 3 
CfOvnIls for 20 dB 

qutetmg • RF output * 
watts Of 1 watt selec- 
table • Power con- 
sumption receivt^ 15 
ma squelched 
transmil 1 3A i7W] 
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REGENCY 
HRT-2 
2m FM 

transceiver 

Features • 5 channel 
operation • 2W Hi out- 
put 1W LOW output 
* Oout)*e conversion 
super-hetfodyne 
receiver design with 2 
ceramic fdters • TX 
and R X sections 
employ band-pass c*"^- 
cuilrY- TX power & RX 
sensilivity are main- 
tamed across entire 
band (144-148 MH;) 

179,00 i^si price Call for quote 



T 

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WILSON 2m 
Mark II 
hand-held 

The small size har>d- 
beld featLifesexceHent 
adjacent channel 
selectivity & in ' pr- 
mod tmage rejection 

• 6 channel operarton 

• Inaivfdual trimmers 
on all TX RX Jtiais 

• Microswiich conlroJ 
of TX RX * Includes 
rubber fteK antenna A 
1 pan Jttj*is 146 52 52 
ins' '. 



261 .90 Rnce With touchstone pad 



iV/f^fftt 



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HYGAIN 3806 2m 
hand-held transceiver 

The 3806 IS an enitrety self-contained 
unit, Use o\/er medium distance or with 
repeaters • 144*143 UHi coverage 
• Current drain 3S0 mA at 12\fOC on 
tX 700 mA at 12VDC 00 RX • Power 
source S A A penlight or optional 
NiCad pack • 6 channels (146 52 
smipjex supplied) 1 Wtitl ouunr 

189,95 ""St pnce Call for quote 



I 

IS 

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w,/ 



SJUU 



WILSON 2m 
Mark IV 
hand-held 

The Mark IV small size 
hand- held has the 
same great features as 
the f^ark II The 4 watt 
Mark IV IB the ultimate 
hand-held for the 
amateur whodemands 
tiuality, performance Si 
value • Slult-in 
micros witch speaker- 
mic • 90 day warranty 



301 .90 Pf'Cf- with touch-tone pad 



oso, 




WILSON 1405 
SM 2m hand- 
held radio 

S channe! operation 

• 3 micro volt sen- 
si 1 1 v 1 1 y • 1 ? KHz 
ceramic fiitet • In- 
diufdual trimmers on 
all TX RX crystals 

• 10 7 & 445 KHz IF 

• Switchable5WoriW 
output • Totichtone 
pa6 included 

.• Recharger base 
available 



339*90 ffst price Calf for quote, 




Remember, you can call TOLL FREE: 1-800-633-3410 in USA. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 

Atabama for our low price quote. Store hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM. Monday thru Friday, 



VfSA 



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MAa ORDERS PO BUA 11j47 BIRMINGHAM AL 35?0? • STREET AODRb>.s ^Hnh rrHAvfNUf SOUTH BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA 3523,1 



Call Toll Free 

vacation portables 






WILSON WE-800 
2m synthesized radio 

Features. • 800 channels, from 144 to 
148 MHz. in 5 KHz Steps, up or down 
500 KHz from your local repeater 

• Pre-program 5 of your favorite fre* 
quencies • 12W HI/1W LOW output 

• Complete with mobile mount 
bracket/handle, rubber flex antenna. 
12 VDC charge cord • Internal Ni Cad 
cells are opitonal. 

459.00 ''St price Call for quote. 




ICOM IC-202 

2m SSB portable 

The IC'202 features • Frequency 
coverage. 144-146 MHz • Modulation: 
A3J and A1 • RF output power A3J 3 
watts (PEP), A1 3 watts • Sensitivity: 
0.5 microvolts at {S-N)/N .10 dB or 
better * Includes a true IF noise 
blanker • Requires "C" batteries or 
external 12 vol 1 source 



259.00 t^st price Calt for quote. 




ICOM IC-502 

6m SSB, CW portable 

The 502 is a 6 meter SSB and CW 
portable with telescoping antenna & 
land mic • Frequency coverage: 50 to 
51 MHz • Modulation: A3J and Al • RF 
output power: A3 J. 3 watts PEP a nd A 1 . 
3 watts • Sensitivity 4 microvoHs for 20 
dB quieting • Virtually no intermod. 

249.00 iist price. Call for quote 




<hacs» 



ICOM IC-215 

2m FM transceiver 

Features:* 1 5 Channel Capacity • MOS 
FET RF amplifier & 5 tuned circuits in 
the front enx! for optimum sensitivity 
and selectivity ♦ S-meter on front panel 
♦ Dual panet level, 3 watts HI for long 
distance, 0.5 watt LOW for local • Uses 
' C" batteries or rechargeabta cells, 

229*00 iist price. Call for quote. 



<- " 



^ t^ 




\.\.\ 



rm 



KENWOOD 

TR-2200A 2m transceiver 

The high performance portable' •-146 
to 148 MH^ coverage • t2 channels (6 
supplied) • 2 watts HI output or 4 
watts LOW output • ' * wave telescop- 
mg antenna • Also included: H\ Cad 
battery pack, charger, carrying case, 
and microphone. 

229.00 '<st price. Call for quote, 





DRAKE TR-33C 

2m transceiver 

TR-33C features • 12 channels (2 
supplied) • All FET front-end crystal 
filter tor superb fnlermod refection • N\ 
Cad ceMs supplied * Built-in charger 
• Low power dram circuit on squelch- 
ed receive • Lighted channel dial when 
usmg external OC power, plus much 
morei 

229.95 1'st price. Calf for quote. 



Remember, you can call TOLL FREE: 1-B00-633-3410 in U.S.A. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 

Alabama for our low price quote. Store hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM. Monday thru Friday. 



VISA 




WAJL ORDERS PO BOX n347 BIRMINGHAM AL 35302 • STREET ADDRESS 2808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA 35233 






•I1LII> 



nvcRTCM 
- rm 



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NPC 12-115 
power inverter 

The NPC 12*1 15 marme and RV solid- 
state power mvertef converts 12 volts 
DC to 1 15 volis AC (a 60 Hz output 200 
wans conifnuous operation with peak 
power up to 240 watts Now you can 
have the AC house current in your 
camper or boat to run any small elec- 
trrcai appHance 

69/95 list price Gail for quote. 



STOP-A-THIEF 

slide-out 
mounting bracket 

The SD 1-1 000 slide- out bracket will 
protect your mobile rig from sticky 
fingers It featufes a modified AMP 
Dulatcn connector system whfCh 
houses the AMP Mi nature Coaxicon 
coaxial cable contact. 4 power & 
accessory contacts are gold-plated 
VSWR does not exceed 13 to 10 up 
1000 MHz 

29.95 Cat! for youTs today 



^#E]0 



MFJ-941 
Versa Tuner 

MFJs new Versa Tuner II has • SWR 

• Duat range wattmeter • Antenna 
switch • Efficient airwound mdiiCtor 

• BuHt-fn 1,4 balun • Up to 300 watts 
RF output • Transmitter a antenna 
matching capacitors 208 pf 1000 V 
spacing 

79,95 listpfice Call for yours today. 



DRAKE 
1525 EM mic 

The aulO'paic h encoder and inike are a 
single unit, fully wired and ready to use 
• High accuracy IC tone generator, no 
frequency adjustmeni • Highrel*at>Hity 
Digilran *■ keyboard • Power for tone 
encoder from transceiver via mfke 
cable • Low output impedance* 4-pin 
plug 

49,95 Call for yours today ^ 




SHURE 414A 
hand-held mic 

Ideal for your mobile transceiver One- 
half the size of most hand miKes. Has 
an omnidifeclional polar pattern Fre- 
quency response: 400 to 4000 Hz High 
(mpedance, output level 54 5 dB Con- 
trolled magnetic mic element designed 
for SSB High impedance 50K ohms 

25.00 Call for yours today. 




TPL 702 

2m RF amplifier 

TPL 702 has • Solid-staie • Linear 
switch (FM SSB) • Broad band • In- 
put 10W to 20W, output SOW to 90W 

• Typical, 10W in/70W output • fw~ 
quency coverage 143 to 149 MHz, 

• 100W PEP typical output with proper 
drive 

1 39.95 list price. Call for quote. 



Remember, you can call TOLL FREE: 1-800-633-3410 in U.S.A. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 

Alabama for our tow price quote. Store hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM, Monday thru Friday. 



• 



I 




•n 



MAtL ORDERS PO BOX n 347 BIRMINGHAM At 3520? ■ STR£FI ADDRESS /H08 7TH AVFMUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA 



#■ 




ri>: 



■i^ 



DENTRON Jr. Monitor 
antenna tuner 

Tne Jr Monitor antenna tuner match- 
ing network has it ati m one neat 5 - x 
2 ^ 6 cabinet • Continuous tunmg, 
1 8 to 3D MHz • Forward reading 
relative outpul power meter • 300 wati 
power capability • Buiil-in encap- 
sulated baiun plus f^ucri. much more^ 

79-95 Can for yours lorfay 



YAESU FL-110 
mobile amplifier 

The FL'tIO IS a wide-b?ind SSB CW 
amplifier It is perfect tor Yaesu s new 
FT-7 mobile Transceiver Has 200 watts 
PEP solid-state construction 13 8 
volts DC operation Don 1 waiL supply 
hmited 

165.00 I'st price Calf for quote 

DENTRON all band HF 

doublet antenna 

' til" b«l';(J di.utjiH yr inwt*fU'danten- 

Mri covi-rs 160 IHrii lU mMtt?rs It tias a 
roraf lenqt^ uf I30 fr of 14 gai:qr 
sMandefl copper wirp Tuned & cenie^ 
fH*^thnj MlUtt of JGi)ohmPVCcaverei1 
tiansmi *si'3n hne Asst-^nDly js com* 

24,50 CaN tot /our*- lOday 




DRAKE AA-10 
power amplifier 

AA-10 has no relays— aulo TX RX 
swHching • Frequency coverage 144- 
148 MHz • RF output 10 watts mm at 
13 8 VDC* RFmput t watt nominal. 18 
watt ma^ • Receive lo&s Fraction of 1 
dB • SO-239 connectors • Power re- 
quiremenis 13 6 VDC at 1 5 amps • 10 
dB power increase 

44.96 Call for yours today 




TPL 7D2B 

2m RF amplifier 

r02B IS soha-siate featuring 
magneticaUy coupled Iransislors ^r^ti 
floating ground Linear Bias for FM or 
SSB Input 1 watt to 5 watts Output; 60 
watts to 80 watts Typical: 1 watt in, 70 
watts out Frequency coverage 143 lo 
149 f^Hi lOO watts PEP typical 

169.95 i*si price Cati for quote 



HYGAIN205 
5-element 2m beam 

The 205 has 5 eiomenis optimum spac- 
ed on a 75 boom plus • Gam 
(average). 11 3 dBi &'9 1 dBd • F B 
ratio. 2JD dB • Max SWR. 2 1*4 MHz 
aand width • Wax power, 500 watts 
PEP» Longest element. 39 - • Netwl 
^ 9 tbs • Turning radpiis 73 ' 

16.95 Call for yours today 



msstM' chsrii* 



1754 



You can use your 
Master Charge or 

BankAmericard/VISA 
when you order. 




YAESU 

FP-4 power supply 

The FP-4 IS designed for base station 
operation of the FT-7. FT-227R or 
similar transceivers Provides a DC 
output of 13 8 volts at 4 amps Also 
features overload & short-circuit 
protection threshold of 5 amps 

49.95 ''St prtce Call for yours today 




Call Toll Free 
vacation mobiles 









KENWOOD TR'7400A 
2m FM transceiver 



Features • CTCS provistons. encode 
and decode • 25 watt output RF 

• Solid-state frnal stage • LED readout 

• PLL gives 800 discrete channels 

• Repealer offset circu(t • PLL unlock 
protection circuit • MOS FET 

399.00 I'st price Call tor quoie 







3 



ICOM IC-22S 
FM transceiver 

Features • 22 channel radio • Fre- 
quency range 146 to 148 MHi* Preset 
any 15 KHz channel in the frequency 
synthesizer by the diode matrix boarc 
• Excellent spurious attenuation • IDC 
type ctrcuil controls moduiation 
bandwidth * Output lOW HI. T W LOW 

299.00 I'st price. Call for quote 



il^H llnHlfli iT 




"^ ^EW PUoiM jc:t 

YAESU FT-7 
HF transceiver 



The NEW FT-7 features • Frequency 
coverage: 10 thru 80 meters* Sensitivi- 
ty 5 micro volts tor S N 20 dB 

• Emissions: LSB. USB CW • Input 
power 20 watts DC • Compielety 
sohd-staie. single knotj tune-up • 100 
KHz calibrator built-in* Semj-break-in 
with sdetone • Receiver offset lunmg 

• Extremely compact for mstallalton 
under dashboard, 

499,00 list price Call for quote. 






*fg 



KENWOOD TR-7500 
2m transceiver 

The Tft^7500 has the features you 
need' • PLL synthesized • lOO 
channels (86 pre-programed, 12 extra 
diode programable • 1-know channel 
selectron • 2 digit LED frequency dis- 
play • Powered tone pad connection 
• 10 watts HI oiilput 1 watt LOW out- 



299-00 liSt price .Call for Quote 

4 




■COM IC-245 
2m transceiver 



• LSI synthesizer PLL • 4-digjt LED 
readout ■ TX & RX treqyenckes are 
independently programable on any 
separation • Receiver front-end is a 
balance of low noise, high-gain MOS 
FET ^ S section f titer • TX output 10W 
PEP and more' 

499.00 lisf price Call for quote 



t***!* 




4 '.H 



THE NEW YAESU 
FT-227R "Memorlzer 



Features • One knob channef selec- 
tion to select 800 channels • Memory 
circuit allows instant return to any fre- 
quency between 144-148 MHz* 4-digil 
LED readout • Selectable tO watt/1 
watt • PLL 'unlock' protection circuit 
and busy channel indicator 

319.00 l^s! price Call for quote. 



Remember, you can cati TOLL FREE: 1-800-633-3410 in U.S.A. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 
Alabama for our low price quote. Store hours: 9:00 AM tit 5:30 PM, Monday thru Friday. 



VfSA 



I 



I 



I 




MAIL ORDERS PQ BOX 11347 eiRMlNGMAM. AL 35202 • STRErr ADDRESS 2806 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BrRMlNGHAM ALABAMA 35233 



Call Toll Free 

vacation antennas 





LARSON 
LM-MM-150K 
2m % mag 
mount antenna 

The - wav*"« ipngtn 2 
meter antenna con* 
SiSts of a 49 stainless 
>jf»€i rod quadfupie 
pMled and coil for use 
Dt'tween l44-t74 MHz 

• A full 3dB gam over a 

wave length anten- 
na Magnet 
guaranteed perma* 
n»mt m ordinary use 

• Full capacitance 
coupling • Compleie 
with 12" of RG-58 A * 
coax & coax connec- 
tor 



38.45 Call fof yours today 



Mm ntoDiJci 




HUSTLER 
BBLT-144 

% antenna 

• 3 -^ -18 9air> uvet 
vuavf- a^f**nn*i^ • ^ iQ 
W.MtS FM pow^ - rating 

• Whip & rTTuurtt ^c- 
rifgh "111 tvpical 
SWR at resot'anc" 

• Sturdy stamJess, 
stefl impact spring 



• 1 i ' i s 1 1 H n I e s s 
radiator • TrimH hp 
mounf easv ^nstaua- -^ 

t»on nn dniltng 

33,75 Call I'^r y lurs today 




't 




B&W AT-200 

2m antenna matcher 

Usi' yoijT aLJfomobih.' AM FM ,intennri 
Ujr 2'm(*tfn mobile Tunes 144- 14B 
MH/ • Fi'.iMt-p.tnel tuning d -'ailing 
aOj tistments * LED mdicatut to show 
wr>en you havf mditm , - output 
. • VSWR AaiustaPte to T ■ or less 
A ^ "^losi antennas • Pow*^* capacity 
50 warts 

24,95 Calt ft>r yours t(,»day 



ANTLER 
A- 280 
2m mobile 
antenna 

The A-2B0 is as close 
to the ideal antenna as 
you can get Features 

• Preciston tuned coil 

• 47 tapered 17-7 
stainless steet whip | i 

• VSWR less than 1 3 

• Certified 3 dB gam ^ 

• (Magnetic mount has 
roof-top stability to 
withstand winds up to ( 
100 MPH 

39.95 ffst price Catr for quote 




HUSTLER 
RM resonators 

An fL'sonators are 
precision wound with 
opt I m? zed df^siqn toF 
each band Asserr^bly 
iricUides 17'T stainless 
sit'ei adjustable tip rod 
tof lowest SWR and 
band edge marker 
Chuose tor mednim or 
iiigh power operation 
Power rating 400 
watts SSB Call for 
yours today 

RM-tO meter resonator 
Rfv/l-15 meter resonator 
RM'20 meter resonator 
Rtv1-40 meter resonator 
RW-75 meter resonator 
RM-80 meter rpsonator 






HUSTLER 


1 




antenna accessories 






MO 1 masi fof decM 






or kinder mount 


2200 




MO'2 mast for 






bumper mount 


22.00 




RSS-2 resonator spring 




6.50 


for either mount 


5.65 


6.95 


BM-1 bumper mount 




7,30 


fits any shape bumper . 


14.75 


13.20 


L- 14-1 44 feed J me 




15.50 


144' long with PL-259 




15.95 


connector & split lead 

■9 


4 85 



Remember, you can call TOLL FREE; 1-800-633-3410 in U.S.A. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 

Alabama for our low price quote. Store hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM, Monday thru Friday. 



I//S4 




fUlAlL ORDERS PO BOX 11347 BiPIMIMGhAM Al 35?0? • STREET ADDRt,-*-, ^'808 7TH AVENUE SOUTH BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA 35233 



the Two Hour, Two Meter Beam 

simple five-element loop yagi 



WiUium Thomburg WB9TNW 
406 E. Jackson 
Deioto IL 62924 



The quad, or loop, 
antenna is a special 
antenna to me. Perhaps 
this is because of its antiq- 
uity. I remember old 
movies on TV where wire^ 
less operators used re- 
ceiving "loops/' And, on an 



often traveled highway 

near my home, an amateur 
had a tremendous triband 
quad array. I didn't recog- 
nize it for what it was until 
many years later, but I 
knew it had something to 
do with radio. 

My need for a two-meter 
antenna became acute 
when I had to remove my 
old home brew wooden- 
masted ground plane from 




my tower to make room for 
a new steel mast rotor, and 
triband boam system. 

Tlie excitement of an HF 
bean caused a virtual end 
to two meter activity. After 
a few weeks, I rigged up a 
mobile antenna on the top 
of a bookshelf and was 
able to trip the local 
repeater. However, my rig 
is a two-Watt affair, and I 
began to get complaints of 
a scratchy signal. 

It only took a couple of 
days of rummaging 
through the ARRL Antenna 
Book and the Radio 
Amateur's Handbook to ar- 
rive at a plan: a quad for 
two. 

1 chose 146 MHz for a 
target frequency. The siz- 
ing of the passive elements 
is roughly a 3% series. For 
example, the reflector is 
about 3% larger than the 
driven element, the first 
director is about 3% 
smaller than the driven ele- 



ment, the second director 
is about 3% smaller than 
the first director, etc. For 
those desiring a different 
target frequency, start with 
a driven element which is 
(1005 X 12)/freq. in MHz 
inches around, and scale 
the passive elements 
according to the 3% rules, 

A person who is experi- 
mentally minded might 
''adjust and test'' in an at- 
tempt to optimize this 
antenna. Factors such as 
taper ratio, element spac- 
ing, wire size, and feed 
system alt or partially af- 
fect forward gain, swr, feed 
impedance, bandwidth, 
and front-to-back. I was in 
a hurry and just slapped 
things together. 

The construction of this 
antenna is simple, and the 
pictures tell it all. My old 
ground plane mast was an 
8-foot two*by-two. I 
hacked it up into a 6-foot 
length for the boom and a 




SHIELD 



CTHTtll CWtOUCTQlt 



zoA^. 9oa 



Fig. 1. 



1&4 



2-foot (ength for a shorty 
mast. The spreaders were 
made from 5/16" wood 
dowel stock. Another good 
material would be fiber- 
glass arrow shaft stock. 
You could even use balsa 
or spruce sticks. The 
critical dimensions are in 
Table 1. 

The elements were made 
from 18 AWC solid copper 
wire. Plastic insulated wire 
could be used. Magnet 
wire from old television 
power transformers would 
be perfect and the price is 
right. 

Each element requires 
two spreaders, so 1 used an 
offset of about 0.5 inches 
when I drilled my holes in 
the boom. A drill press is 
the ideal tool for this job. 

I made my spreaders a 
shade longer because I 
notched the ends with a 
moto-tool to accommo- 
date the wire. You could 
use tape or string for the 
same purpose. I used 
epoxy to glue the spreaders 







Dowol 




LenQtK 


length 


Element 


(inchet) 


(Inches) 


Reflector 


85 


30 


Driven element 


83 


29.3 


First director 


80 


28.3 


Second director 


77 


27.2 


Third director 


74 


26.2 



Interelement spacing (inches) 

reflector to driven element— 17 
driven element to first director — 13 
first director to second director— 16 
second director to third director— 21 



in the two-bv-two boom, 
using straight pins to hold 
some of the loose ones. 

When cutting the wire, 
allow an additional inch or 
two. When you solder the 
loops closed, snfp the ex- 
cess wire off. 

My 2-foot mast was butt 
glued to the boom, and 
gussQt plates of scrap %*' 
plywood were used, A few 
screws hold the wood 
together nicely while the 
glue hardens. The joint be- 
tween the two-bytwo mast 
and the pipe mast of my 
antenna installation was 
made using one U-bolt and 
one hose clamp, because 
that's all I could find at 
that moment. 





iiermaBti 
Anateir 



MPA 




Jn 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 



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(A} Complete Service Facilities 

(B) Good Deals on most Brands 

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FOR YOURSPECiAL 



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G-12 



Write: 3202 Summer Ave., Memphis, Tennessee 381 12 



Table 1. 

I used the diamond con- 
figuration, and feed was 
applied at a side corner to 
achieve vertical polariza- 
tion. No special matching 
was attempted. I just con- 
nected the ends of the coax 
in the loop [See Fig IJThe 
passive elements are 
closed loops. The end of 
the coax could be potted 
with epoxy to keep water 
out. A touch of varnish 
would help preserve wood 
parts. 

On the air, results were 
very satisfying. My friends 
report a 2 to 3 S-unit front- 
to-side and front'to-back 
ratio. In fact, with my two- 
Watt transmitter, I can 
hear stations that can't 



hear me. 

According to the 
classical antenna theory, a 
5-element yagi parasitic ar- 
ray has a forward gain of 
about 9.5 dB. This quad 
parasitic array seems to be 
behaving in a similar 
fashion. For the person 
who would like to bone up 
on quad theory, a sug- 
gested starting place is 
Hardy Landskov's article, 
"Evolution of a Quad Ar- 
ray/' in the March, 1977, 
issue of QST. Also, my 
copy of the ARRL Antenna 
Book has always been a big 
help. 

A special thanks goes to 
Mr. Lucius Smith for his 
photographic skitL ■ 



New! 

Better than a pet rock! 



I 





Kantronics Freedom VFO 



only 

$69.95 



With almost 3 SO. 000 licensed amateurs on the air, 
variable frequency operation isn^t a luxury, it's a 
necessity. 

Jf you V^ tried to operate a rock- bound transmitto on the HF 
bands tcxfay, you know there must be a better way. There is. 

The Kantronic« Freedom VFO will drive the high 
impedance oscillator tubes of transmitters like the HW-16, 
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The Freedom VFO sets you k&s to roam from 3.650 to 
3750 MHz and 7.000 to 7.200 MHz. 

Give your pet rocks to m trusted friend and order a 
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of authorised Kantronics dealers. 

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Contact JBW for pricing! 




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ff any of our crystals go bad at any time, JBW Electronics will 
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i9 



156 



Lr°t] RANDOM WIRE ANTENNA TUNER 



AH tiand operation (160-10 metcrB) with 
any nandom lengtii of wire. 200 watt 
output power capability— will work with 
virtiially any transceiver. Ideal for port- 
able or home operatiofl- (jte^t for apart- 
ments and hcjtcl njoms— simply run a 
wire iniiidci out a window, or anyplace 
available. Eflldent torold Inductor for 
amall size: 4^ 1/4'' x 2-B/8" x 3",aiid negli- 
gible lo^iB . Btii1t-ln neon tune-iJ^ indicator. 
SO-2;^ connector, AttractK^e bronze 
ntilshed enclosure. 

only $Z9«H3 



THE ORlCtNAL Random Wire Antenna 
Tuner. , . in use by amateufS for 6 years. 



SST T-2 ULTRA TUNER 

Ttincs oiit SWR on any coax fed antenna as well ai; mndom 
wijies. Works great on all bands (80-10 meters) ^Hlh any 
transceiver running up to 200 vnatt^^ jiow^cr <KttpuL 

Increases usable bandwidth of am^ antenna Tunes oat SUTion 
mobile whips from loBide your car, 

tlses efficient toniid inductor and Kpedallv nmtic caiwcitoiB 
for HmaU size: 5-1/4" x 2-1/4" x 2- 1/2", Rugged, yet aiinpact, 
Negligible line lose. AttiBCtlve bronze finished enclosure. 
SO-269 coax connectors are used for transmitter input and 
coax fed antennas. Convenient binding posts arc prmidcd for 
random wire and gtoimd connectionB, 




only $39.95 



$19.95 



SSTT-3 

Mobile 



lance Transformer 



Matches 52 ohm coax to ihe lower impedance of a mobile 
whip or vertical. 12 -position switch with tap^ spread 
between 3 and 52 ohms. Broadband from 1-30 Mhz. WiH 
wofk with virtually any trBnscei\er — 300 watt output 
power capabilitv. SO- 239 oonncctois. Toioid Inductor for 
sniaU sizei 2-3/4" x 2'* x 2-1/4". Attractive broitze finish. 



GUARANTEE 

All SST prtxlucts are guaranteed for 1 year. In addition, 
they may be retu nied wi tl i in 10 flaj's for a ftill refiintl ( le«s 
shtp{>lng) If 3'au are not satisfied iijr anj^ reason. Ilt^asc 
add 92 for nhipplng and handling. Cali£ ic^dents, please 
add sale^ tax. COD orders OK by phone. 



♦•A *- 



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xx"T: 



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•v*^-. 






^ 




»*T-A1 






I' 



s — i — r"'T — k*' ' T 

riR i- ,, 

only $29.95 

^9.95 wire and tested 



SST A- 1 VHF Amplifier Kit 

1 watt input gives you 15 watt** outfnif acroes tlic entire 

2 meter band witlumt re-timipg. ITils easy*to-btilld kit 
(approx. 1/2 hr. assenibly) includes c\'er\lJiJng >i>u need 
for a complete amplifier. All top quality components. 
Compatible with all 1 -3 watt 2-metcr trarwcelvera. Short 
atid open protected— not damaged hiy M0i SWIL 

Kit includes: 

• Etched and drilled G-1 epox>' solder plated boazil 

• ileat sink and mounting hjiidw^re. Ml aimponcnts— 
including pre -woimd coils. 

• Top quality TRW RJ" power tran^lfitor. 

• Gjmplete assembly instruction with details on a 
carrier operated T/R swltdL 




SIO 



P.O. BOX 1 LAXA/NDALE, CALIF. 



157 



Now Try 1296 MHz 



simple discone antenna 



John M. Franke WA4WDL 

1006 Westmorland Ave., Apt 225 

Norfolk VA 2550B 

Norman V. Cohen WB4LJM 
771 9 Sheryl Drive 
Norfolk VA 23S05 



Ask most amateurs why 
they do not try the 
microwave bands, and you 
will receive four standard an- 
swers: 

1, Nobody to talk to. 

2. No commercial 



equip nimt available, 

3. Communication is 
limited to tine of sight. 

4, Construction re* 
quires lathe and mill 
precision work- 

The first reply Is self- 



EPOXY 



R4D0W£ 




UPTtltie 
HOLE 



WOT TO SCALE 



Fig, }. Inverted discone antenna. 




serving ~ if you get on the 

band, then there is another 
operator to talk to. The sec- 
ond reply is sadly true, with 
the exception of the Micro- 
wave Associates "Gunn- 
plexer." The third reply re- 
minds us of the response to 
two meter FM before repeat- 
ers came on the scene. The 



fourth is a myth — many of 
the pioneers in microwaves 
started wtlh a soldering iron 
and tin snips. Good examples 
of what can be done with 
simple tools are the many 
fine construction articles by 
Bill Hoisinglon K1CLU 

This article shows how to 
construct simple and efficient 
broadband antennas for 1295 
MHz and up. The construe- 
tioo is not difficult and can 
be done with simple hand 
tools. The antennas can be 
classified as inverted discones. 
You can find the theory of 
operation elsewhere; this will 
be concerned with the practi- 
cal construction* 

Fig. 1 shows a cross sec- 
tion of the inverted discone. 
The conic portion has a 
60*degrce apex angle. The 
cone's base and sides are all 
made three-eighths wave long 
at the lowest frequency of 
interest* Most texts specify 
this length to be one*quarter 
wave, but we have found that 
ihree-eighihs wave gives a sig- 
nificantly lower vswr. The 
disc diameter is also ihree- 
eighths wave. The cone is 
made by cutting a semicircle 



iJU 



FREOUCNCY inHl\ 



2.9 



3,0 



9.9 







/. 




* *■ ^L 




.- 




Y 


IH" 






. ' 




y 


iBOr 


^1 








US' 



Fig, 2 Vswr of J 00 mm inverted discone antenna. 



Fig. 3, Polar plot of 100 mm inverted discone. 



158 



from copper or brass sheeting 
with a radius equal to the 
desired length and rolling it 
into a cone. The edges are 
sweat soldered. The BNC con- 
nector is sweat soldered to 
the disc, and then the cone 
peak is soldered to the con- 
nector's center pin. The en- 
tire assembly is slid into a 
Rexjglas"''^ radome which 
serves to support the cone 
and weatherproof the an* 
tenna (see the photograph). If 
the radome is allowed to ex- 
tend below the disc, it can 



serve as a convenient mount* 
ing ring. The antenna in the 
photograph has a base diam- 
eter of 4 inches (100 mm). 
The vswr from 1 GHz to 3-5 
GHz is shown in Fig. 2. A 
typical radiation pattern is 
shown In Fig, 3, The antenna 
is vertically polarized. The 
horizontal radiation pattern is 
a circle. The useful band* 
width for an inverted di scone 
is 5 to 1 ; a 1 GHz design is 
useful to 5 GHz. A smaller 
unit would be usable to still 
higher frequencies, ■ 




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Standard Communcatifsna Handhelda, 

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pp-1 =$56.00. PP-2=S58[>0. PP 1A=S58 00 

pp*1 M=$55.00. PP 2M=S58,00. M sftri«iMdbil« 

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K' series = Self Contaiined Detav R*l*y 

LETTERING OF UNITS OPTIONAL 

Availabltf at. Ham Ra^jto Cenier (AOO^ 325-3636 

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P.O- Box 3435 DepI C 
Hollywood, California 9002d 
213/852*1515 





II JUST IN TIME FOR FIELD DAY II 






The HF BAPITAM D I POLE is a truty portibte atlband miniaiuTe drpoie 
complete widi its own carryinfl case and ma$t/hardware ta mount on a 
camera tripod (3/fi" x 24" adaptor available). High performance is 
obtained on 8 D- 10 meiers at its normal 13 foot lengtii or the same an ten n a 
mty be shortened to 7 feet tor 75-10 meter coverage. Polarization is 
quicUy inisrchan^ablc from horizontal ui vertical. No ground system 
necessary. The BANTAM OIPOLE is ideal for camping, ii^efmg. 
mountain tap ping, apirtment living, oc if you're Huck with building code 
resThctions. Construction is of high quality G0&1-T6 atuminum and 
stainless steel hatdware, 

30-day money back guarantee. $59.95. 

plus U.P.S. shipping 




MM 
NTER 



Send S.A.E. for sp^c sheet 

U.S. patent pending 

Dealer inquiries invited 



Laurel Pl3za-RtB 138 
Laurel MD 20810 301-792-0600 



DRAKE • ICOM • TEIM-TEC * TEMPO • Wilson 



1. Downward! Pressurm 

Assures, Kty WiifMot 

W^lknrSHd^ 

3^ War is With An^ 
Ketf^r^ /tmrbic 7&o/ 




0.Bft}ck Pf^stic Top 
Satm CAftNfte fififSff 

Z ^rSoam&fkmd^ With 
Mmjt C^H CSpecrfj) 

8. it's Etf^fffmrnred f 
Thif tt~... y<WJ V Ukm ft 



SEE YOUR DtSTftmUTOR 
OR ORXH DIRECT 



-5!!^S39 



9S 






C75^ 



QUIK-KEY 



RO. BOX 73 
KATONAH , N.y ios36 

FmElG9t ORKRS:aS.FtmOS / MY STATE /tESWENFS 
PLUS POSTMCE t iHSWAHCEf A&a SX S4LES TAX 

fmm€di^tBO€h'^.rif 'Order Mem Oealer kff^m'res lavited 



159 



Joe KasssT C3ZCZ/WZ 
1 1 532 Stswart Lane 
Silver Spring MD 20904 



The OSCAR Boppers 



turnstile antennas 
for 145 MHz and 432 MHz 



This antenna is cheap and 
simple, is made uuL of 
aluminum angle and Plexi- 
glasTM^ requires no special 
tools, and anyone can 
assemble it in less than 30 
minutes. 

The same basic design may 



be used for both 145 MHz 
and 432 MHz. 

The dimensions of the 
eEements and the matching 
sections are different for each 
band, of course, but the 
center section is the same. 

Aluminum angle may be 




purchased in six-foot lengths. 
If one such length is cut into 
four equal pieces, it is the 
correct size for the two meter 
turnstile. 

The center piece, shown in 
Fig. 1 , is a piece of 
Plexiglas >S-inch thick and 
1-inch square on a side. Four 
holes are drilled in each cor* 
ner for mounting the ele- 
ments and a center hole is 
drilled for mounting the 




whole thing to a mast. The 
holes can be measured and 
drilled 14 inch away from the 
sides, or the elements can be 

placed into position and spot 
drilled using a drill press. 

The elements are shown 
mounted to the center piece 
In Fig. 2. A no. 4 boll passes 
through the center piece and 
clement A washer is placed 
on the bolt below the Plexi- 
glas, A solder lug is placed on 
the bolt between the washer 
and the nut> The coax cable is 
soldered to the lug later. 

The 70 cm antenna is 
made in the same way but 
with shorter elements. A re- 
flector element can be placed 
beneath the driven element. 
The antenna can be fed in 
any manner that you wish, 
for circular or linear polar- 
ization. One technique is to 
mount the antenna facing 
north -south and feed L-ich 
dipole in a linear polarization 
mode, switching antennas as 
necessary, A second tech- 
nique is to use circular polar* 
ization, but that has to be 
changed when going from 
receive to transmit via 
OSCAR. 

Results in Use 

Both the 432 and 145 
MHz versions have been used 
to access the AM SAT OSCAR 
6 and 7 spacecrafts. The 432 
MHz version was fed with 8 
W of CW power, and 599 
signal reports were received- 
The 145.9 MHz version was 
fed with 50 W of CW power, 
and signal reports of 569 
were received. 

For $2.00 and 30 minutes, 
you can't go wrong. ■ 




urASHEn 



WAST 



Fig. 2 Materfofs: Pfexiglas block, 1 '* square, }i" thick; !4'* 
aluminum angle lengths; nuts, bolts, washers, and solder lugs. 





Element 


0.22T X 


Reflector 


Frequency 


length 


spacing 


length 


14B.9 MH2 


18" 


not used 


not used 


432 MHz 


5%" 


6 3/4" 


0" 



/oe Kasser with his two-dollar turnstiles. 



Table L DtmensJons for the elements. 



160 



FOR 2 METERS 



II 



rb# 



I 7 .9 9 t' 



f3?rt 



ihei'mrj^ 



The Synthesizer [ ( is a two meter frequency synthesiz©". 

Frequency is adjustable in 5 KHz steps from 140,00 
MHz to 149.995 MHz with its digital readout thumb 
wheel switching. Transmit offsets are digitally pro- 
grammed on a diode matrix, and can range from 100 
KHz to MHz. No additional components are 
necessary! 



Kit - $169.95, Wfred & tested - $239.95 

SPEC! FrCAT IONS 

• Frequency: 140.000 - 149.995 MHz 

• Transmit offsets: Simplex, +600 KHz, - 600 
KHz plus 3 additional field programmable 
offsets, 

• Output: 3 volts to a 50 load 

• I nput voltage: 11-1 8VDC at ,900 amps 

• Size: 8" long x B'A" wide x 2%" high 

20.32CM X 13.97CM x 5,71SCM 

• Complete kit including all electronics, crystal, 
thumb wheel switch, cabinet, etc. 



FEATURES 

• T^L Logic 

■ Maximum offset versatility — easily programmed to 

any IF and transmitter offset between 100 KHz and 

30MHz in even lOOKHz increments (simple MARS 

modification available). 
» Simple jumper wire change enables use on rigs with 

6-8 or 12 MHz Transmit crystals. 
> All frequencies locked to one master cyrstai oscillator 
I 2 pote output filter on receive Hoe. 
I Virtually no measurable difference in spurious outputs 

between crystal or SYN IL 
I Lockup time typically 150 milliseconds- 
I Easily interfaced to most rigs. 



FOR 220 MHz 



.44 



« 



jii 



2 2 ^ .9 9 



iVlitllCj 



Iter 



2Z0 



Kit - $169.95, Wired & tested - $239.95 

SPECIFICATIONS 

• Frequency: 220 - 225 MHz 

» Transmit offsets: Simplex, +1.6 MHz, — 1.6 MH? 

plus 3 additional field programmable offsets. 
■ Output: 3 volts to a 50 load. 

• Input voltage: 11 - 18 VDC at .900 amps. 
i Size: 8" long x 5%" wide x 234" high 

2a32CM X 13.97CM x 5.71 5CM 
» Complete kit including all electronics, crystal, 

thumb wheel switch, cabinet, etc. 
i Shipping weight 2 lb, 4 oz. 



Comparable with virtually all 220 transceivers; Cfegg, 
Midland, Cobra, etc. . - - 

The Synthesizer 220 is a 1% meter frequency synthesizer. 
Frequency is adjustable in 5 KHz steps from 220.00 MHz 
to 225,00 MHz with its digital readout thumb wheel 
switching. Transmit offsets are digitally programmed on a 
diode matrix, and can range from 100 KHz to 10 MHz- 
No additional components are necessary! 

FEATURES: 

• T2l Logic 

• Maximum offset versatility — &amly programmed to 
any IF and transmitter offset between 100 KHz and 
30 MHz in even 100 KHz increments* 

• Simple jumper wire change enables use on rigs with 18, 
9, 6 MHz transmit crystals, 

• Alt frequencies locked to one master crystal oscillator, 

• 2 pole output filter on receive line, 

• Virtually no measurable difference fn spurious outputs 
between crystal or SYN 220. 

• Lockup time typically ISO milliseconds. 

• Easily interfaced to most rigs. 

• Also available for 2 meters. 



fnmii\fm 




if engineering 



DiVrSfON Of BRQWNiAN tLECTRQNiCS CORP 
320 WATI-:R ST. / BINGHAMTON. N.Y. I39I>1 / Plume 607-723 9S74 




master charge 



T»* i^rfB 



V/S4* 



V5 L 



161 



Social E/ents 



from ps^ 2$ 

Woodbridge WiTeless, Inc. At- 
tractions will include: QSL 
bureaus— learn how ttiey work; 
FM clinic— sensitivity, devia- 
tion, and power checks; and 
CW proficiency awards— 5 
wpm and up. tndoor exhibit 
space is avaitabke for dealers. 
For information, contact Sam 
Lebowich, 9512 Sudley Manor 



Dr.. Manassas VA 22110. Talk- 
in on 146.37/,97, 147.84^.24, and 
CB ch. 1. 



MILTON PA 

JUH4 

The ?th annual MARC (Milton 
Amateur Radio Club) hamfest 
will be held on June 4, rain or 
shine, at the Allenwood Fire- 
men's Fairground located on 



US Rt. 15, 4 miles nortfi of In^ 
terstate 80. The time Is from 8 
am to 5 pm, Advanced registra- 
tion for sellers is $2.50; the gate 
is $3.00; XYLs and children free. 
There will be a flea market, an 
auction, contests, cash door 
prizes, a free portable and 
mobile FM clinic, and super- 
vised children's activities. In- 
door area availabie; food and 
beverages at reasonable 
prices. Talk-in on 37/97, 34/94. 
and 52 simplex. For further 
details, call or write Jerry 
Williamson WA3SXQ, 10 Old 
Farm Ln,, Mtlton PA 17847, 



Iron Powder and Ferrite 

TOROIDAL COR 



Wide selection - Large stock 
Fast, one-day service 
Technical data with each order 
Write for free Tech- Dot a -Flyer 



AlVII 



alEA 



_ N. 




h noih 



12033 Otsego Street, North fToTIywood, Calif, 91607 

'In Germany; Elektronikloden, Wilhelm - Mellies Str. 88 

4930 Detmold 18^ West Germany. a26 



(People who know QUAurti 

AND NEED RELIABIIITY 

(Military, indusf ry, RCC's) Demand 

Pipe Communications lor Trouble Free 
I I Touch Tone Encoders 

I H U-2.00 -*-] h* 




Code of 




Ethics 







PP-1 PP-2 

"See you in Atlanta June 3-4" 

WANT TO KNOW WHY 

Send for Descrtpttva Brochure and Complete Dealers LEst 
P.O. Box 3435, Dept. C. HoUywood, CA 90028 



P29 




(717)-742~3027. Camping and 
motels nearby. 

PORTLAND ME 
JUN 10 

The Portland Amateur 
Wiretess Association will tiold 
an amateur flea market on June 
10, 1978, at the Red Coach Grill 
In Portland, Maine, Tables will 
cost S2.&0 (shared tables are in- 
vited), and donations of $0.50 
will be taken at the door. Dona- 
tions will go toward door prizes 
which will be awarded during 
the day. The door will open at 
9:30 am. The Red Coach is 
located at Exit 8 of the Maine 
Turnpike. Talk-In on ,13/J3 or 
321.52 direct. For further infor- 
mation, write to P,A,W.A.. PO 
Box 1605, Portland ME 04104. 

WILLOW SPRINGS IL 

JUN 11 

The 21st annual ABC 
hamfesi will be held on Sun- 
day, June 11, 1978, at the Six 
Meter Club of Chicago. Inc. 
The location is southwest of 
Chicago at Santa Fe Park, 91st 
and Wolf Road. Willow 
Springs, Illinois. Advance 
registration is $1.50. It will be 
S2.00 at the gate. There will be 
a large swap row, color TV, and 
many other goodies. Picnic 
grounds and plenty of parking 
space wiii be available. Come 
see the displays in the pavilion 
and attend the AFMARS meet- 
ing. Talk-in on 146.94 FM or 
WR9ABC 37 97 {PL2A). Get ad- 
vance tickets from Val Hellwig 
K92WV, 3420 South KJlh Court. 
Cicero II 60650, 

NEWBERRY Ml 
JUN 11 

The S.P.A.R.K. annual swap 
and shop will be held from 9:00 
am to 4:00 pm at the Pentland 
Township Hall, on M-28, on 
Sunday, June 11, 1978. Plenty 
of tables and chairs will be 
available, plus a nonsmoking 
area. There will be demonstra- 
tions of hobby computers and 
how they work, an MARC dis- 
cussion, a Q.C.W.A. area for 
get-together and visitation, a 
YL and XYL craft table and a 
white elephant sate. Bring your 
QSL card for display and judg* 
ing for prize. A bake sale will be 
sponsored by S.P.A.R.K. YLs 
and XYLs. Ample parking facit* 
ities with attendants— easy 
unloading (feel free to ask a 
S.P.A.R.K, member to assist 
you). Food and beverages 
served throughout the day. Ex* 
hibitors may set up Saturday 
afternoon and evening. Securi- 
ty will be on duty In the 
building throughout Saturday 
night to eyeball. Donations will 
be $2,00 for registration and 
drawings. Tables will be $1,50 
and $2.50. All activities are 
designed for family participa- 
tion. For advance tickets, 



162 



reservations, and information, 
contact Larry Baine W8GBR, 
Box 67, Newberry Ml 49868, 
(906J-293-8651, R.J. Beach 
WeNBJ. tl5 E, Avenue ^"A", 
Newberry Ml 49868, (906)- 
293-8425. or Herb Miller 
W8SUN, RFD 1, McMillan Ml 
49853, (906)-58S'9661. 

GRANITE CITY IL 

JUN 11 

The annual hamfest of the 
Egyptian Radio Club W9AIU 
will be hefd at the club grounds 
on Sunday, June 1l» 1978, 

MONROE MJ 
JUN11 

The Monroe County Amateur 
RadJo Ctub's annual swap and 

shop will be held on Sunday, 
June 11, at the Monroe County 
Community College. Monroe, 
Michigan, from 8 am till 4 pm on 
Raisinville Road off M50. Talk- 
in on 146,13/73, $1.00 donation 
at the gate. Free tables and 
trunk sales. Plenty of refresh- 
ments. 

AKRON OH 
JUN 11 
The Goodyear Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 11th an- 
nual hamfest and family picnic 
on Sunday, June 11, at Wing- 
foot Lake Park from 10;00 am to 
6:00 pm. The park is southeast 
of Akron on County Road 87 
near Rte, 43. There wiH be five 
main prizes, plus many others, 
ample parking, shelters, picnic 
facilities, kids' play areas, and 
refreshments. Sorry, no over- 
night parking- Flea market and 
display space is free to ticket 
holders. Family donation is 
S2.60 in advance. $3.00 at the 
gate. For details, write Don 
Rogers WA8SXJ. 161 S. 
Hawkins Ave., Akron OH 44313, 
or phone (2l6)-864-3665. 

SALT LAKE CITY UT 
JUN 17 

The Utah Council of Amateur 
Radio Clubs will sponsor a 
statewide ARRL hamfest at the 
Talorsville Park in Salt Lake 
City on June 17. Activities will 
include an ARRL forum, MARS 
meetings, an ATV forum, a TTY 
forum, a radio control demon- 
stration, a VHF-UHF weak 
signal forum, an OSCAR 
demonstration, a personal 
computer forum, and a search 
and rescue forum. Also on the 
program are contests, in- 
cluding CW, transmitter 
building, antenna efficiency, 
transmitter hunts, home brew 
and treasure hunts. Other ac- 
tivities planned are dealer 
displays, swap tables, movies, 
QSL board, ladies' and kids' ac- 
tivities, a hot-air balloon demo, 
a barbecue, door prizes, two 
meter crystal swap, and an 
equipment auction. Camping, 
traitering, and motel facilities 



are close by. Preregistration is 
$3.00 for adults and $1.00 for 
kids under 13, Inquiries and pre- 
registration fees should be 
sent to the Utah Council of 
Amateur Radio Clubs, PO Box 
18563, Salt Lake City, Utah 
84118. 

PORTAGE IN 

JUN 18 

The fifth annual **Dad's Day" 
hamfest, sponsored by the 
Lake County Amateur Radio 
Ciub, N.W., IN. will be held on 
June 18 from S am till 5 pm. 
There will be food, drink, door 



prizes, and fun. It will be held at 
the Izaak Walton League picnic 
grounds in Portage, Indiana, 30 
minutes from Chicago. Take 
1-94 to Indiana 249» Portage 
exit, go north Vi mile, and turn 
right at the hamfest gate. Over- 
nite camping — no hookups. 
Talk^in on 146.52 or 147.B4/.24, 
W9LJ-WR9AMU. Tickets will be 
$2.00 at the gate or $150 in ad- 
vance. Send check to: Tickets, 
PO Box 348, Griffith IN 46319. 

BARNESVILLEPA 
JUN 18 

The Schuylkill Amateur 



Repeater Association wit! 
sponsor a hamfest on Sunday, 
June 18, 1978, rain or shine. 
Gates will open at 9:00 am. The 
hamfest will be held at 
Lakewood Park, Barnesvilla 
PA, along Route 54, 3 miles 
east of Exit 37 on Interstate 81. 
Talk-in on 147.78/18 and 146.52 
simplex. Registration is $2.00; 
XYL and children are free* 
Amusement rides, picnic 
tables, and refreshments 
available on the park grounds. 
Large indoor and outdoor flea 
market area. For more informa- 
tion, write Carl H. Zimmerman 



ALL BAND TRAP ANTENNAS ! 



-<BBIUQ^^'' 




ALL 5 SAND OPERATtON - ONLY ONE 
NEAT SMALL ANTENNA. FOR CONGESTED 
HOUSING AND APARTMENT DWELLERS! 
LIGHT. NEAT - ALMOST INVISIBLE! 





fflmj)- 



FOR ALL MAKES AMATEUR HF TRANS- 
MITTERS - TRANSREICEIVE^S - GUARAN- 
TEED FOR 2,OO0 WATTS PEP POWER 
FOR NOVICE AND ALL CLASS AMATEURS! 



COMPLETE Ready to put up wHPi 30 ft. Dacran end support cordst Wt 3 Iba., rx 5" MOLDED 

RESONANT TRAPS - j^st %^\\ch youf tr^nsm^ter to ffesired band for EXCELLENT PERFORMANCE' 

NO TUNERS OH BALUNS NEEDED! CAN BE USED IN ATTICS. TOPS OF BUILDINGS . INVERTED 
V5 IN MINIMUM SPACE, NO CENTER SUPPORT NEEDED. NO HAYWIRE HOUSE APPEARANCE 
COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED No tuning - cultino - stsldefino - measuring - JUST HANG IT. AND 
USE IT! SWR IS L2 AT RESONANCE THOUSANDS IN USE - EASIEST INSTALLATkONt 

8O-4O-20-15-1O meter bands'<'1D2 t(, vvlth 90ft. RG56U coaic -connector »Mi>{^e1 99BBU, ■ .$49.95 
40-20-15-10 m«tflr bindt— 54 tt. with 90 fi. RG58U co** - connettor -Model lOQlSU. , . - $46.95 
20-15*10 meter b«nd3-^ 26ft. wUH 90 ft. RG56U coajt * £«nne£tor .Model 100TBU ,..,,. $4795 

Send only $5.00 Cc^sh, ctt^ mo.) and pMj postman balance i^lus COD postftpfr OR SEND FULL PRICE 
FOR POST PAID DEL, IN USA fCan*da li *5.00 cKtra) or order by MAIL OR PHONE wdh Bank- 
Amerkard VISA -MASTER CHARGE -OR AM EXP. Givt nufnbflrand en. date. Ph t-30e-236-5333 
^eek days. We mhip In £-3 daym. INFLATION? PRICES MAY INCREASE - SAVE * ORDER NOW| 
INFO. AVAILABLE FROM. WESTERN ELECTRONICS Dept. A7*6 Kearnoy, Nebra^Ka. 6864T 



The only REALLY 
NEW 80-10 meter 

vertical design in 
20 years! 

Completely automatic bandswitching 80 tfiroogh 10m 

(160- 10m with opiiortal TBR-160 add-ort unit, I 

Low V.SMM, owr Mtw 40. 20. IS. A lOm Oand* plus ANY 60- 
YOOKHZ i*«nwffii Of SO 75 m NO APftENNJI tliKER HEEDEOf 
ENTIHE 26 It Itrtqttt active cm 00^40. 30. A lOm mdh tuJI 1 4 
waw* resortflntre on 15 m to* >or«:af«f tUtntimitith A lu:p«iM>r f>K 
p«rPorrnanca Groufid. rpql, ar lower msuiil-no quv^s ntvdcd- 

HiaHEST QUALITY CONSTflUCtEON & WORKMANSHIP THROJCSH- 
OUI HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOY ANQ FlQERGLASS OE- 
SIGN Comptet^ wilh 1-18 m. <Xi> tubulat mounlrng {Mst. «<i~ 
II. U inatch:Tit<i Una^ an^i Ei^Arwcior ror PL-Mft Us* any i^nilN 
ot 5a-5Zfl *o*i 

V.S.WR. at resonance^ 13:1 or less; alt bands. 
Power raling: Legal liml! SSB CW 4a-l0m; 1200 W. 
Re.R.'500W CW on 80' 75m. 

AT YOUR DEALER OH OIRECTLV FROM 



lSm trap 



80iti coil 



k^\ BUTTERNUT 



ELECTRONICS CO. b31 



ROUTE ONE DEPT. 
LAKE CRYSTAL. MN. 
PWONE 507-947-3126 

OTHER MODELS. TOO! FREE INFOflMATION 



Model HF5V-II S74»50ppi> in cont usa rsv upsi 



MN RESIDENTS AD1> TAM 



Ba^e 



163 



m 




W3EEK, RD #2, Box 580, 
Tamaqua PA 1E252* 

f BEDERfCK MD 

JUN 18 

The first annual Fredenck 
Amateur Radio Club of central 
Maryland hamfest will be held 
on Sunday, June 18 J 978, at the 
Frederick fairgrounds on East 
Patrick Street, Frederick MD, 
There will t>e prizes, exhibits, 
and demonstrations. Food and 
drink {country cooking) witi be 
available. Grounds open at 6 
am for commercial displays 
and at 8 am for general admis- 
sion (YLs and children free). 




^^^^^^^^^ 


r ^ 
ma$tm crtarge 


VISA 


-^^^^- -^^^-- -^ 


m 



STORE HOURS 

MON 9 AM 10 9 PM 
TUE 9 AM ro 6 PM 
WED 9 AM to 6 PM 
THU 9 AM !0 9 PM 
FRl 9 AM to 6 PM 
SAT 9 AM to 5 PM 




universal 

samajcur 

raoio inc 

1280 AIDA DRIVE 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 
Reynoldsburg , 43068 

all major brands 
full factory service 
antennas and towers 
competitive prices 
large inventory 
all amateur needs 



I 270 EXIT N0.41 

EAST 1.8 MILES ON 

EAST MAIN STREET (RT 40) 



Northeast Corner 
of Reynoldsburg 
Shopping Center 




oei 



111 I 



4267 



♦▼▼▼▼▼▼TTTTTTTTTT¥¥¥T¥¥?TTTT¥TTTTTTTVTT¥T» 



Main prize drawing at 2 pm. In- 
side and outside tables avail- 
able, as well as tailgating. Talk- 
in on 146,52, 13/73. 

ORCUTT CA 
JUN 18 

The Satellite Amateur Radio 
Club will hold its annual 
swap/funfest and Santa Maria 
barbeque on Sunday. June 18. 
Join us for the best steak and 
biggest hamfest in the west. 
Fantastic prizes! Swap tables 
available. Try the all-you-can- 
eat dinner for $6.00 for aduits 
and W.00 for children under 12. 
Contact Tom Geiger W2KVAy6 
at {805)^925-0398, or write to 
Swapfest, PO Box 2531. Orcutt 
CA 93454. 

JACKSONVILLE IL 

JUN 18 

*The little hamfest with a tot 
of prizes and good eyeball 
QSOs" will be held on June 18, 
1978, at the Morgan County 
Fairgrounds. Talk-In on 146.40/ 
147.00 W9T2U9, Tickets in ad- 
vance are $1.50 each or four for 
$5, For Information, write to 
JAARC, Box 571, Jacksonville, 
Illinois 62661. You need not be 
present to win. 

RAPID CITY SD 
JUL 1-2 

The annual South Dakota 
hamfest will be held on July 1 
and 2, 1978, ai Surbeck Center 
on the campus of the South 
Dakota School of Mines and 
Technology. Rapid City, South 
Dakota. There will be technical 
forums, an ARRL forum, a flea 
market, and Industrial tours. 
The grand prize will be a Ken- 
wood TS-520S; the prereg 1st ra- 
tion prize will be a Kenwood TR- 
7500. Admission is $4.50 in ad- 
vance {before June 1 ) or $5.00 at 
the door. Plan to include this on 
a vacation to the Black Hills for 
the July 4th weekend. We 
recommend early reservations 
for accommodations. For more 
information and/or assistance 
with reservations^ write to 
Black Hills ARC, Box 1014, 



73 Magazine will have a Dealer Directory section 
beginning with the August issue. 



YouT company 
name and raessue 
eau contain «s many 
as 25 words for as 
little as $150 yesirly 
(prepaid), or £15 
per month (prepaid 
quarterly). No men- 
lion of mail order 
butiness or a.rea 
code per mi tied. 




Adi will be *et In 
standard tistinE 
typography, Derec- 
toxy text and pay- 
nient mu^t reach u^ 
45 day« in advance 
of publication* For 
examiplie, ad vev tiding 
for the August issu« 
must t>t In OUT 
hands by ■! une 1 5tb^ 



Mail your directory listing to: 
DEALER DIRECTORY. PETERBO 



73 Magazine 
ROUGH NH 03458 



Rapid City SD 57709. 

CUMMINGTON MA 
JUL 8*9 

The Northern Berkshire 
Amateur Radio Club's hamiesl 
will be held on July 8th and 9th 
at the Cummington Fair 
Grounds, Cummington, Massa- 
chusetts. There will be free 
overnight camping, technical 
talks, demonslfations. and 
dealers, The flea market will 
cost ST Admission will be $4 
Of, with spouse. $6. Advanced 
tickets are S3 and S5 For infor- 
mation write: Hildy Sheer in 
WA1ZNE, 89 Greylock Terrace. 
PHtsfield MA 01201. 

INDIANAPOLIS IN 
JUL 9 

The Indianapolis hamfest 
will be held on Sunday, July 9, 
1978. The gates will open from 
6:00 am to 4:30 pm. The place is 
the Marion County Fair- 
grounds, S,E. corner, in India* 
napolis, Indiana. There will be 
professional commercial ex- 
hibiting, a covered flea market, 
and an unhmited outside flea 
market. Overnight camping 
facilities with hookup are 
available. For information, 
write to Indianapolis Hamfest, 
PO Box 1002, Indianapolis IN 
4620a 

ESSEX MT 
JUL 15 16 

The International Glacier- 
Waterton Hamfest will be held 
on July 15-16, 1978, in the West 
Glacier Area* Montana. The 
location will be at the Three 
Forks Campground, 10 miles 
east of Essex MT on U.S. High- 
way 2. Registration begins at 
9:00 am MST. 

BOWLING GREEN OH 
JUL 16 

The Wood County, Ohio, t4th 
annual Ham-a^Rama will be 
held on Sunday, July 16, at the 
fairgrounds in Bowling Green 
(just off 1*75). Gates open at 
10:00 am. Admission and park- 
ing are free. Tables are 
available for S3.00 or 6-foot 
spaces for $2.00 (advance table 
or space rental to dealers only). 
Trunk-sale space and food will 
also be available. There will be 
a main prize drawing and tots of 
door prizes. K8TIH talk-In on 
146.52 simplex. Tickets are 
$1.50 in advance. $2.00 at the 
door. Write to Wood County 
Amateur Radio Club, c^o Eric 
Willman, 14118 Bishop Road, 
Bowling Green, Ohio 43402. 

MARSHALL MO 
JUL 23 

The Indian Foothills Amateur 
Radio Club, Inc, will hold its 
third annual hamfest on July 
23, 1978, in an air-conditioned 

Conrfnued on pag& 175 



164 



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TREVOSE, PA. 19047 

Telephone: Tol! Free: 

(2 1 5) 357- 1 400 1 800-523-8998 

(215)757-5300 



H8 



Cushcraft Does It Again! 

their new tribander is a winner 



David B. Perrm KIOPQ 
RFD M, Tyler DisL 
Conioocook NH 03229 

Now that we (my family 
and my beam) have 
survived the winter, it is 
time to rebuild, replace, or 
at least discuss putting up 
a new antenna. For those 
on the low bands, this may 
mean a new beam. 
Whether you buy or build 
depends on many things 
— such as amount of time, 
availability of necessary 
antenna designing equip- 
ment, mechanical knowl- 
edge of assembling a 
beam, and hardware and 
machining equipment to 
make brackets and ele- 
ment and boom supports. 
A year ago, 1 found 
myself in this posi- 
tion: My four-year-old 
three-element tribander, 
which had been up for two 
years at my QTH. had 
transformed itself into a 
rotatable dipole by 
winter's end. What was left 
of it could not handle more 
than 1 kW PEP. Thinking of 
alternatives, I quickly 



- ISfli - 
-Kkn- 



Fig. 1 



dispelled the possibility of 
separate beams — they 
would be too expensive, 
my 40-foot se!f*supporting 
tower wouldn't handle the 
mass, and I didn't want to 
create a landmark, just a 
good antenna for 20, 15, 
and 10 meters. Although I 
would like to try a quad, I 
still don't believe that a 
quad can last as well as a 
beam. (I suspect, though, 
that it will outperform a 
beam while it's up and 
working.) 

Since I've had three tri- 
band beams, which were 
up forty feet and sup- 
ported in a variety of ways 
at three locations, since 
1961, I knew what I 
wanted. The new beam 
would have to meet the 
following requirements: 

1. reasonable price; 

2. more rugged boom- 
to-mast and boom-to- 
element supports; 

3. able to withstand the 
New Hampshire ice, wind, 
and snow; 

4. uncomplicated 
design; 

5. use of locally 
available hardware; 

6. ability to adjust swr 
on each band separately; 

7. single line feed; 

8. competitive specifi- 
cations with other triband 
beams; 



9. 2 kW PEP power 

capability (may be needed 
someday); 

10, good performance 
on all three bands; 

11, ability to stay up 
and together; 

12. good customer ser- 
vice when needed. 

The decision not to de- 
sign and build a triband 
beam was easy— I didn't 
have enough time. There 
are things other than anten- 
nas in life and, from what 
the XYL and IRS say, other 
than ham radio, too. 

Cushcraft has designed a 
four-element triband beam 
with impressive specifica- 
tions, complete with balun 
and a reasonable price. I 
compared and reviewed 
specifications and then 
visited the new Cushcraft 
plant in Manchester NH to 
check the various aspects 
of design and construction 
which concerned me. The 
beam looked good on 
paper. The construction 
was as rugged as more ex- 
pensive antennas and it 
was simpler-all standard 
parts and proven ideas. 
The decision was made. 

My new Cushcraft 
ATB 34 (3 bands, 4 
elements) arrived by UPS in 
early September. The 
delivery man must have 
been tired — he claimed it 



was over fifty pounds. 

However, the manufac- 
turer had assured me that 
the total package was de- 
signed realizing weight and 
size limitations in shipping. 

Taking a tip from 
building kits, when 
I opened the package, the 
first thing I did was 
check for all the parts, to 
the last bolt — no problem. 
Then I made the assembly 
area off limits to anyone 
without a ham license to 
avoid losing parts. The 
traps come not fully 
assembled, so you can get 
a look at this part of the 
design. With my other 
beams, the traps had been 
just bumps, keeping the 
design a total secret. 

Assembly of this 18-foot 
boom antenna is no prob- 
lem, but I do have a few 
comments. The instruc- 
tions say that you don't 
need a tape measure to 
assemble it. I say you 
do— who can make an an- 
tenna without a tape mea- 
sure? Make certain that 
you read, and understand, 
the instructions before you 
begin assembly. One short- 
coming is that the various 
pieces for each of the 
elements are not color cod- 
ed, packaged separately, 
or in any other way kept 
separated from other ele- 



166 



ment pieces. It's confusing, 
so first check each trap 
(they are coded), measure 
all element pieces for each 
element, and check these 
lengths with the parts list 
The parts list does tell you 
the length and diameter for 
each part of each element 
Once the pieces were 
sorted so that I knew which 
element t was assembling, 
everything went together 
fairly smoothly. When the 
elements were finally on 
the boom, 1 made certain 
that they were all in the 
same plane by eyeballing 
the elements from the end 
of the boom. I figured out 
the placement of the 
boom-to-mast support by 
attaching a rope near the 
center of the boom, lifting 
the antenna off the ground, 
and adjusting the rope to 
find the exact center of 
gravity. The boom^to-mast 
plate was centered at this 
point. Next, I carefully 
leveled the entire antenna 
and adjusted this plate to 
be perpendicular to the 



driven element by using a 
small level. Before getting 
the antenna to the top of 
the tower, check to see 
that the U-bolts and 
V^blocks for the mast will 
all line up and fit through 
their holes in the boom-to- 
mast plate, A few taps on 
the U-bolts with a soft- 
faced persuader (mallet) 
should do it. 

With the beam com* 
pletely assembled, con- 
nect an swr bridge at the 
balun and connect the 
length of RG-e/U to your 
exciter. Lean the beam, 
with the boom vertical (or 
close to it), up against your 
tower or house. Have the 
reflector supported off the 
ground on a couple of 
wooden chairs. Now, go 
get a beer and call your 
friends. Load the rig on 
your favorite portion of 10 
meters, and adjust the 
length on each side of the 
driven element, making it 
equal to the first set of 
traps, until the swr is as low 
as it will go. tSee Fig. 1.) 



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Usually, the length wilt 
be close, but you can get 
the swr closer to 1:1 if you 
try. Then load up your rig 
on 1 5 meters and adjust the 
length of the driven ele- 
ment between the two 
traps. Make sure that the 
element sections on each 
side of the boom are ad- 
justed evenly. Next, load 
up on 20 meters and adjust 
the length of the driven ele* 
ment beyond the second 
trap to the end of the ele- 
ment Co back and check 
the swr on each band, and 
then check all mechanical 
and electrical connections. 
Now you are ready to in- 
stall the beam in the air. 

At 42 pounds, this beam 
is not light, nor is it small, 
so don't try walking it up 
your tower, I raised it using 
a homemade gin pole and 
tied it off so I could attach 
it to the mast and not have 
to support the weight of 
the antenna. It went up 
more easily than I ex* 
pected, but that was 
because I forgot to invite 



Murphy. When raising any 
antenna, think safety — it's 
not worth the risk not to. 

Once this beam was up, I 
realized in short order that 
it would outperform any of 
my previous beams. The 
directivity is considerably 
sharper. Even at 8000 miles 
or better, a swing of 20^ 
will cancel DX. The front- 
to-back ratio, at around 25 
dB, and front-to-side ratio 
are excellent . , . ah, to be 
able to swing the antenna 
and QSB the QRM without 
QSYing. The beam is at a 
modest height, but it 
outperforms my wire 
antenna at fifty feet by 30 
dB on receive. This beam 
works very well, though I 
have no figures, since my 
reference antenna isn't 
isotropic and it wouldn't 
be fair. 

At this point I question 
whether a larger triband 
beam would be worth- 
while. Perhaps Til try one 
this summer, just for the 
fun of it. when I finish the 
90-foot tower. ■ 



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New from island Antennas . . . 

A 20 M BEAM FOR 
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168 



10-15-20 METERS 





HF VERTICALS 
BY CUSHCRAFT 

CiiSftcrafl's new muRibanij veriical antenna syslems tiave been optimized 

lof Wide operatiT^ bandwidth and pf ov*de the it^w angle ot radiation 

wlnich »S esseniial lof long-liaul OX communications on the hi0i- 

trequency amateur bands T^e hi^h O if ap^ wnicti ^vere designed 

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1 0*1 5"'20'-40 METERS are manufactured from filamen^wound hberglass for minimum 

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maximum performance vwith hmrted space choose a 

CushcraJr multiband vertical all models may be roof or 

ground mounted on a 1 % " - 1 %" (32 - 48 mmj rriasi 

10-15-20-40-80 METERS 



ATV-3 Cushr rai4 K ATV-3 mutttband 

vertrca! provrdes law VSWR operation for 
both SSB and CW on 10. 1 5. and 20 meters, 
Matched to 50 oJims: riuill-'n connector 
mates with sianrlaid PL 259 Starnless-sleel 
nardwaFe is used for aCi electrical connections 
The ATV-3 IS a compact tSfi inches (4 2 
meters) tall Rated al 2000 watts PEP 




VSWR 



ATY-3/ATV'* ^ ATV- J 



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ATV'*4 Th*? Cushnraft ATV-4 fouf band 

vertical antenna has been optimfzed for wide 
operating bandwidth on 10 15. 20 and 40 
metafs SWR is less than 2 1 ovai the CW 
and SSB segments oM 1 5 and 30 The 
21 BWR bandwidtti on 40 meters is 
appcoxtmaiety 240 kHz may be quickly and 
eastty adjusted to tavor any part nt fhe band 
Coaxia! titting takes 50-ohm rfans"iission line 
with PL 259 connector Overall heigh! . 233 
mches (5 9 melers), Rated at 3000 watts PFP 




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AT V-5 Tfie ATV'5 trapped vertical 
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tive band operaNon on 80 through 10 
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Svwn uiiHJwtdth wjii! Liu-ohm Petruir e is 1 
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Washington Court House OH 43160 



The S-Meter Bender 

W7DND's magic antenna 



U 



nique means one 
of a kind. Many 
things are loosely called 
unique, but I believe that 



this antenna is really one of 
a kind- It belongs to Tom 
Erdmann W7DND of Brem- 
erton, Washington, 




Although the antenna is 
usually pointed down the 
west coast, once in a while 
Tom turns it to the east. 
When he does, many an 
S-meter swings to the right 
toward the pin on 40 



DRJVEM ELCUEMT 



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meters. 

A great many hams have 
asked about the antenna, 
and, to some, Tom has sent 
photos. Most of them, how- 
ever, don't really have a 
clear conception of what 
the array really is — only 
what it does to their 
S-meters, I have, therefore, 
asked Tom for photos and 
a clear description of the 
antenna, and this will give 
you all the information you 
need. 

Basically, it is a pair of 
phased vertical antennas 
with a pair of parasitic 
reflectors, spaced about 
65' apart broadside, with 
the reflectors 20' behind 
the driven pair. 

Fig. 1 shows the circuit 

information. The antenna 
was originally voltage fed, 
and the box shown in the 
photos contains the tuner 
for protection from the 
weather. Lately, however, 
Tom has changed to cur- 
rent feed, thus eliminating 
the tuner, This circuit is 
shown in Fig. 2. 

He has added six ele- 



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fig, 1. 40 meter four-element vertical beam, voltage fed. 



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TO THIS 

VERTICAL 




Tom Erdmanr}, whh or\e 40 meter vertical mounted on the 
corner of the boom clearty sfiown. 



INSULATOR 

DO HOT cofiHCCt Mrf tms PomT 



Fig. 2. 40 meter four*element vertical beam, current fed. 



t70 



ments on 15 meters, and 
this array is shown in Fig. 3. 

Tom is shown standing 
beside his creation, which 
will give you a feeling of its 
size. 

The boom is made of 2 
X 4s, was built in 1961, and 
has gone through winds up 
to 85 miles per hour. The 
array weighs about 900 
pounds and is supported 
from the top of the 32' 
telephone pole by ten 
nylon ropes. At the bottom, 
it rests on a bearing, which 
Tom keeps well greased. 

It is rotated by hand and 
has a 12' 2" X 3" wooden 
piece which serves both as 
achock to prevent rotation 
in the wind and as a handle 
to raise up and rotate the 
array. 

It is not likely that many 
hams will care to build 
such a heavy boom for an 
antenna, but the same prin- 
ciples used here can be ap- 
plied to wire and masting 
arrays in a fixed position- 

This will be good news 
for those who cannot find 
the space or energy for 
buried ground radials- 
Since the connecting wire 
is a half wave, it acts as a 
counterpoise for each 
antenna, completing the 
array. 

You have probably 
noticed that the 
photographs show four 
elements in each of the 15 
meter beams. This was the 
way the array was original- 
ly set up. However, the 
angle was too low, so Tom 



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The water in the background is Puget Sound. The beam is pointed south and the camera is 
facing south. The four 15 meter verticals shown have been changed to three fsee text). 

removed one of the direc- 
tors. Thus, there are three 
elements in the text and 
the drawings 

His new array will be 
four vertical three-element 
beams on 15 meters- 

He is planning to remove 
the four 40 meter antennas 
and replace them with two 
more three-element 15 
meter arrays, making 12 
elements on 15 meters, 
which is now his favorite 
band. 

The 15 meter antennas 
are half-wave verticals 
voltage fed at the bottom. 






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Fig. 3. T5 meter six-element vertical beam, half-wave end- 
fed elements. 



Close view of a forty meter vertical showing how they are 
mounted on standoff insulators. 



171 




This photo was taken from the roof of Tone's home. The 
camera is fadr^geast, with the boom facing south. The box 
contains the tuning unit to protect it from the weather The 
ten nylon tmes supporting the boom are shown in this 

photo. 




Close-up showing 12' 2 x 3s, which prevent rotation by 

the wind and which are used to turn the boom by hand. 




The bearmg is kept well greased and supports the entire array with the aid of the ten nylon 
fines. 



If you look closetv in one 
of the under-the-boom 
shots, you can see the 
quarter-wave stub used to 
feed the 15 meter 
antennas. 

The manner of support 
for the 40 meter aluminum 
verticals is shown in a 
close-up. 

This array is about 3' off 
the ground, and there is no 
ground connection, nor are 
there any ground radials. 
The horizontal wire be- 
tween the two antennas is 
the counterpoise system. 

Tom refers to the anten- 
na as an "upside down bob- 
tail/' and there is a great 
similarity between this 
antenna and a full bobtail 

The gain is probably in 
the neighborhood of 8 dB. 
The angle is low and the 
beam width is narrow, 
making the antenna better 
for DX than a single ver- 
tical or even a yagi beam, 
unless the beam is at least 
a half wave high and three 



172 



elements. 

Of course, one of the 
chief advantages is elimi- 
nation of the need for a 
tower, 

You may notice that 
there is moss on some of 
the 2 X 4s after 16 years of 
use. 

The coil used for the 

voltage-fed version in Fig. 1 
has 17 turns spaced 3/16'' 
and Is 3-1/4" in diameter. 
Since there is high voltage 
across the coil, the capaci- 
tor spacing should be the 
same as in the capacitor in 
your tank circuit The 
capacity is about .001 uF. 
The horizor^tal wires in 
the reflector are not con- 
nected at the center. 

The lead from the coax is 
tapped for a 50-Ohm 
match, and the capacitor is 
tuned for maximum volt- 
age at resonance at the 
feed point Tune for max- 
imum brilliance in a 
1/4-Watt neon bulb. There 
is no ground at the anten- 
na, since the shield of the 
coax furnishes a ground at 
the transmitter. 

Tom's original antenna 
was made of 32' bamboo 
poles with #14 wire 
attached as radiators, but 
it is now made of alu- 
minum masting. This may 
give you some ideas. The 
supporting pole is IT high. 
The nylon ropes are fas- 
tened five to each side. 

The most notable fea- 
ture of this antenna is the 
complete lack of n^^A for 
ground radials or counter- 
poise. 

It would be rather easy 
to make a fixed array with 
pipe supports for the four 
antennas and stretch the 
horizontal wires between 
the supports three feet 
above the ground, so you 
could mow the yard under 
them. 

The complete antenna 
would take an area of 65' 
X 20', which isn't too hard 
to get in a yard, tf you live 
in a corner of the USA, the 
antenna could be slanted 
across the country for com- 







^£.^ 



A v/ew ifom under the boom, with the camera fadng north. 







Qt/arter-wave stub at the bottom of one of the 15 meter elements. Notice the moss on the 

2 X 4 at the upper left 



plete coverage with no 
rotation. 

Tom said that he noticed 
no difference in results be- 
tween the voltage feed and 
the current feed. 

All horizontal sections 
are #14 wire. They are out 
of phase and do nothing 
for the signal. The vertical 
sections are self-support- 
ing aluminum and are in 
phase. 

Tom sent me a tape 



which he received from 
Graham Knight, a listener 
in Aberdeen, Scotland. The 
signal was quite good on 
40, even though the beam 
was headed at 90°, which is 
straight east, and Scotland 
is about 25° from Bremer- 
ton It would have been 
much better if the beam 
had been headed toward 
Scotland. 

They say a picture is 
worth ten thousand words, 



so I have used photos and 
diagrams for most of my 
explanation. I hope this 
will interest many hams 
who will see that there are 
ways to achieve results 
other than the most usual 
and most expensive ways. 
An antenna is the cheap- 
est way to get a good signal 
out, and it also works on 
receive, which is not true 
of a linear. So plan a little 
and save a lot.B 



173 



Amazingly Simple 
Log Periodic Antenna 

an 8-1 b. mini LP for 20m 



Photo by Dennis Lopez 



Ted Robinson KIQAR 

General Deiivery 
Block Island RI 02807 



Experimenting around 
with some mobile 
whips, I found that four 
pairs of them on a lOV? 
foot boom could give 
usable directivity using log 
periodic feed. This antenna 
weighed 8 lbs., about half 
as much as the smallest 
commercial 20 meter 
beam. 



While the yagi is the 
most popular way to go, 
for an ultrasmall antenna, 
the LP seems better. It is 
broadbanded, covering all 
of 20, which is something a 
miniature yagi couldn't 
even begin to do. Unlilce 
the yagi, the LP is tolerant 
of super close spacing, los- 
ing only 1-2 dB, Finally, the 
LP's all-driven configura- 
tion avoids the problem of 
insufficient coupling be- 
tween the tiny mobile whip 

elements. 

Construction is straight- 
forward. Eight solid-core 




fiberglass fishing-pole 
blanks, 6' long, 3/8'' at the 

base, and tapering to 1/8" 
at the tip, are obtained 
from a tackle supply house 
(these dimensions are not 
critical). Starting at the tip, 
wind #20 enameled wire, 



with adjacent turns 
touching, for about 18" 

For the next 18", the pitch 
gradually increases to 1/4" 
between turns. At this 
point, switch to #18 wire, 
soldering the connection. 
Pitch increases smoothly 



RESONANT 
FREQUENCIES 

IS SUNii 



t«5ltfM| 



iSBUMt 



i2.r 



i/«ifi 



50 e COAX 




iQlt^id. 



i 



Fig. 1. 20 meter minhlog periodic beam. 



174 



from 1/4" to 3/4" as the 
winding is continued to the 
base. Using a grid-dip oscil- 
lator, add or subtract turns 
from the tip to resonate to 
the nearest of the follow- 
ing frequencies: 12.7, 13.6, 
14 5, and 15.5 MHz. Mak- 
ing sure to always wind in 
the same direction and 
varying the amount of wire 
appropriately, fabricate all 
eight whips with two reso* 
nant to each frequency. 
The easiest way to wind is 
rotate the pole and feed 



wire onto it. 

The boom is made from 
6' of 5/8" aluminum with 3' 
of 1/2" aluminum tubing 
telescoped in either end. 
Pairs of holes the same size 
as the pole bases are 
drilled in the boom for ele- 
ment mounting, observing 
the following spacing: 45", 
42", and 39". An antenna 
feeder supported on top of 
the boom, consisting of 
#16 wire spaced 2", com- 
pletes the array. 

Varying this spacing will 



vary the impedance of the 
antenna. Normally a 
75-Ohm matching section 
into 5CM3hm line will give 
good results. Remember 
that adjacent elements get 
fed out of phase and that 
the tower frequency whips 
go with the wider spacings. 
Feed is to the high- 
frequency end, and a 12'' 
stub is attached to the low- 
frequency end of the 
antenna feeder. 

With such a small anten- 
na, it was quite easy to get 



it up 65 feet on a mast 
made from scrap pipe, 
which was clamped to the 
side of the house next to a 
window for hand rotation. 
With this setup, measure- 
ments indicated an f/b of 
5^ dB, an f/s of 10 dB, and 
a low swr across the band. 
Gain was calculated to be 
4-5 dB. Compared with 
other beams on the air, per- 
formance seemed to bear 
this out. A bonus was an 
apparent 20 dB f/b for 
power-line noise. ■ 



Social E/ents 



from p^gE 164 

multipurpose building at the 
Saiine County Fairgrounds in 
Marshal), Missouri. There will 
be flea markets for the OM and 
XYL {tables— $2.00 for first 
table; $1.00 for each additional 
table). Many prizes are to be 
awarded and there will be old 
and new equipment displays. 
Campgrounds (no connections 
for utilities) are avaiiable. The 
timetable is 8:00 am— registra- 
tion; 8:00 am to 10:00 am— 
breakfast rolls and coffee; 
11:30 am — lunch— all you can 
eat; 2:30 pm — drawing. Tickets 
are $2.00 in advance, $2.50 at 
the door. For information and 
tickets, write James H. Little 
WDOBPG, 405 East Rosehill, 
Marshall. Missouri 65340. Talk- 
in on 52, 28/88, 

SALEM OH 
JUL 23 

The Kent State Salem 
Amateur Radio Club will hold a 
hamfest on July 23, 1978. The 
door prize will be a Ten*Tec 
#540 transceiver, courtesy of 
KenMar Industries; there will 
be many others for the whole 
family as well as a hot air 
balloon, a ramp for wheel 
chaJrs, and plenty of free park- 
ing- Wives and kids under 12 
free, XYL drawing and recrea- 
tion facilities available on 
t>eautiful campus. Open at 9 
am; main drawing at 3 pm. Ad- 
mission: $2,00; flea market: 
$1.00; tables: $5.00, Talk-in on 
146.10%70. For information, 
write W8JPG 147,27, Milhoan 
Electronics, 1128 West State 
Street. Salem OH 44460; 
(216>337-9275. 

IKDIANAPOLIS IN 
JUL 26 

The IEEE Computer Society 
of Central Indiana and the Cen- 
tral Indiana section of IEEE will 



sponsor the third annual Indy 
Microcomputer Show on 
Wednesday, July 26, 1978, from 
11 :00 am to 9:00 pm at the Holi- 
day Inn located at 1-70 and 
Shadeland Avenue in India- 
napolis. There will be exhibits, 
demonstrations, and technical 
seminars addressing the 
engineering, industrial, scien- 
tific, business, and personal 
applications of microcomputer 
systems, 

OKLAHOMA CITY OK 
JUL 28-30 

Central Oklahoma Radio 
Amateurs will present Ham 
Holiday '78 on July 28, 29, and 
30, in the Lincoln Plaza Forum, 
4345 North Lincoln Boulevard, 
Oklahoma City. Preregjstraiion 
closes July 14 with a fee of 
$3.00; $4.00 at the door. Non- 
commercial flea market tabies 
are free in the ten-thousand- 
square-foot flea market area. 
Commercial exhibitors contact 
K5M8 at (405)-787-9545 or 
787-9292. Technical programs 
are scheduled throughout the 
hamfest. Many prizes will be 
given away, including a special 
preregistration prize. Mail 
preregistrations to Ham Holi- 
day ^78, PO Box 14604, 
Oklahoma City OK 73113, 

FTTUTHILLAZ 
JUL 28-30 

The Amateur Radio Council 
of Arizona witi present the an- 
nual Ft, TuthJII Hamfest on Ju- 
ly 28, 29, and 30, 1978. Come on 
out in the cool pine country of 
Arizona, and join our western 
barbeque, prize drawings, and 
tech sessions. For further 
details or pre-registration 
forms, contact PO Box 11642, 
Phoenix A2 85061. 

KINGSFORO Mf 
JUL 29-30 
The 30th annual U.P, 



hamfest* cosponsored by the 
Great Northern Repeater 
Association and the Mich-A- 
Con ARC of Iron Mountain- 
Kingsford, Michigan, will be 
held on Saturday, July 29, and 
Sunday, July 30. 1978. at the 
Dickinson County Armory on 
M-95 in Klngsford, Michigan. 
Registration will begin at 9:00 
am on both days. Tickets are 
$2-50 in advance and S3.00 at 
the door. Saturday night ban- 
quet tickets are S6.50, and 
reservations should be re- 
ceived by July 1. Dally activities 
include: U.P. net meeting, 
U.P.R.A. meeting, YL net 
meeting, ARRL director's 
meeting, computers, DX and 
contests, slow scan, satellite, 
RTTY, moon bounce, FAX, 2 m 
SSS, a swap and shop, and a 
special discussion on "Anten- 
nas—Legal Aspects" by 
George Goldstone W8AP, vice- 
director of the Great Lakes Divi- 
sion. Planned family activities 
will be held both days. Plenty of 
parking is available. Prizes 
galore? Talk-in on 146.25/-85 
and 3922. For information, 
write UPHAMFEST 78, Box 
2056, Kmgsfofd, Michigan 
49801 . 

HOUSTON TX 

AUG 4-6 

On August 4. 6, and 6, 1978, 
the Houston Echo Society will 
host the annual Texas VHF-FM 
Society Summer Convention in 
the Galleria Plaza Hotel, just 
off interstate loop 610 at 
Westheimer Rd. While primari- 
ly devoted to the VHF-FM spec- 
trum, attractions will also in- 
clude microprocessors/micro- 
computers, the annual Texas 
champion hidden transmitter 
hunt, OSCAR communications, 
and much more, covering all 
phases of amateur radio. There 
will be forums conducted by 
both the ARRL and the FCC. A 
banquetydance is planned for 
Saturday night. The featured 
speaker will be William A. 
Tynan W3X0. editor of "The 
World Above 50 MHz'' column 



in QST. Exhibitors will be 
displaying their wares all day 
Saturday and Sunday, Several 
excellent prizes will also be 
given away. The main prize will 
be the choice of an HF rig or an 
ailmode VHF rig, with the sec- 
ond prize being the rig which is 
not given away as the main 
prize. There will also be a 
preregistration prize as well as 
hourly door prizes. More infor- 
mation can be obtained by 
writing to: FM Society Summer 
Convention, PO Box 717, Tom- 
ball, Texas 77375. 

MACKS INN ID 
AUG 4 6 

The 46th Annual WIMU 
(Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, 
Utah) Hamfest will be held on 
August 4, 5, and 6, 1978, at 
Macks Inn. Idaho, 25 miles 
south of West Yellowstone, 
Montana. Talk-in on 146*34/94 
and 3935. Advance registration 
is $a00 for adults and S2.00 for 
children, before July 2Sth, 1978. 
Late/regular registration is 
S7.00 and S2.50. There will be a 
special prize drawing for 
preregistration. Please send 
preregistration to: WIMU 
Hamfest, 3645 Vaughn Street, 
Idaho Falls, Idaho 83401; phone 
(208}-522^9568. 

PETOSKEY Ml 
AUG 5 

The 3rd annual Straits Area 
Radio Ctub swap and shop will 
be held on Saturday, August 5, 
at the Emmet County Fair- 
grounds, Charlevoix Avenue, 
Petoskey, Michigan, from 9 am 
to 3 pm. Talk-in on 146,52, Food 
services, prfzes. Tickets will be 
$1.50 at the door. Campsites 
nearby. For information, write 
to SARC in care of W81ZS, Box 
416. Pellston Ml 49769. 

JACKSONVILLE FL 
AUG 5-6 

The Jacksonville Hamfest 
Association is happy to an- 
nounce the 5 th annual 

Continued on page 2f3 



175 




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The DF is battery-powered, can be used with accessory 
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4) 100 rt. 8 wire Rotor Cable 

5) 2PL259— List S465 for 
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Be/ore you buy your next Ham Radio "STOP** and take itme io 
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Come to ABC Com mun teat ions today for the best solution to your particular communication 

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S89a5a 



DENTROfSI MT-3000A 
Deluxe Tuner S349.50. 

DENTRON ieO-10 AT (not shown} 
Super Tuner Si 29.50. 












n #P4VF mm aW* 








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Alias Transceiver 21 5X (not shown) 

160 thru 1&M$679. 




ICOM Transceiver 2M FM 
SS8 IC211 S749, 



ICOM Transceiver 2M FM 
IC22S$299. 





ICOM Transceiver 2M FM 
IC 245 $499, 



ICOM 




YAESU HF SSB 
FT^IOI E. 160 thru lOM $799. 



Y/^dgy 





YAESU rr-22lR 
2 meter FM-SSB $688. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



A 46 



17550 15TH AVE. N-E, •SEATTLE. WASH, 98155 • iWB} 364-8300 



We also handle WiJson, Cushcraft, Hy* 
Gain. Antenna Spec»aHsts, KL^^etc. 
Attention Washington rAsidents: Conne 

on in for excellent service in our com- 
plete Communications Repair Shop. 



Write or call for SPECIAL tower, rotor, 
antenna package! Tri-Ex, Rohn, Wilson 
Towers. S+iipping Info: F.O.B. Seattle via 
UPS, truck, or parcel post. 




TO PLACE ORDER 

CALL TOLL FREE 

IN STATE OF WASH, 

1 (300^ 562-7625 

V\^sti. rds. add sales tax 



Other locations: (Walk-in customers only) • Bellevue - 12001 N- E. 12th • Everett - 6920 Evergreen Way • Open Mon, thru Sat 



177 



Disguised Birdhouse 

Vertical 



-give the birds a hot foot 
with this secret antenna 



Ijeland R Agard KSLUW 

Route 5, Box 735 
SiBTkviUe MS 397S9 



You've heard of the 
''bird cage antenna/' 
the 'Veriical antenna/' and 
the invisible "apartment 



dwelter*s antenna," but the 
antenna 1 am about to de- 
scribe is fust the thing you 
need if you live in an apart- 
ment or a rental house where 
the landlord will not let you 
put up an outside antenna. 
Also, if the sight of large 
antenna arrays automatically 



O O 



o o o 



□ 



-WOODEitI D-aw^LING 



mXlQeii eK)WEL«H6 FL^CEP iMStOC 
SPLI^II Anf> V BASt Af^ti TOP 
FOtt SUPPORT 




«W.BXII/2tn BOi.TS a HUTS 



SMfVOHT ST4MC 



flADIAiS IMX 




PVC PIPE SLIPPED OVER m*St 
fist UiSULATOfl 



»aSL CLJllli>5 






TO RJl|}J4L SrStEM 



Rg. L 



makes your neighbors^ tele- 
vision sets start acting up and 
you are tired of those an- 
noying phone calls every time 
you start operating, maybe 
what you need is a disguised 
antenna that is a super DX 
antenna that also puts out a 
respectable stateside signal. 

I am sure that you have 
heard the old saying that a 
vertical antenna radiates 
equally poorly In all dlrec- 
tionsj but you may be in For a 
surprise if you have never 
used one. The vertical is an 
amazing antenna and outper- 
forms my dipole at forty feet 
on alt occasions and with 
some very startling results. 
This is not the place to run 
down my log and list ail the 
DX stations that I worked 
with this antenna, but 1 will 
say that my two-element 40 
meter yagi is still in the box 
in the garage. I used this 
antenna in the 1976 sweep- 
slakes and ran up a score of 
over 1 00,000 on forty meters 
to win my stale. It seems to 
work great for short or fong 
distances, and the point 1 am 
trying to make is, "Try it; 
youll likeitl" 

My antenna was con- 
structed for forty meters, but 
the antenna can be made for 



20, 15, or 10 meters, also. 
Simply cut the length of the 
vertical radiator to a quarter 
wavelength for the center of 
the band you want to work 
and cut the radials this same 
length plus five percent. 

The fact that a purple mar- 
tin birdhouse appears at the 
top of the vertical is the main 
camouflage system. For all 
practical intents and purposes 
(as far as your neighbors are 
concerned), this is simply a 
birdhouse supported by a 
metal pole. Only you know 
that it is really an antenna for 
a ham rig. 

Every one knows about 
purple martins. These are 
those wonderful little birds 
that spend spring and summer 
in the United Stales, raising 
their families of little purple 
martins. While they are here, 
their most beneficial con- 
tribution is the fact that each 
day they eat their weight in 
insects, and they are about 
the best mosquito eradlcators 
known to mankind. There is 
no use ruining the ecology 
using pesticides when the 
purple martin will do the job 
much better and cheaper^ 
while producing no unwanted 
side effects. After the purple 
martins have raised their 
families, they will return to 
central America during the 
fall and spend the winter 
there. Now the truly amazing 
fact is that, in the spring, the 
same birds will return to the 
same nesting place to raise 
another family, and the 
young that were born last 
year will return to the place 
of their birth to raise their 
families. In a couple of years, 
you will have a colony of 
purple martins that will keep 
your neighborhood insect 
free. About the only thing 
that purple martins require is 
a clear flyaway zone around 
the house they are nesting in* 
This works out very nicely 
because the same objects that 
annoy the purple martins will 
soak up rf like a sponge. 

In the construction of the 
vertical antenna, the alu- 
minum used was purchased at 
the local TV shop and is 
known as locking TV mast. It 



178 



is a painted aluminum tubing 
and cost $2.95 for a ten-foot 
section, I bought forty feet^ 
cut three feet off one section, 
and joined it with three other 
sections to make a 33-foot 
vertical f put a wooden 
doweling rod about a foot 
long at each joint, the base, 
and the top. The doweling 
was fastened to the mast with 
#8 X V/i' bolts and nuts 
through the mast and 
doweling Two bolts were 
used at the top and bottom 
of each joinL Solder lugs can 
be used under each boit and 
braid strapping used to 
jumper each joint to provide 
excellent electrical connec- 
tions. 

The type of purple martin 
house that you use is, of 
course^ optional. These 
houses are advertised in Sears 
and other national mail-order 
catalogs and, in most in- 
stances, can be obtained 
locally. They come in both 
metal and wooden models. 

The birdhouse is best 
attached to the top of the 



vertical using a floor-type 
pipe flange and a piece of 
doweling material about 18 
inches long. The wooden 
dowel J of course, will insulate 
the birdhouse for the an- 
tenna. 

Now here is the secret of 
how the birdhouse antenna 
works like an antenna and 
not like an rf choke. You will 
have to put in a ground 
system of quarter wavelength 
radials. These should go from 
the base of the vertical and 
stretch out like the spokes of 
a wagon wheel. Now I know 
you have heard of all the guys 
who just stick a ground rod in 
the ground and their vertical 
antennas work just fine. 
Don't you believe it! The 
ground rod is simpiy for 
tightning protection. Forty 
meter rf energy will only 
penetrate the earth to a depth 
of a couple of inches, so you 
must use a ground system, 
but this should be no trouble. 
A minimum of two radials 
will workj butj like other 
things, the rule is: the more. 



the better. Realistically, a 
minimum of four radials 
should be used, and eight will 
work better. Equal currents 
flow in the vertical and the 
radials, so the radials are a 
must. 

On the radials^ I had good 
luck with a shovel making a 
slit in the ground, pushing the 
radial in the slit, and then 
walking over the ground to 
cover the radial up. Others 
have had good results with 
simply laying the radials on 
top of the grass and letting 
the grass grow up over the 
radials. When the grass is cut, 
it forms a mulch layer over 
the radials, and, in about a 
month, the radials are com- 
pletely covered. 

The quarter wavelength 
vertical radiator has an 
impedance of about 30 to 35 
Ohms but will present a good 
match to 52-Ohm RG-58/U 
coax without any matching 
devices. My vertical exhibits 
an swr of 1 .5 to 1 at reso- 
nance and less than ZO to 1 
at the band edges. This swr 



across the entire band is neg- 
ligible in terms of rf loss. 

For 40 meters, the an- 
tenna may have to be guyed 
If you experience much 
strong wind in your area. 
These guys can be made of 
nylon string and tied to 
existing trees or buildings. 
However, for 20, 15, or 10 
meters^ the length is short 
enough that the antenna will 
be self-supporting in most 
winds. The antenna can be 
made of any material that can 
be obtained locally at a 
reasonable price, such as 
downspout, conduit, etc. 

The installation is com- 
pleted by burying the coax 
coming to the building and 
then using your imagination 
to get the coax into the ham 
shack in an unnoticeabie way. 

All connections should be 
soldered and then coated 
with RTV bathtub seal en The 
antenna will surprise you on 
40 meters, and, if you need 
an antenna that no one will 
recognize as an antenna, then 
this is the one for you. ■ 



QUASAR VIDEO 

TAPE RECORDER 

SALEI 




We are constantly testing ham and 
other electronic equipment for review in 
73 Magazine. In order to be able to keep 
this not inexpensive project going we 
have to sell off the equipment used for 
test. Most of it has been used for a few 
days and is in every way as good as new. 
In nnany cases it is better than new since 
95% of the equipment failures come 
within the first few hours of operation. 

In this case we are running a series 
of tests of VTR systems, using them for 
regular, ham TV, SSTV, and even micro- 
computer programming tests. One of the 
best we've found so far is the Quasar sys- 
tem, but we still have to go on and test 
the RCA. )VC, and many other systems 
. , , so our Quasar is up for sale. We paid 
well over $ 1 ,000 for the Quasar . . . used 
it for a few days and have gone on to test 
more systems. 

Quasar VTR 

System, ...... special like new S675, 

Quasar two hour cassettes, 

each (new $25). special like new $12.50 

Major Credit Cards Accepted, 
73 MagJizlne • Peter borough NH 03458 




DSD 






1 us to 
1 sec. 



MODEL 
CTR-2A 



500 MHz 
&1 GHz 



SSBEIIiSBS 



rFJ?£OOfc'NCf 







pcwf^ 



SO 0.3 70 48 



Out — . 







»W3tL £TH-Ja 



10 mv @ 
150 MHz 



Tlie New Model CTR-2A Serfes Counter! are detlgned and built to the highest standards 
to fulfil i th« needs of commerctal communications, engineering l^bs and serious e><peri- 
mentors. With ^n accuracy of + .00005% [oven option} the CTR-2A can handle the most 
critical measurements and Is about half the cost of other commerctal counters. 

If you need a reitabte counter at an affordabte price, the CTR -2 A is the answer. 



* BuiltHn Pre-Amp 10mv@ 150 MHz 

* 8 Digit ,3*' LED Display 

* High Stability TCXO Time Base 

► Built-in VHF-UHF Prescaier 

* Automatic Dp Placem€nt 

> TCXO Std. ± 2 ppm 

500 IVIH? Kit CTR-2A-50aK ....... 

500 IVlH^r Assembled CTR-2A-500A 

1GHz Kit CTB^2A-1000K - - - 

1GHz Assembled CTB-2A'1000A 



• Period iVleasurement (Optionaf) 

• Input Diode Protected 

• 12V-DC Operation (Optionaf) 

• Oven Controlled Crystal (Optional) 
± .5 ppm 

■ Selectable Gate Times - .1 St 1 sec. 



$249.95 

349.95 
399,95 
549.95 



OPTfONS .... 

02) Oven CrystaP 

03) .43" LEO 

04) 12 VDC 



$49.95 
10,00 
10,00 



05) TO sec, Time Ba^e $ 5 00 

06) Period 15.00 

07) Handle TO.OO 



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PROBES 

Hi Z 

SI 5.00 



Low Pass 

315.00 



D10 



DAVIS ELECTRONICS 636 Sheridan Dr., Tonawanda, N.Y. 14150 716/874-5848 



179 



T 



FREQUENCY COUNTERS 



FREE 



Bj^ popular demand we &re coEitiniiliig to off tat 
ft Fa it child Cloek, Module FCS-SlOOA 
(suggested retail $20) with any puvdiase of $99 
ot mare fram 73 «dvertije&i«tttK^ 




UJ 



CO 

Uj 

0) 



PrttvimjKly kitted for Crneomm Inc. bv Hnl-TroniK 

COMPLETE KITS: CONSISTING OF EVERY ESSENTIAL 
PART NEEDED TO MAKE YOUR COUNTER COMPLETE. 
HAL-600A /DIGIT COUNTER WITH FREQUENCY 
RANGE OF ZERO TO 600 MHi FEATURES TWO IN 
PUTS: ONE FOR LOW FREQUENCY AND ONt FOR 
HIGH FREQUENCY; AUTOMATIC ZERO SUPPRESSION. 
TIME BASE IS i.O SEC OR .1 SEC GATE WITH OP 
TIONAL 10 SEC GATE AVAtLABLL ACCURACY ± 
,001%, UTILIZES lOMHj CRYSTAL 5 PPM. 
COMPLETE KIT WM 14i.0O nom 129.00 

HAL'300A 7DIGIT COUNTER WITH FREQUENCY 
RANGE OF ZERO TO 300 MHf. FEATURES TWO IN- 
PUTS: ONE FOR LOW FREQUENCY AND ONE FOR 
HIGH FREQUENCY. AUTOMATIC ZERO SUPPRESSION. 
TIME BASE IS LO SEC OR 1 SEC GATE WJTH OP- 
TIONAL 10 SEC GATE AVAiLASLE. ACCURACY ± 
*001 %, UTILIZES 10>MHl CRYSTAL 5 PPM 
COMPLETE tcrr Wfti 124 00 now tC^.OO 

HAL^SOA B-DIGIT COUhfTER WHH FREQUENCY RANGE 
OF ZERO TO 50 MHi OR BETTER AUTOMATIC DECt 
MAL POINT, ZERO SUPPRESSION UPON DEMAND. 
FEATURES TWO INPUTS: ONE FOR LOW FREQUENCY 
INPUT, AND ONE ON PANEL FOR USE WITH ANY 
INTERNALLY MOUNTEO HALTRONIX PRESCALER 
FOR WHICH PROVISIONS HAVE ALREADY BEEN 
MADE. 1.0 SEC AND A SEC TIME GATES, ACCURACY 
± .001%. UTILIZES 10 Mm CRYSTAL 5 PPM. 
COMPLETE KIT wit 124.00 now 10S.D0 



HAL4R0N1X BASIC COUNTER KITS 
STILL AVAILABLE 

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL DOES NOT COME WITH 
THE BASIC KIT: THE CABINET, TRANSFORMER, 
SWITCHES, COAX FITTINGS. FILTER LENS. FUSE 
HOLDER, T'03 SOCKET. POWER CORD AND MOUNT- 
ING HARDWARE, 

HAL'SOOX (Same Specificatiorts a^ HAL&oaA} $124.00 

HAL'IOOX (Same Specifications am HAL-300A) $a9.00 

HAt-50)C (Sam* Specifications as HAL 50A) , $af.0O 

PRE-SCALER KITS 

HAL*0 300PRE (Pre dn I led GIO board and all com* 
ponents) _ $19>95 

HAt-0-300F/A (Same as above but with preamp) 

S24,95 
HAL-O-eoOPRE (Pre drtJJed GIO board and all com^ 
ponents) S34J5 



HAL &OOPA (same as 600PR except with 

prB'afTip]^ .ii..ii....^.c.,>. . . .^»» »,»,♦», 



V «' * 



$39 ..9S 



ATTN: RADIO CLUBS 

Reas© feel ff&a Xq Inquire atjoial quantity diacounts on any of the HAL- 
TRONIX kJis for yoiif Club proj&cl^. O^scoLint schedule ranges from 10% to 
25% ctei>efiding upon how many hUa ^ill be rdgulrad. 



Hal-Tronix 

P, 0. BOX 1101 

HAi HAROLD c wwLANo SOUTHGATE, MICH. 48195 
wiiXH PHONE (313) 285-1782 

ORDERS OVER J15,00 W[LL BE SHIPPED POSTPAID 

SHIPPING EXCEPT ON ITEMS WHERE ADDITIONAL CHARGES 

ARE REQUESTED. ON ORDEI^S LESS THAN f 15.00 

INFORMATION: PLEASE INCLUDE ADDITIONAL $L0€ FOR HANDLlN^i 

AND MAILING CHARGES, 

SEND sase: kor fr£E flyer ^2* 



MADISOIU SUPER SUMMER BUYS 



NC IFlf OMNI'4 2-meter mobile or portable antenna. 

3/8" thread. SdS gain (1.5-dB gain over conventional 

S/S-wave mobile whip antenna). $29.95, 220^MHz 

$27 J5. 450 f^Hz I27JS. Guaranteed results. 

KLM: Antennas, LInears, Accessories All In Stock. FrM 

balun w/2 meter base antenna. 
FINCO AMATEUR BEAMS In Stock— Call! A62 6 and 2 

Meter _ . , , ISIOO 

BIRD 43 Wattm«t«r ptus slugs, In stock, prepaid freighi. 
BENCHER keyer paddlit m stock $39,95; chrome $49 J5 
MIDLAND 23-^36 dLi«l meter, reads SWR and relative 

POWER handles IkWffom 3-150 MHz. $21.95 

YAESU FT-901D series, , , Call for Quoti 

TELETOWER: 40' w^breakover .-....,. $299 

55* w/breakover $399 

MICROWAVE MODULES , Jn stock 

F9FTT0NNA anlMnM: 144/16 el.. .$55.95 

9/19 OSCAR . , $53,00 

JANEL Preamps fn stock 

TECHNICAL BOOKS: ARRU Sams TAB, Tl, Rider. Radio 

Pub.. Callbook, Cowan, TEPABCO, many others, .call 

HAM X ROTOR (New Model) Turns 28 sq. ft. of antenna. 

List $325. In stock Your Price $249 

CDE HAM'III $129.00 

SWAN METERS: WM 6200 VHF Wattmeter $49 J$ 

SWR 3 Mobile , $9JS 

TELEX HEADSETS:, In stock 

CETRON 572B, .$27,95 ea. 

ADEL nibbimg tool, $645; punch $3.50 

CABLE BiW\ e^strand. soH-drawn guy cable. For mast 

or light tower, 3t foot. 
BELDEN COAX CABLE: 9688 double shield RG8 foam 
coax, 100% braid, suitable tor direct bury 39« H., 8237 
RGB 21 « ft, B2U RGd foam IS^H,, 8443 &wire rotor 
cable 16« iU 8210 72 ohm kw twmlead $19/100 ft. 3235 
300 ohm kw twin lead $12/100 ft., Amphenol PL*259, 
silverplated 59t, UG175 adapter $19, PL'258 dbl 
female $1.00. BNC female chassis mount 59c ea; 
MICRO RG-a/U same size as RG-59. 2 KW PEP @ 30 
MHz 16« ft. 
BELDEN 14 gauge COp. stranded antenna wire . $5/100 ft, 

TIMES M2" loam hirdtlne SOc/tt conrtactors $15 ea. 

KESTER SOLDER 1 lb. 60/40. ,062 , . . $6.50 

LEADER — Amateur Test Equip. — 10% off list. 

MALLORY 2,5A/1000 PIV epoxy diode 19c ai. 

,001 MFD 20KV CAP $1.95 

QE receiving tubas , . 50% off Hat 

QEB14aB, 6950 $795 a« 



SAY Electronic Power Supplies 

CtompletGly Regulated 13.8 to 20 volts dc, vari- 
able. Separate volt and amp meters. Dual pro- 
tection against over voltage and over current, 

t Snip *«*#^»»*«t,--*,, 90'^*'9v 

8 amp. $109.95 

20 amp $159.95 



CALL FOR QUOTES ON: YAESU FT-3010, 
FT301, FT-227R, KENWOOD TS520S, TS820S, 
FT-901DM, FT.101E, ALDA, AMCOMM, VHF- 
ONE PLUS & ETOALPHA. ALL IN SEALED 
CARTONS. CALL FOR QUOTES ON ITEMS 
NOT LISTED. THIS MONTH'S SPECIAL: BEAR- 
CAT 210 SCANNER $249. BEARCAT 250 
—SOON! 

CALL FOR FAST QUOTES 
SPECIAL ORDERS WELCOME M35 



TERMS: Atl prlc#s FOB Houston. Prices subject to change 
without notice. ALI Items Guaranteed. Some Hams subject 
to prior sale. Send letterhead for Amateur dealers price list. 
Texas residents add 5% tax. Please add postage estimate. 

MADISON 

ELECTRONICS SUPPLY, INC. 

1508McKINNEY HOUSTON, TEXAS 77002 

713/65B-0268 NItes 713/497-5683 



ISO 



■c 



^ 





^ 



3J» 



(80-10 HD) (Not to Scale) 



WORLD'S LARGEST SPECIALISTS IN THE DESIGNING. DEVELOPING AND 
MANUFACTURING OF "NO COIL, NO TRAP" ANTENNA SYSTEMS. 

half size • full performance 
multi-band HF communications antennas 



We're Pleased to Introduce Two New Models 
Specifically Designed for the Novice or Technician 



80-10HD(N/T) 
80-40HD(N/T) 



69* o%eral] length 
. for 80/40/20/1 5/1 meter coverage . . _ _ $84.50 

69' overall len^h 
.,,... for 80/40 meter coverage • . • . , S63.75 



Nd antenna tuner required. Completely factory 
ai^Heriibled aiitl tniied specifiriilly for the novice/ 
technician bands. Both models can be easily 



re-tuned for higher license class allocations iit just a 
few minutes. 



HOW GOOD ARE THE MORGAIN HD DIPOLES? HERE ARE A FEW UNSOLICITED 
COMMENTS FROM MORGAIN USERS: 

■ / can only give gloiting reports about it * . , WA2IRN 

■ There is no better antenna at any price • - - W9QI0 

// has given me excellent service and results - . - W6CZS 

no traps -no coils -no stubs -no capacitors 



MO R -GAIN HD OIPOtES , . , •One half the (angth of conver^tional 
half-wavQ dipoles. # Multi-band, Multtfr^quency. # Maximunn effi 
ct«ncy — no traps, loading coils, or stubs. * Fully assdmbled and 
prfr-tuned - no moBsuring, no cutting. SAII weattiar ratod — T KW AM, 
2,5 KW CW or PEP SSB. •Proven performonco — more than 15,000 



have b««n d«liv«r«d. • Permit u«e of the fuFi capabilities of todey's 
S-baruj Kcwrt, # One feedline for operation on all bands. • Lowest 
cost/banefit antenna on the market today. •Fast QSY - no feedline 
svvitching. • HighoKt performance for the Novice as well ai the 
Extra-Clas^ Op. 



exclusive 66 foot, 75- 10 meter dipoies 



■ All models above are f urnishad with crimp /folder luos. 

■ All models can be furnished with a SO 239 female coaxial connector 
at additional cost. The SO 239 nnate$ with the standard PL 2S9 mala 
coaKial cable connector. To order this factory installect option, add the 
lener 'A' after the model number Example: 40-20 HO/A, 

■ 75 meter models are tactorv tunad to rsfonate at 3S50 kHz. (SPJ 
mod ell are factory tuned to resonate at 3800 kHr 80 meter modeli are 
factory tuned lo resonate at 3650 kHz. 5*« VSWR curves for other 
reaonance data. 

#16 40% Copper Wefd wire affrm^Ied $o it handJes like soft Copper 

Wire - RBted for better than full feg^f power AM/CW or 

SSBCoMxiai Of Bal^rtced 50 to 75 ohm feed tine - VSWR urtder f.5 

to t at most heights -* Stsirtfess Steei it^fdwsre — Drop Proof 

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7S-WHD - ONLY $12.00 A BAND* 



MOO£L 

4020 HO 
8&40HD 

75r40 HO 

75^40 HD (SP| 

75-20 HD 

7S20 HD (SP) 

7S10HO 

75^10 HO iSP) 

90-10 HO 



T5 



BANDS 
fMeieri) 

40/20 
80/40 + 
75/40 
75/40 

75/40/20 
75/40/20 
75/40/20/15/10 
75/40/20/15/10 



PRICE 


WEIGHT 


LENGTH 




(Oz/Kg) 


(Ft/Mtrs) 


$49 50 


26A73 


36/10.9 


57.50 


41/1.15 


69/21.0 


5500 


40/1.12 


66/20 1 


57 50 


40/1 12 


66/20 J 


66 50 


44/1.23 


66/20,1 


66.50 


44/1.23 


66/20.1 


7450 


48/1.34 


66/20.1 


74,50 


48/1.34 


66/20.1 


76.50 


50/t,40 


69/21.0 




moR -G4in? 



2200 T South 4th Street 

Leavenworth, Kansas 66048 

(91 3 J 682-3142 

Monday- Friday: 9AM-5PM CSJ 



80/40/20/15/10 

Please write for fulty descriptive 6-page brochure. 
Contact your favorite dealer or order direct from Mor-Gain. 

NOVICE LICENSE OPERATIOM- The MOR-GAIN HD Oipole is the Ideal antenna for the new or ^Joviee operator. As the 
Novjce progresses to higher license dast&s, he can easily re- tune the HD Dipole to the new frequencies of his higher 
frequency privileges. The HD Dipole if thus a one-time investment, HD Dipoies are available for ail Novice fraqyencies. 
LEAST COST. Dollar for doHar. the HD dipoies are the hi^est perfoTmance, least cost multi-barKj antennas on the market 
lodav. Eor Example: the5-band 75 10 HD dipole costs less than $15.00 per band - an unbeatatrte low cost. 
LIMITED REAL ESTATE. Whefe real estate for antenna irtsiallation is limited, the HD dipole is the ideal solution. 
Operation on 80/75/AO meters is now pcssible since ihe HD dipole is only fialf the length of a conventional half wave 
dipole. For all-around operation, the HO dipole will outperform any trap toaded horizontal ot vertical dipole. 
AlKiv* Modeli tumi&hed wvth lyg ntmJnjitttfiiL. Cap-iefna\* 50TS9 cemnpctoir a&ernNy - %^*JS adttitional. include $2 JiO for &MQp*nq 

i t,^r»r«* «,t»vvmi. dniet, g^^j^ Americard, Visa, and 

Mastercharge are available. 




181 



THE TRI-BANDER: 



FINALLY 



Mod«r7Q3A 



$289,95 



Built the way a TRhBANDER should be 

• Rugged 

• Saven Etemenls 

• Three Bands (10'15'20) 

• Optimum Spacing For 
High Forward Gain 
High F:B & F:S Ratios 

for Specifications Write To: 

BROOKFIELD MANUFACTURiNG CO. 

60-08 Meetinghouse Village 
Meriden, CT 06450 
(203) 238-0355 




B13 



D O V E T R O 




MPC4000C 

Multipath Correction 
In Band Diversity & 
AFSK Tone Keyer 

Amateur Net: IM5.00 



Standard features include CONTINUOUSLY tuneable Mark and Space channels (1000 
Hz to 3200 Hz), Dual Mode (MARK or FSK) Autostart and internal high level neutral 
toop k«y«r (20 to 60 ml). Both ElA and MIL FSK outputs are provided for direct 
interfac* to microprocessor and video terminal peripherals. 





MPC-IOOOCR 

Signal Reeeneration & 
Speed Conversion 

Amateur Net: IS45.00 



A front panef switch permtts internal TSR-200 Signal Regenerator Speed convert- 
er assembly to electronically "gear-shift" between 60, 67, 75 and 100 WPM. AJl 
incoming and outgoing signals are regenerated to less than 0.5% bias distortion. 
Also available with DIGITAL Autostart (TSR 2000): Amateur Net: $695,00 

MPC-IOOORA 
TSR-500 

Dual UART Regeneration, 
Speed Conversion, 200 
Chat Memory, Word Cor- 
rection & DIGITAL 

Autostart 

Amateur Net: $895.00* 

The MPC-lOOOR/TSR-500 provides Preloading and Recirculation of the 200 character 

FIFO Memory, a keyboard controlled Word Correction circuit, Variable Character 
Rate, Tee Dee Inhibit, Blank/LTRS Diddle, a Triple Tone^Pair AFSK Tone Keyer and a 
Character Recognition/Speed Determination DIGITAL (DAS-100) Autostart mode, 

•The MPC-IOOOR is also available without a TSR assembly and functions as a MPC- 
lOOOC with a Triple Tone-Patr AFSK Tone Keyer This "Basic-R'* permits future ex- 
pansion with a TSR-100, TSR-ZOO, TSR^20OD or TSR-SOO by sinnply lifting the lid 
and plugging in the appropriate TSR assembly: Amateur Net (Basic-R): $595,00 

Your QSL will bring complete specifications, or call: 213-682-3705. 




023 




627 FREMONT AVENUE 

(P, O. BOX 267) 

SOUTH PASADENA, CA. 91030 



REGULATED 

POWER SUPPLY 



+5 VOLTS 

+ 12 VOLTS 

PLUS 

-15,100,200 V 

$15.95 EA 



* * * * 



2 AMP 



V2 AMP 



. LOCUR. 
2/$29.00 



AOD $2.00 FOR SHIPPING 

DELTRONIKS 

PO BOX 29363 
ATLANTA, GA 30359 

D28 



NEW 



for 78 







$189 « 



less banertes 
and crystals 



«■« 



% 



— * d 



ECM SB MK-II fm modulation meter 

■ Now used % the U.S, Government in 
over 50 locations 

AH new unbreakable A.B.S. cabinet 
0^ kHz peak reading linear scale 
Opiates 25 MHz to 500 MHz 
Crystal controlled for easy operation 
Audio/Scope output with earphone 
Options: NIC AD power PAK S 34,95 
Charger $39 J 5 

Wrhc or call for comphte inforirmtion. Send 
check or money ordsr for $789. Shippmg 
pr^paM In US. tndiana fesidents add 4% s&f^ 
tax. Crystals $7.95 each. 

ECM Corporation 
1412 N. Weinbach Ave. 
Evaniville IN 47 7 H 
812 476 2121 El 



ECM 



NEW 



® 



£L£CTRON<CS 



35QA S599 

^KEMWOOD TR-7400 $399 

WANT TO TRADE - UP- 
GRADE? Call us - for best 
quote. Large assortment of 
clean used equipment on hand. 

50th Year Serving Amateurs 

W4WL mas.: ■■■^ W4V0V 





radio 



38—40 Biitmore Ave. « 
Asheviile,N C 28801 

PHONE: {704} 252-8000 



F3 



m 



182 



DSI 



DSI INSTRUMENTS INC. 



Be the one who's on FREQUENCY!! 

With your DSI Counter. , .save the shop cost of tweaking xtals. . . 
know your frequency. . .from 160 meters through 450 MHz. Now DSI 
offers the most counter for your dollar. Latest state-of-the-art 
technology. . .DSt advanced LSI design far exceeds outdated TTL, 
Go with the leader . , .buy a DSI FREQUENCY counter and SAVE 
TIME&MONEYH 



NOT A KIT 







^; 



.7isa«j*^^i 



Si ?jS--«-- 



itl id.. 



c n 



U Lt 



i^;^^lSfeS 




MODEL 3500 $139.95 



MODEL 3600 A $189.95 
includes oven timebase 



500 MHZ Frequency Counter 600 MHz Frequency Counter 



« 
* 



Includes 500 IV;Hz Prescal&r — Not an addon 

7 Large bright — ^/2 inch LED Readouts 

Temperature compensated crystal timebase 

Accuracy 1 PPM Typ 

Sensitivity 50 MvRms 150 & 250 MMz 150 MvRms 450 MHz 

Gate time ligtil 

No direct RF connection Required 

AC or DC operation 

50 Hz to 500 MHz typ 

Comprehensive owners manual with complete accurate schematics 

Factory assembled & tested 



• Includes oven compensated crystal timebase 

• Includes built-in 600MHz Prescaler-Not and addon 

• a Large bright — Vz inch LED Readouts 

• Two timebases 0.1 sec & 1. sec 

• Resolution 1 Hz Direct 10 Hz Prescaled 

• Sensitivity 20 MvRms @ 150 & 220 MHz 100 MvRms 450 MHz 

• Accuracy .5 PPM over temperature 
« Oven light & Gate time light 

• Automatic Decimal point placement 

• NO DIRECT RF CONNECTION Required. 

• Comprehensive owners manual witji complete accurate schematics 

• AC or DC operation 

• SO Hz to 600 MHz Typ. 

• Factory assembled & tested 



Use it in the car or on the bench. , .take it to the repeater site. . .high-impact case. . .light 
weight— but rugged. . .Designed with the latest readily available LSI, CMOS, Schottky, Med- 
integrated circuits. 

NEW PRODUCTS 

250 MHz 7 Digit Battery operated hand held counter $109.95 available mia January. 

3V2 Digit Bench Degttal Multi-meter AC or Battery operated $99,95 available mid-Febmary. 



Strongest Warranty in the Counter Field. ONE Year Parts and Labor we pay the return shipping. Plus 
. . .Satisfaction guaranteed . . . Dennis Romack . . . WA60YI , . , VP-Marketlng, DSI. 



D25 



TO ORDER CALL COLLECT (714) 565-8402 



Name_„ 



City 



Phone; 
Order 



_Call 



-$tate_ 



Z\^ 



D Check enc^QS^d P Please send more information ora your rult Nne ot Instruments and Accesaocies. 
O BankAm erica rd D MasierCharge i VISA Zl RE. 

_CaFd expiration date Signature 



Credtr card # 



DSt INSTRUMENTS INC. 

Div. Diversified Security Ind, Inc. 

We pay shipping charges anywhere In 
the U.S.A. UPS Brown or P.P. — CA 
Residents please add 6% state sales tax. 

• Annerican Express • Bank of America 

• MasterCharge * VISA 



7914 Ronson Road No. G, San Diego, CA 921i1 



133 



AMATEUR 
TELEVISION 

OIM 
43B.S5 MHz 



INTERESTED ? ACTIVITY IS 

INCREASING EVERYWHERE 
YOU CAN GET ACTIVE IN YOUR 
AREA WITH OUR PRODUCTS - 

AMIi FST V CONVERTER 
complete ,,.,.„„.„-....-„ S150." 



AX10B FSTV TRANSMITTER 



complete 



$38500 



CALL 8r2-336-4775,OR WRITE US, 
FOR COMPLETE DETAILS 

APTRON 



^ii=i"]=f'\«"]= 



PO BOX 323 
BLOOMINGTON,INDIANA,47401 



PCP"TVPE!fl 



Nnff 



PI:J> 1fP[-l iniNSFER NIH hlt[rjkr«»k pfthfCTIt Idtim piidfd pi|t^ 

iolT iJitilinil MiliPlitli rfidrfJ iti liiitlirid haFdi. iiit1«Kr. I fllphilill 



SEE POPULAR ELECTRONICS 
FEB '78 ISSUE! 



FlKllUT m (fp m*i.t nih tfUlUST tir.njf4 i:rtc»r bv*m riir»HI| \tim 
mafiiini e«ii|F|iclii« jfLidIei! Cii ilts ki tutd It ailii i|iicii<N|li 
metrl li«l, FritE IWHil iiCtIt, (iationf-hr pliLcmiAt dKAll I tlhin, 



Small Pkg. 6 pes 4x6 $5.49 
Med.Pkg. 4 pes 6x9 $6.95 
Large Pkg. 3pcs 9x12 $7.95 



PCP 



nimi cMart mmm ci. 
rt Ml till 
fEimi 11 fiui 



fVW 



^h 



-W** 



■^^ 



,1 



REGULATED POWER SUPPIY 

• Fufiy icytiiai^. dual protected, 13.8 voils 
• Illuminated qn/qff switcl^ 
■ Hammertpne metal case 

33Amp f30 Amp cominuous),. ,5119,95 

20 Amp (16 amp cont) $74.95 

6 Amp i 6 amp. cgnt | ....... S39.95 

TIMES CABLE 

RO^aU - TOO multiples =,-.-.. 18C/1L 
BG-2i3y - tMon-contaminating jacket) 

-100 multiples 22e/il. 

V Aluminum Jacketed hardline - 75 onm. 

10O0' rolls only 29e/fL 

PL2S9 connectors 55/50e ea. 

or 100/45C ea. POSTPAID 

UNIVERSAL TOWERS 

SUPER DISCOUNTS - 
S.A.S.E. for brocfture snd prices! 

S€^nd 5.A S £ tOf addEtiQTidt mforrnation tnciudtt ship- 
ping cJiargfti mth cnecit or rnofi«y ordm (Otiio 
resiilefits add 4'?% sa^<^ tax.) 

JRS ELECTRONICS 

P.O. Box 1893— Cincmnati. Ohio 45201 



m I ^. I n ^ 



1%^ 




* 



I *.■ 



Radio equipment 
not inclad&d 

Floor Space: 3S"Wiiie 30" D«Qp 



, . ,at lost . . . 
your shack organized! 

A beautiful piece of furniture — your XYL wifl love it! 

$13995 S-F RADIO DESK 

Deluxe -Ready to Assemble 

Designed wiih angled rear shetf for your 
viewing comfort and eas€ of operation. 

FINISHES: Walnut or Teak Stain. 
A 1 90 available in Unfinished Birch, $124.96. 
Addilional ln1ortnai^or)<]>n Request. 

Checks, Money Orders. BankArnerlcard 

and Ma$tef Charge Ac<:6pl&d. 

RO,B, Culver City, (In Calif, Add 6% Sales Ta)(,J «-^ 
., 5>Jo 



S-F AMATEUR RADIO SERVICES 
4334 KEYSTONE AVENUE • CULVEfi CITY. CALIF 90230 - PHONE (213) SST-^eJO 



P. O. BOX 3506 



KEY ii 




Hies 

ECTADY, H. Y, ?^<» 



GOOD PRICES 

Same dty xrvke - Hew ^lixchandise - No Surplus 

Linear ICs 

UA5SbTuTwi fi nuiniiiii S .4SeL 

CA3140 A.b MH3. widt bami op amp 6 mimdip 11-20 ei. 

Elec tto ly tic Ca p^^ci tors : \ u^i^tf^ i^Msrani 

10 uF ^5 V 4xial . 15 «a. IGO uF 25 V tidiftl .25 ea. 
47 uF 25 V ami .17 ti 220 uF 25 V f»ai*l .31 ei 
1000 uF 25 V airial .55 », 470 uF 25 V radial ,32 ei 



Transistors: 

MPS 221tA as H. S/$l 00 2M3904 
MPS 2907A .25 ea. Sk/Sl 00 3W590fc 



2$«.s/sicn 

,S6i 5/Sl-OO 



Send chock <^ money ardflr ZJ Y S r? ?i tax. 

$L0O Ehipfitmg ^nd hamilin^ change fof .jiuiri ;• ui^'jct ^ i ^.00. 

Smi<1 .2$ iut complclv list <i[ niiitcliuivdiiie, 

$5,00 minimum order. K14 



Seee- H^om &, Speneez 
Siectzomcd 

1465 WELLS STATION ROAD 

MEMPHIS. TENN. 38108 

PH (901) 683-9 125--685-8<t61 

Authorized Dealer 

DRAKE— (COM— KENWOOD 
REGENCY— TEMPO— DENTRON 



CALL OR WRITE 
FOR BEST DEAL 



S39 



TOUCH TONE - SPECIALS 




RETAIL 

Mfi«M 200 TrandlifH loui^for^ )tvi«li«t 

«&mpl«|]« wijift iHifh-tO-tBlk . . . f79.S0 

MDd«l fOO WE. ITT. ot S/C 12 button 
ErK;4dv a^wmtlvd w/box A 
4^ablv ,,-.....,....,.. $27. 50 

Mocffll 1.0£ S«m« #t Mo^fll 100 witfi autc^ 

M\t . . , S33.50 

hAod^llO S«mQ ^ M^a^ 100 tiut with 
tp«a|(Br and mm^Ullstnan 

CAbiB ....,,,,, s?9.&a 

Modal &0 Autornatlc tranvrittter koyifiiy 

■nddfitDv kit . . * ......$ 7, BO 

13 button touch ton* oadt r«- 
cond tt'Orittd with 90 dw 

WBrr^rtiy ,*.,♦.».. ... f 14.00 

tooch Tana p|d tiQutings .. « . . f 4,2S 
Repair Touch ToFna Pad iR«fMir .««,..»$ €, 2$i 

iJT 347C 9 Statio*^ Totich Tgiw tntareoTi 

suiuble for auto pt^vch ...... $1 10.00 

Specist U««d 12 tjunoti Touctk Ton* 

PacK 9J-*f*"t*m6 id wofk on 
li^rhf*! — limited quantjtv . . . , tlO.OO 



FtowiOM rmidmnt* «Jct 4K mIm I«k. FOS Lwiburp 
'SliipDine sMoiA/iid on prepaid ordari of $3!) 00 or 
Tr\oi&. Otti«r» incltJ<Je $1.0D poits^ and hnndlino. 



TELEPHONE EQUIPMENT COMPANY T31 



CALL TOLL FREE 



CUSHCRAFT 
ATB^34 



Classic 33 
Classic 36 
TA-33 
TA-36 
TA 33Jr. 
TA-40KR 



ATB-34 
ARX 2 
A147 20T 

A 1 44- 1 OT 
A144-20T 
A14T-IVIB 



4BTV 
RM-75 
RM-75S 
G 6- 144- A 



TH6DXX 

TH3MK3 

Hy*Quad 

THS-Jr, 

18 HT 

14AVQ/WB 

18AVT/WB 

203 

205 

208 

214 



MOSLEY 

3ele. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
6 ele. 10, 15, 20 Wttr. beam 
3ete. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
6ele. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
3ele. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
40 Mtr, add on 

CUSHCRAFT 

4ele. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
2 Mtr, Ringo Ranger 

2 Mtr. Twist 

lOefe, Twist 2 Mtr. 
20 efe. Twist 2 Mtr. 
Mounting Boom 

HUSTLER 

10 40 Mtr, Trap Vertical 
75 Meter Resonator 
75 Meter Super Resonator 
6 db. 2 Mtr. Base Colrnear 

HY-GAIN 

Super Thunderbird 

3 ele. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
2ele. Quad 10, 15, 20 Mtr. 
Sele. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
Hy Tower 10*80 Mtr. Verticar 
10-40 Mtr, Trap Vertical 
10-80 Mtr. Trap Vertical 
3efe, 2 Mtr. beam 

5 eie, 2 Mtr. beam 
8ele. 2 Mtr. beam 
14 ele. 2 Mtr. beam 



WILSON 

System One 5 efe. 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 
System Two 4 ele, 10, 15, 20 Mtr. beam 



Regular 

$232.50 
310,65 
206.50 
335,25 
151.85 
92.25 



239.95 
32,95 
54.95 
34.95 
54.95 
15.95 



15.50 
30.00 
67.55 



249.95 

199.95 

219.95 

144.50 

279.95 

67.00 

97.00 

12.95 

16.95 

19.95 

26.95 



259.95 

199.95 



Special 

S 139.95 
249.95 
169.95 
279.95 
129.95 
74.95 



199.95 
29.95 
47.95 
31.95 
47.95 
14.95 



82.95 
13.50 
26.50 
57.95 



209.95 
169.95 
189.95 
129.95 
239.95 
57.00 
84.95 



239.95 
1 85.00 



MOSLEY CL-36 



TR^ 



mmn/^ 



CDE ROTORS 

Ham III $125.00 

T2X Tail Twister $249.00 
CD-44 $105.00 

Call for SUPER price on Consolidated Tower and Beric-Tec Coax Cable 



18HT 



Open seven days a inreeK 



RINGO 
RANGER 



4BTV 



C^ n^mm 6* Qt^mmix 



Communications Center 

The Radio Store 



csa 



443 N. 48th, Lincoln, Nebraska 68504 



In Nebraska Call {402)466-8402 



master charge 

I Ml l«t|.Mi4Hii ttW 



185 



Be Old Fashioned 



4111!^ 



Try it 

■efore Vdh 
Duyit 



e)DB®li!llMEK 



Radio 
Supply 



185*191 West Mam Street • P O Box 8B 
AmsiefdamM Y 12010 Tel (518)842-8350 
Ju$l 5 minutes from NY- Thruway — Exit 27 




Same day alilpmenl Rrst line parts only Factofy 
lesteo Guarantee money back Quality IC s arid 
other cofnponems ai iactory prices. 

illTEGRATED CIFtCUrTS 



P.O. Bq% 4430M Sania Clara, CA 95^354 
Fflr will c^il enfr t*Mt ^«*1^ 



2996 Scott Bm. 

MClf 



ELECTRONICS 




Q3 



i>- 



4«IHl9^1 



'ItTti 



l«Cl»l»fc 



tmm 



r4i>ui 

uuvt 
mm 

7*19311 



n 
m 

wt 
*t 
m 

3 

*i 

1 iii 

I.M 
M 
.H 
.H 



TtiKHirn. 

11 <li4ti 
«t3IWI 

f»Lt2H 






.3?i 



LUal iM'li 
lm:iI|<'I'K 

LM3IP 
LMa^K.b 

LMS?(!i-lI 

lm:i?iu!.i» 

LMJHll'H 

LMim- 
-iMUij'r^i 



n 

PI" 

^ '■ 

M' 
U|i 

J a; 
«a 

ID 

;s 

1 J5 
I %!l 

1 a 
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1 n^ 

1>U 

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1 fD 

1 










I.uv 



N|Dli«lllKll|r 
HAM 

?ini!" I 3 lis 

JlLrJALlLia 

iiFo; ljm 



111 n Ni^i 

HifrrtaflilllltM H.V 

Etmk ni<n[i# Tiiin> 13^3 n 

JurtiliD 4nd 7P 

Srtui Cluirnf TMl's Junfi^ Ji 

Wf/mas ■ I I pipi ui a 

tantpn* inilwi. v-rr^' ^imb nvn 

H »ffD4iLJlII ■ 
CmnpHr Inr hi Ijri. jd^.iiij a imI wulii. 
iUX IMll ii|ll Fin PH Untf 
:}K Wmt Mi|J.r IDDlt li iliprt 
PtiriUI* IWllrnnlii |l|iK 

OiDftAL niUlMDMFTIll tM SD 

Bril. uptr iiiraiil [Htrnuui ui m)id(:.i 
kr'-23{lT 4Mkt(7btbP4rqbp:iiRi -■ .' 

dmrwrs ttiiwism 

IK n*»i Bnr? Hil 
4K EPFUlM lin 
l.'i}^ Hninl' Nil 

fitiihiiR! Iinarj ■■'wiFwrlnr 
V'lliPif ii'hi Im bnlrd kn 
i[iK fJ'JHnM EHiirll kl Mn H^nMS '"I W 
\\K S^Jllr H^M liuiru Mil m W 

NDiih hv Mnppr Dill Klf UOq ffi 
Milllliinil lhii« i-i\ Atiia 



|1,M tlTi 

44 no 
i?!i no 



tEiMKMnllvmif 
dtVEf I91«u 

aim 
Umrm 

WW 

i^i:ir.ii{j,Mii CC(Q 
fhn-in'i'.!i! i r r* 
I h .>!iiiiniir ' ; \i 

4 9(Ui trtiii 
lil^R r«turit«n1 
W^f^ hunmml 
tttflu 14 ijri linm 



11UI1 htvt 
IC T«il Ciili 



no 1 w 



|l4ll 

lllliik: 



i 

bb 



Sinclair ZVz Digit Multiineler 

Ban. /AC Qper. 1 mV and 1 NA rssoluljon . 

Resistance Id 20 meg. 1% accuracy Smail, 
pcrrtab le , cc mpl e<tfl ly ei 5 se m . I n ca:^^ 1 y r 
guarantee Best value w$t\ $S9.9S 



NotaClieap Clock Kit 514.95 

Includes everything except ctstr. 2-PC 
boards 6-5^ LED Displays 5314 clock 
titup, trBHslormer. all comporienls imi M 
instruoi. Gri^n aind ofgngt ^ifplays also 
avai^ Same lul w/JIT dtipiivs. S21.35 



Digital Temperature Reter Kit 

Indoor ana uutdotir Swiicri«3 bicx. ant} 
tQrtti Beautjful 50' L£D rtadouts. 
NotlHig like It available Neffds no aiiift- 
tional parts tor complde. lull operaticrn 
'«^^l meKwv -tCK^io -t-IOCrf.alrorliqux] 
very accumt e®mp \n%t. $39 3S 
Beautitut lurdwood case vifhtiti 1 1 1J5 



NiCad Batt. Ftier/Ctiarger Kit 

opens shQTtffd Gets tm wnjn t hQld i 

c^rgt and ttien ct^g«s tneni u^. tl in 

-- ■ ' *,Tull pans & mslrgc S7.25 

BCA Cosmac VIP Kil 275.00 

Vid«) conpiHy irtfi jpmes and pruriiiB. 
78 IC Upcfale Master Manual 

CofTipkeie iC dnj $e«a:tor £ 175 pg Mts^ 
{» ftiarema guid« Owf 4 2, 000 a&ss 
J tkt tB KMi , fret upOAe servict m^Di;o^ 
197B. Dofiifistie potties S3 SO. Fortjgr^ 
SSm finl 1f77ltear dMaoiK HSJi 



New Cosmaa Super "ELF'' 

RCA CMOS e?(pandab^e to 6AK itlicro- 
compuEer w/HEX keypad input and vidao 
output for Qraphics Just rurn on and 
start badiftg yourpro^riim using rhe res(- 
dtini mi^nitDf on HOM. Pushbutton selec- 
tion of all four CPU modes. LED ind^cato^s 
of ciirrent CPU mode airid fouf CPU stales, 
Single step op, fOfprDgram debug. Built 
in pwr, supply, 256 Byt&s of RAM, audJa 
inio. & spkr Dvtailed assiy mm w/PC 
boarcf & all parts fully ^oE^k^^d- Comp. 
Kit $106:95 High address display opllon 
$M. Low address display option 1.96: 
Curiam hardwDQd cab , drilled fiDnt 
panel 13JS. ^»cad Baasy Bsckyp Kit 
Mr/ail p^s AM fully wired & ttstad In 
Cifttnei 151.79 1802 so ft ware club 10^ 
^2pg rnqnthPy puDlicatJOP l?,00peryr 

4K Elf Expansion Board Kit 
wjtti Cassette l/F $79.95 

Ai^i^|)»e on ksfd options: iK£up«rROil 
monitof $1§.95 Piralel UQ port S7. 95 
R3232 LF S3.5fl TIY 20 dia IF St.95 
S-1D0 U«morr ■ ^ U.m 

Tiny BasTc for ANY 1 802 Sysfefn 

Mnsas Cjty Soodif^ Cassette SIO 00 
On ROM Monttor $38.00 
Siip«* £tf owiflf* t^ aO*t off 

Oriiinal Cosmac **ELF kit 

AM parts -_.^:^^:i. stf.SQ 

Soa/d o(% 11.^ 



60 Hz Cryslal Time Base 

Kit $4.40 Converts digital clocks 

from AC Ime Irequcncy to crystal time 
base. Outstanding accuracy Kit IricJudes: 
PC board. MIVI5369, crystal, ftslsiors. 
capacitors aod trimrnflf 



Clock Calendar Kit S23.95 

P7ai5 diriect dr^ve chip displays da^i^ 
and time or^ 6' LEDS wttTi AM PM mdh 
cantor Alarm/doie feature includes bui- 
lef . Completfl with aJi parti, power s^jppiy 
and Fimlrudions. It&s case 



2.5 MHi Frequency Counter 

Kit Complete kti less ast £37.50 

30 Mttr Frequency Counter 

Kit CompJeie lut iess case S47.75 
Pmcaler Kit to 350 MH; |1i.e 



Slopwatcli Kit S26.9S 

fyi Sut Oigil tulKfy 4|KntiCL 2-S vtillS. 
3.2/68 MHz Cfyslai KCuTKy Tlnies lo 
SSmin, S9sec. . 99 IrtOO sec finjes std , 
spit ifld lay^ 7205 zhip. m ^m^ 
Efits ni^fius case FutI mssmc Mm^ 
plastic case Mtti bej^' ^ 00 



Video Modulator Kit £8 95 

Convert yciur TV sef into i liigb iiuaiiy 
rnonitot witSHxit Electing niHiital usage. 
u>m|}lete krt «ntt^ (ui t n-smjcfioFts 



Auto Clock Kit $U.95 

DC cbc4i wtifi 4-50^ ditpliy$ thits 
Niuonai MA-I0t2 module wrtrt alann 
opiKm Indm^ iigiit dirmnef crrslil 
Umetase PC boards Fully regulated. 
cCMiig instructs At^ S3 95 fof bmmi\ 
dat iiray cse 8e$t vaiu? gnywl^fre 



Tt»MS. S5J0min.orderU,S, Funds CalitresidefitsaddG%tai FREE Seni! for your cppy of our NEW 1976 
BtnicAmericard and Maslir Cfiarge accepted, QUEST CATALOG, Include 24^' sismp, 

Sliifiping charges will be added on charge cards. 



I 
I 

$L00 1 SPDT-115vAC— lOOW HK 
1.25 I BNCConn n F.£. 

3.Q0 I tS^ $4.95 

4.95 1 
3.00 ] 
1.00 ] 




TRilNSFOBMeRS | COAZ-RELXY 

ilSvAC 

12 V .2 A 
6.3 .6 

12.6 ct 3 

17.7 4 
25.2 ct 2 
36 cl .065 
40 cl 2 



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186 




iDiTQR!AL 8Y WAYNE GRBEN 



from page 51 

Royal Coach Inn . . . see you 
there. 

HOW TO SELL 
AMATEUR RADiO 

The secret to survival is to be 
needed , . . to be important. 
The small countrfes which 
make up the bulk of the votes at 
the international Telecommuni^ 
cations Union (ITU) do not, in 
the main, understand amateur 
radio. Those who do not con- 
fuse it with CB often think of it 
and put ;t down as mainly an 
American hobby. 

Put yourself In the position 
of the king or president of a 
small country. Your shortwave 
broadcasting people are rais- 
ing hell because they can*! get 
a frequency which fs in the 
clear to broadcast news and 
cultural programs. Business- 
men are raising the devil be- 
cause they frnd it impossfble to 
get clear channels for com- 
munications between their of- 
fices and their trucks, ware- 
houses, etc. Your phone ser- 
vice is lousy because there is a 
shortage of frequencies for 
that. With all these pressures, 
how much support Is your gov- 
ernment going to give to an 
American hobby group which 
wants to use these valuable fre- 
quencies for playing around? 
You got the picture? 

Oh, we can talk all day about 
emergency communications, 
but a country with two hams is 
not going to get a fot of help in 
any emergency. That is irrele- 
vant to them. 

Sure, radio amateurs have in- 
vented and pioneered most of 
the communications tech- 
niques in everyday use. But 
these countries are not In- 
terested in more inventions— 
they want spectrum space and 
they want it right now and hang 
r»ext year or ten years from 
now. 

Radio frequencies can be 
rented and sold, so they are a 
nice source of Income. When a 
singie communications Chan- 
nel can earn over $1 milfion a 
year, why on Earth would a 
country want to just plain give 
that channel away to hams? 
That's nuts. 

There are several reasons 
why these small countries 
should support not only the 
present ham bands, but help us 
to get more . . . and these are 
extremely Important reasons 
for these countries. If we can 



get the leaders of these coun- 
tries to understand the impor- 
tance of amateur radio to them, 
well get our bands , . , and 
more. 

So what are the benefits of 
amateur radio to emerging na* 
tions? First, there is their 
almost unbelfevabie need fof 
focal people trained in elec- 
tronics and communications. 
Without amateur radio as a per- 
sonal interest, it is very difficult 
to get people to take the time 
and effort it requires to learn 
electronics. Let^s face it, there 
are a lot of easier ways of earn- 
ing a living. 

Without native people to help 
install, service, and operate the 
telephone, radio, and other 
communications systems, a 
country has to pay such in- 
credible salaries to bring in 
Swiss and German technicians 
that they end up with very little 
communications. The whole 
world is going electronic— ra- 
dio and computers, micro- 
waves, satellites — without 
these modern systems, a coun- 
try just can't grow and keep up 
with Its neighbors. 

Amateur radio clubs for the 
teenagers can spark the en- 
thusiasm which will result first 
in hundreds and then thou- 
sands of hams, people interest- 
ed personally in electronics 
and communications— the very 
best type of people for a grow- 
ing country and an invaluable 
asset. A country should begin 
to see the first benefits from 
such a program within two 
years of its inception. 

A Ham Trade Mission could 
encourage these emerging na- 
tions to set up a ham station in 
each of the youth centers^ com- 
plete with a traveling teacher to 
Instruct the prospective hams 
on a once-a-weeh basis. The in* 
vestment for a country would 
be miniscule compared to the 
benefits. The Mission would 
cooperate to provide a set of 
rules and regulations which 
would be tailor-made for the 
country and which would en- 
courage youngsters to get their 
ham (icenses and progress. 
The Mission could also arrange 
for teaching materials for XhB 
prospective hams— in their 
native language* 

The nice thing about it is that 
everyone involved would bene- 
fit. The countries would devel- 
op a low-cost supply of trained 
technicians and eventually en* 
gineers. The kids would have a 



fun hobby plus the opportunity 
to make their own way as far as 
they want in the world, an op- 
portunity which Is available to 
very few in these new coun* 
tries. The ham manufacturers 
who participate would have the 
possibilities of greater safes of 
their equipment as these mar- 
kets open. And amateur radio 
worldwide would benefit from 
having another country support 
it at the ITU, plus a lot more DX 
contacts. 

One additional benefit for 
any small country is the unique 
ability of radio amateurs to pro* 
mote their country. A Stanford 
study (distributed by the ARRL) 
showed that there are more 
people listening to radio 
amateurs on the short waves 
than to the shortwave broad- 
casting stations. Amateurs 
could have a significant effect 
on the tourist trade In a coun- 
try, just by talking up the coun- 
try and inviting anyone listen- 
ing to come and visit. There is 
little correlation between gov- 
ernnnent shortwave broad- 
casting and tourism, but hams 
do bring in their worldwide 
friends like a magnet. 

Mounting a Ham Trade Mis- 
sion is not going to be inexpen* 
sive. While it is true that in the 
long run such a Mission might 
benefit those who participate 
In it to some degree, so will all 
of the manufacturers benefit, 
for a developed ham market is 
anyone's game. There is good 
reason lor every amateur manu- 
facturer and dealer to support a 
Hambassador Trade Mission 
program. Without ham bands 
you have no business, and has 
anyone come up with any other 
plan for protecting bands? 

Just between 73 and QST, I 
count about 230 different firms 
in the ham business who are 
advertising, and that's just for 
one month. If each of these 
firms put up S20 a week toward 
the Hambassador program, we 
would have $19,933 a month 
available for getting amateur 
radio going in the third world 
countries, and enough left over 
to do one whale of a job of lob- 
bying In Washington and see- 
ing to It that nothing like the 
linear amplifier disaster hap- 
pens again. 

If you think this is a good 
idea, you might drop a letter or 
QSL card to some of your favor* 
ite manufacturers and call your 
local ham dealer and see if you 
can get them to get behind 
such a plan. No firm that is in 
business can be hurt by S20 a 
week, and any firm that is too 
stingy to help get amateur 
radio over a very rough spot 
does not deserve your support. 

The Amateur Radio Manuf ac- 
turer's Association (ARMA) 
should, I think, include dealers 
in their group and solicit the 




funds to protect the future of 
amateur radio, whether it be to 
garner the votes of emerging 
nations at the ITU, to thwart the 
blundering of the FCC, or even 
to counter predatory attacks 
from the likes of a Cooper. 

Since Jordan Is one of the 
best examples of the value of 
amateur radio as a medium for 
the development of a technical 
body, I should think that a Mis- 
slon would first go there and 
get familiar with the situation 
which was set up and how It 
worked. I would be surprised If 
King Hussein would not coop- 
erate with such a group and 
perhaps put in a good word to 
help them meet at the highest 
levels in some other countries. 
With that excellent back- 
ground, the Mission would be 
on firm ground in talking with 
the leaders and telecommuni- 
cations ministers of other 
countries. We might be able to 
find out from our State Depart- 
ment (and perhaps even from 
the CIA) what funds are avail- 
able from the U.S. to back up a 
Mission . . . with such things as 
ham stations for youth clubs. 

The effects of such a Mission 
could snowball Even a few suc- 
cesses could be turned into 
triumph through public rela- 
tions and promotion. Once a 
few countries have agreed that 
this is a good idea, It will be 
much easier to sell others on \t, 
and such a movement coufd 
completely rewrite the present 
handwriting on the wall _ , 
which Is exceedingly grim. The 
first few visits will be critical; 
from then on, less experienced 
teams could follow up and 
make sure that every voting 
country of \hB ITU is visited at a 
high level. 

The important thing is to get 
started as quickly as possible 
, , . like this summer. If we wait 
much longer, many countries 
will have firmed up their WARC 
proposals. It is much easier to 
stay out ol trouble than to try 
and get back out of it after 
youVe in. Getting countries to 
change their minds, once set. Is 
much more difficult than pre- 
venting the setting in the first 
place. 



187 







from page J 5 

State. Object is for all stations 
outside the 7th W/VE call 
districts to QSO as many 7-fand 
WA/E stations as possible in a 
maximum of 30 hours out of the 
total 3B-hour contest period. 
The same station can be 
worked on each band. 

EXCHANGE: 

All WA/E stations (including 
KH$ and KL7) transmit RS(T) 
and state or province; foreign 
stations transmit RS(T] and 
serial QSO number 

SCORING: 

On each band, 7-land sta- 
tions get 1 multiplier for each of 
the 50 US states and 1 
multiplier for each Canadian 
province- AM others get 1 
multiplier for each state or pro* 
vince worked in the 7th WA/E 
call districts {on each band). 
7-1and includes: Alaska, 
Arizona, British Columbia 
(Canada), Idaho, Montana, 
Nevada, Oregon, Utah^ 
Washington, and Wyoming. 

Power multipliers are as 
follows: 500 Watts dc input or 
more ^ multiplier of 1.00; 300 
to 499 Watts dc input = 1.25; 
100 to 299 Watts dc input = 
1,50; less than 100 Watts dc in- 
put = 2,00, 

Final score is total valid 



QSOs times QSO points times 
total sum of all multipliers 
times the power multiplier for 
your station. QSO points are 1 
point per QSO for 74and sta- 
tions including other 7'land 
QSOs; atl others score 5 points 
per 7-land QSO. 

ENTRIES & AWARDS: 

Certificates of performance 
will be issued to the top scores 
in each state, province, and 
country for single class opera- 
tion. Certificates issued to top 
multi-op station in each WA^E 
call district. All entries must In- 
clude a self-prepared log sheet 
with separate sheets per band. 
Each log must show freq, 
mode, date/time GMT, station 
worked, exchange sent and 
receivedt and points. Each en- 
try must include a completed 
summary sheet; for stations 
with over 100 QSOs, a dupe 
sheet for each band must be 
submitted. Dupe sheets are 
seJf-prepared! All entries must 
include a business size SASE; 
foreign stations may enclose 2 
IRCs. Deadline for entry is 
Aug,1. Mail entries to: NAS 
Whidbey Island ARC, Bill 
Gosney WB7BFK, 4471 40th NE 
St., Oak Harbor WA 98277 USA. 

Summary sheets and contest 
rules can be obtained from the 



above address, Pfease include 
an SASEi 

THE PONY EXPRESS 

CERTIFICATE 

This award is being reissued 
by the Missouri Valley Amateur 
Radio Club, Inc. The certificate 
will be available to any ham 
working the HF bands. This cer- 
tificate is not affiliated with any 
other organization. To qualify, 
tJS amateurs must work 5 
MVARC members, then send 5 
QSLs confirming contacts plus 
two 13(S stamps. DX amateurs 
must work 3 MVARC members, 
then send 3 QSLs plus 1 1RC. All 
QSLs should be sent directly to 
the certificate manager: WBQ^ 
PO Box 141 Station E., St. 
Joseph MO 64505. 

Member stations to work are: 
WB0LVW, WfflNUT, KfflERD, 
WB0WXD, WB0VRB- WD«BBH, 
WBOMGQ. WflYVJ, WB0ZLM, 
WBCVRA, WB0HNO, W0GC, 
WBOWXE, WBCWKK, WDDGEJ, 
W€PWH, WAOCHE, W©QB, 
WB0HEF, K©CWQ, WBOVOY, 
WB0ZLP, W0FXD, WD(&GEK, 
WfilHRL, K0UQH, W80VRD, 
WB0OV2, WB0PKJ, KCZMZ, 
WA0RTT, W0FXY, WB©EYJ. 
WBCZLO, 

CAf^TERBURY AERO CLUB 
AWARD— JULY, 1978 

Contact any station and use 
the last letter of the caHsign to 
make up the words "Canter- 
bury Aero Club." All stations 
must contact at least one ZL3 
station with additional ZL3 sta- 



tions used as bonuses to fill 
any gaps. Each station may be 
used only once for the award, 
Use all bands, all modes; also 
available to SWLs. No QSLs re- 
quired; send certified list only 
to CAC Award. PO Box 1733, 
Christchurch. New Zealand. 
Cost is 50^ for ZL, $1 overseas 
(award airmailed). Applications 
must be received before 
November 1, Award period is 
the entire month of July, 1978! 
Note: Overseas stations can 
claim the Christchurch award 
also at no additional cost if 
they contact 5 ZL3 (Christ- 
church) stations; VK contact 
10. 

JEFFERSON DAVIS 
MONUMENT AWARD 

The Pennyroyal Amateur 
Radio Society will be operating 
portable from the Jefferson 
Davis Memorial Park on June 3, 
1978. This certificate will be 
issued to any amateur pre- 
senting written confirmation of 
contact with a PARS member 
during the QSO period, or any 
ten KY amateurs during the 
year. Awards may be obtained 
by sending $2.00 and your QSL 
cards to PARS, PO Box 1077, 
Hopkinsville KY 42240. Your 
QSL cards will be returned with 
the award. The QSO period 
begins a! 14O0 GMT June 3 and 
ends 0500 GMT June 4. Fre- 
quencies to be monitored are 
as follows: Novice— 3.740, 
21.240, 28.104; Genera!— 3.970, 
7.270, 14.310, 28.610. 



Ham Help 



I am looking for a schematic 
and manual for a model H21-10 
Motorola handie-talhie. I will 
gladly pay for a photocopy. 

Robert D. Houlihan N9DH 

497 E. Second St. 

Gdlesburg IL 61401 

I am interested lln contacting 
a ham who shares my interests 
in radio and electronics and 
model railroading in order to 
set up a 40 meter sked. 

Paul Braun WD9GC0 

PO Box 32 

Steeleviire IL 62288 

I need schematics 5030089, 
5030494. 5030663. and for the 
ac P.S. for the ITT Mobile Tel. 
MT-600. 

Dick Haskin W6KEC 
149 Mauna Loa Dr. 
Monrovia CA 91016 

I would like to obtain the 
booklet **AN/ARC-2 Conver- 
sion/* written by Roy 
Pafenberg. I recently saw this 
advertised in the June, 1963, 73, 
I would also appreciate any 



info on any other articles writ- 
ten concerning the conversion 
of this radio. Any help would be 



greatly appreciated. 

John P. Centers 

514 3, Pine SL 

Wapakoneta OH 45395 



I would like to get 

schematic/service manuals for 



Hewlett-Packard model 150A 
scope and Hewlett-Packard 
model 400D ac VTVM. I am will- 
ing to pay a reasonable price 
for these manuals. 

John A, Popfawskt 

PO Box 1708 

KlUeen TX 76541 



Oscar Orbits 



O^ir 7 OrbitBl drTofniitron 



Qrbit 



The listed data tells you the time and place OSCAR crosses 
the equator in an ascending orbit for the first time each day. To 
calculate successive orbits, make a list of the first orbit number 
and the next twelve orbits for that day. List the time of the first 
orbit. Each successive orbit is 115 minutes later (two hours less 
five minutes). The chart gives the longitude of the first crossing. 
Add 29* for each succeeding orbit. When OSCAR is ascending 
on the other side of the world, it will descend over you. To find 
the equatorial descending longitude, subtract 166 degrees from 
the ascending longitude. To find the time it passes the North 
Pole, add 29 minutes to the time it passes the equator. You 
should be abte to hear OSCAR when it is within 45 degrees of 
you. The easiest way to do this is to take a globe and draw a cir- 
cle with a radius of 2480 mites (4000 kilometers) from the home 
QTH, If it passes right overhead, you should be able to hear it for 
about 24 minutes total. OSCAR will pass an Imaginary tine drawn 
from San Francisco to Norfolk about 12 minutes after passing 
the equator. Add about a minute for each 200 miles that you live 
north of this line. If OSCAR passes 15 degrees from you, add 
another minute; at 30 degrees, three minutes; at 45 degrees, ten 
minutes. Mode A: 145.85-.95 MHz uplink, 29.4 29.5 MHz downlink, 
beacon at 29.502 MHz, Mode B: 432.125-.175 MHz uplink, 
145.975%925 MHz downlink, beacon at 145.972 MHz, 



)B2Q3 Bbn 
m2l5 Afan 
16229 etm 
16240 Bbn 
162&3 Abn 
18265 Bbfi 
16378 Bbfi 
16291 Abn 
1(3303 Bbfi 
16316 Bbn 
1632SAbn 
T6341 Shfi 
16353 abn 
16366 Abn 
16378 Sbrr 
16301 Bbn 
16403 Abn 
16416 Bbn 
l642SBbn 
16441 Abn 
16453 Bbn 
lB446Qbn 
16476 Abn 
16491 B 
I6&04 3fd 
165^6 Abn 
16529 Bbn 
16&41 Bton 
16554 Abn 
16566 Bbn 



CJuno] 



T 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
B 
10 

n 

13 

14 
16 
16 
17 
IB 
13 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
2S 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



lime 
(GMT) 



0114:48 

0014:09 

0108:26 

0007-46 

0102:04 

0001:24 

005&'41 

0149:59 

0049:19 

0143:37 

0042:57 

0!57:I4 

0036:35 

0130^52 

0030; 13 

0124^30 

0023:50 

0118:08 

001 7:28 

0111:46 

0011^06 

0105:23 

0004:44 

0059:01 

0T&3: \B 

0052:39 

0146:56 

0046:17 

0140:34 

0039:54 



l.{)iigitudti 
otEq. 
Cfosini W 

7a3 

61,2 

74.7 

59l6 

73.2 

56.0 

71.6 

85.2 

70 J 

83. S 

68.5 

621 

66.9 

80.5 

65l4 

7a3 

63.B 

77.A 

62-2 

75,S 

60.7 

74.3 

59.1 

12.7 

86.3 

71,1 

84.7 

B9.6 

8a2 

6&Q 



188 



We Guarantee... 

she won't answer your phone call (as nice as that might 
be!) But we do guarantee every phone call and letter 
will be handled by an active. Licensed Ham with years of 
experience- 



Ray WB4DXH Pudge W4LTX Jim WA4CDX Bill WD4LGF 

Together we have more than 50 years experrence in Ham Radio. 

Call us and see why if you're not buying from us. 

We^re Losin' and You>e Losin. 




1. Credit cards Welcome {except "cash deals") 

2. Trades invited* 

3. Fast — to your door — delivery via UPS. 

4. large inventory of major lines — most items ore in stock NOWl 

5. Send for our free cotolog. 

6. Cost of telephone coHs will be deducted from your order, 

7. We're ''burning'' to moke Hot Deals at A,R,S.O,N., Inc. 



Yes!! Now we are authoriied dealers for 





We also carry: 

Yaesu • Drake • ICOM • Dentron • HyGain • Wilson • Ten-Tec 

Tempo • Swan • Standard • KLM • Larsen • Cushcraft 

Newtronics (Hustler) • B & W • CDE • Shure • NYE 

Pipe • Beldon and others. 




mataur Radio Supply of Nashvilla, Inc. 



Store Hoyr« 
Mon. - Fri* 
9 a*ni. - 5 p 

Sun, 

South Gallatin Road. Madison, Tennessee 371 15 Phone (615) 868-4956 l p.m, - 6 p.m 



NOW! The some policies and products in Atlanta .... 

Cal K4JSR Lee WA4HUG Jerry WB4VPJ 



mateur Radio Supply of North Atlanta, Inc. 




A4D 



Ptnetree Plo^a Shopping Center # 5269-6 Buford Highway, Doraville, GA 30340 • (405) 455-1771 



NASHVILLE 615-868-4956 



ATLANTA 404-455-1771 



189 



Nen^ Products 



from psge 19 

The top-of-the^iine SST T*2 
Ultra Tuner tunes out swr on 
any coaxfed or random wire 
antenna. It works great on all 
liands (60-10 meters) with any 
transceiver running up to 200 
Watts output. Because of its 
small size (6V4" x av*" x 2W\ 
the Ultra Tuner ts ideal for 
mobile and portable as weH as 
home installations. 

The T-2 Ultra Tuner Is housed 
in an attractive bronze finished 
enclosure, SO-239 coax con- 
nectors are used for transmit- 
ter Input and coaxfed anten- 
nas. Convenient binding posts 
are provided for random wire 
and ground connections. 

The SST T^2 Ultra Tuner sells 
for $39-95. 

The SST T-1 Random Wire 
Antenna Tuner is the original 
small tuner. It will load up a ran- 
dom wire on all bands (160-10 
meters) with any transceiver 
running up to 200 Watts output. 
The T<1 is great for apartments 
and hotel rooms — simply run a 
wJre inside, out a window, or 
anyplace available. The T-1 
features a neon tune-up in- 
dicator, SO-239 connector, and 
a compact (4-1/4" x 2-3/8" x 3") 
bronze-finished enclosure. It 
sells for $29 95. 

The SST T-3 Mobile Imped- 
ance Transformer matches 52 
Ohm coax to the lower imped- 
ance of a mobile whip or ver* 



tlcal. It has a 12-position switch 
with taps spread between 3 and 
50 Ohms. The T-3 uses an effi- 
cient toroid inductor for small 
size: 2y/' x 2" x 2 V*". It sells for 
$1 9.95. 

All SST products carry a 1 
year unconditional guarantee 
and may be returned within 10 
days for a full refund if you are 
not satisfied for any reason. To 
order, call (213)-376-5887, or 
mail to: SST Electronics. PO 
Box i, Lawndafe, Caiifomm 
90260. 

MIDLAND INTRODUCES 

MOBILE AMATEUR 

ANTENNAS 

Midland International Cor* 
poration's Communications 
Division has announced the in- 
troduction of four newiy- 
designed mobile radio anten- 
nas for the amateur radio en- 
thusiast. Specifically designed 
and factory tuned for operation 
with 1 .5:1 or better vswr on the 2 
meter (144 MHz-148 MHz) or 220 
meter (220 MH2-225 MHz) ama- 
teur band, the antennas are 
base loaded, with precision 
wound and sealed loading 
coils. 

Offered In either trunk/ roof 
mount Of magnet mount 
models, the 2 meter and 220 
meter antennas feature a 
stainless steel whip and 17 feet 
of coaxial cable with connector 
and weather-resistant, plated 
hardware. The trunk/roof 




9 




I 




The portable Magnet mount model 18-941 ^ 2 meter mobile anlen- 

na from Midf&nd. 



mount antennas (modal 1S-940, 
950) clamp on the trunk lid lip or 
hatchback without drilling 
holes for mounting. The mag- 
net mount antennas (models 
16-941, 951) are prewired and 
feature heavy-duty, 5 oz, 
magnetic bases to hold the 
antenna securely at highway 
speeds. All four antennas are 
designed to give 3 dB gain in 
either the transmit or receive 
mode. 

For further information on 
Midland's full line of 2 meter 
and 220 meter amateur radios 
and accessories, contact; Pat 
O'Malley, National Marketing 
Manager for Amateur Radio, 
Communications Division, 
Midland International Corpora- 
tion, PO Box 1903, Kansas City, 

Missouri 641 4t (913)-384'4200. 



PALOMAR^S 
LOOP ANTENNA 

A new receiving antenna for 



the 80 and 160 meter amateur 
bands, the broadcast, and the 
VLF band has been introduced 
by Paiomar Engineers. 

The loop rotates 360' in 
azimuth and ±90'ineievationj 
with calibrated scales for both. 
The elevation or "tilt'" of the 
loop is a new feature of the 
Paiomar Engineers design and 
gives much deeper nulls than 
ordinary direction-finder loops. 

Loop nulls are very sharp on 
local and ground wave signals, 
but are broad or nonexistent on 
distant sky wave signals. This 
allows local interference to be 
eliminated while DX stations 
can still be heard from all direc- 
tions. 

The loop picks up much less 
noise than the usual trans- 
mitting antenna. This, along 
with its ability to null out 
specific interfermg signals, im* 
proves reception considerably, 

A loop amplifier serves as 
the mounting base for the 




FttEQUENCY COUNTia 



^00.3 I8HB 






04Jt 





The loop antenna from Paioman 



Davis 500 MHz and 1 GHz frequency counter. 



190 



antenna. It contains a toning 
capacitor to resonate tlie loop 
and an amplifier to boost the 
signal and preserve the liigh 
"Q" ot the loop. The loop anten- 
na plugs into the amplifier: 

Ptugnn loops are available 
for 160/80 meters (1600^5000 
kHz), broadcast band (550-1600 
kHz), and VLF (150-650 kHz). 

The loop amplifier Is $67.50 
and the plug-In loops are $47.50 
each. Add S2 shipping/han- 
dling. 

A free descriptive brochure Is 
available from Palomar Engi- 
neers, PO Box 455, Escondldo 
CA 92025, 



LOW-COST, PROFESSIONAL- 
QUALITY DAVIS 500 MHz AND 
1 GHz FREQUENCY 
COUNTERS INTRODUCED 

A versatile series of profes- 
sionaJ-quaMty, low-cost 500 
MHz and 1 GHz frequency 
counters — designed for 
reliability and high accuracy In 
communications, engineering 
labs, and general electronics 
applications — has been intro- 
duced by Davis Electronics. 

Covering the entire frequen- 
cy spectrum to 1000 MHz. the 
Davis CTR-2A series of wide- 
range VHF-UHF frequency 
counters combines a 50 MHz 
(100 MHz In model CTR- 
2A-1000) counting range with 
built-fn prescaler and pre^ 
amplifier; a period measure- 
ment option is available to fur- 
ther extend usefulness of the 
CTR-2A series. Affofdable 500 
or 1000 MHz versions come 
either factory-assembled or in 
kit form (for even greater sav- 
ings) and all CTR-2A models 
measure a compact 8,8" x 8" x 
2,8", weighing only 2 lbs. 10 

D2S. 



Superior features IncTude 
8'digit display, built-in VHF- 
UHF preamp and prescaler^ 
high stability TCXO timebase, 
automatic input limiting, pro- 
tected input, and automatic Dp 
placement. Selectable gate 
times are 0.1 and 1 sec. (10 sec. 
optional), with resolution to 1 
Hz (or 0.1 Hz with 10 sec. op- 
tion). Available low-cost op- 
tions are oven crystal, 12 V dc 
operation, 10 sec. timebase, till 
handle, oversize digital display 
(.43'' versus .3"), and period 
measurement. 

Mode! CTR-2A'500 covers a 
frequency range from 10 Hz to 
512 MHz, and the CTFI-2A^ 
lOOO's range is 10 Hz to 1000 
MHz. Input impedance for both 
models is 1 megohm/20 pF 
(direct) and 50 Ohms {pre- 
scaled). CTR-2A-500 sensitivity 
(direct) is 10 mV @ 25 MHz, 30 
mV @ 50 MHz, while the CTR* 
2A-1000 is 50 mV @ 100 MHz; 
sensitivity (prescaled) is 50 mV 
@ 500 MHz for model GTR- 
2A'500 and 50 mV @ 1000 MHz 
for the CTR*2A^1000. Maximum 
sale input is 120 Vrms to 10 
MHz, 2.5 V @ 500 MHz, while 
accuracy is ± 1 count ± 
timebase accuracy. Timebase 
specifications include a crystal 
frequency of 10.000 MHz (stan- 
dard TCXO or optional oven 
crystal) and setability of ,2 ppm 
(TCXO) or ,1 ppm (oven crystal). 

The 500 MHz kit {CTR-2A- 
500K) with TCXO costs $249.95, 
while the 1000 MHz kit (CTR-2A- 
1000K) with TCXO is S399.95. 
Kits come complete with all 
parts, drilled and plated- 
through glass PC boards, 
cabinet, switches, and hard- 
ware, plus detailed assembly 
manual and calibrating instruc- 
tions. Assembly time Is about 8 




Panasonic's new long-life lithium batteries. 



hours; all parts are guaranteed 
90 days and factory service is 
available, if needed, at $25.00 
plus shipping. 

Factory*assembled units 
cost $349.95 for 500 MHz (CTR- 
2A-500A) and $549.95 for 1000 
MHz (CTR^2A'1000A). Factory 
units are calibrated to spec- 
ifications and guaranteed for 
one year; the transformer is 
guaranteed for life. Shipping 
cost is $2.00 extra. 

Options are (01) handle 
$10.00, (02) oven crystal $49.95, 
(03) ,43'^ digits $10.00, (04) 12 V 
dc $15.00< (05) 10 sec, timebase 
$5.00, and (06) period measure- 
ment $15,00. For further infor- 
mation, contact: Da\/is Elec- 
tronics, B36 Sheridan Drive, 
Dept. 608, Tonawanda, New 
York 14150. (7ie}-874-5348. 



NEW SIZE LONG-LIFE 

LITHIUM 

BATTERY INTRODUCED BY 

PANASONIC 

A new coin-size long-life 
lithium battery is now available 



from Panasonic Company. The 

new battery joins the previous- 
ly announced coin lithium bat* 
teries by Panasonic for men's 
digital watches and calcu- 
lators. 

The new battery has the 
same profile as the other coin 
units <0.098" thick), but it offers 
a smaller diameter— 0.785" ver- 
sus 0.906". This reduction in 
size will enhance its accep- 
tance in small digital watches 
and miniature calculators. 

Nominal voltages of the new 
battery are at the S^voit level 
and their capacities are in ex- 
cess of 90 mAh. The cells are 
hermetically sealed and their 
shelf life is in excess of five 
years. 

Prices of the new cells are 
compalfbie with the prices for 
silver oxide watch cells that the 
new units are expected to be 
replacing (one new lithium cell 
replaces two silver oxide units). 
OEM quantity prices are avail- 
able on request. Panasonic 
Company, One Panasonic Way, 
Secaucus NJ 07094. 



Ham Help 



May I have your assistance, 

please. I am planning some 
redesign and modernization of 
my general coverage com- 
munications receiver, it ap- 
pears that if high performance 
is to be achieved, commercial 
filter modules are practically 
necessary. Correct? Therefore, 
my question; 

Can someone please supply 
the names and addresses of 
source candidates for ob* 
tatning one or two piece orders 
of such fibers at less than max- 
imum cost. Any hints for re- 
ducing the cost of these parts 
will be appreciated. 

I had suspected that current 
receiver manufacturers would 
be a possibility; however, (earn- 
ing the specifrcations of the 
units and who uses what would 
be a miserable chore, 

I have left the M frequency 




choice open until I see the 
prices of suitable units. My 
preliminary choice for pass* 
bandwidths are approximately 
2.5 and 10 kHz. 

A, Kubicz W81GJ 

Box 141 

Golden CO 60401 



I would like to ask for the 
benefit of whatever experience 
may be out there in the use of 
synthesizers and touchtone 
pads with walkie-talkies. 

I would like to know, par* 
ticuiarly, which brands of pads 
have particularly good, or par- 
ticularly bad; ryggedness and 
reliability. My walkie-talkie is a 
Motorola HT-220 with Omni 
back. It's fully gasketed and 
essentially watertight. Are 
there any pads which can be 
mounted on it in such a way 



that NT and pad are both 
sealed tight? 

I hear there's a synthesizer 
designed specifically to go into 
this unit, but t haven't been able 
to track it down. Who makes it, 
and how good is it? Has anyone 
successfully mounted a GLB 
synthesizer board Inside with- 
out sacrificing the water- 
tightness of the case or adding 
buiges, and what problems 
were encountered? 



A related item: Has anyone 
come up with an antenna con- 
nector for the HT'220, other 
than the oversize kluge box 
Motorola makes strictty for 
tune-up purposes? I have a ten- 
tative solution, but a machine 
shop is required to build the 
screw-in adapter for the anten- 
na hole. 

John A, Carroll WB1AVV 
25 Evergreen Ave. 
Bedford MA 01 730 



Corrections 



73 readers interested In ob- 
taining the USCG Loran-C User 
Handbooff should write to 
Loran-C Information Project, 
USCG (GWAN^3), Washington 
DC 20590 (phone (202)^426- 
0990). This will result in a 
quicker response than the ad- 
dress given in 73 for April, 1978, 



XjUTZX- 



/97rl 



in the "Loran-C Receiver, part 
I" article. Also, the U.S. Naval 
Observatory now has a rec- 
orded daily message on time 
difference and phase value, ob- 
tained by dialing (202)- 
254-4662, 

Ralph W. Burhans 
Athens OH 

191 



ALL PRICES INCLUDE FREtGHT PREPAID ANYWHERE IN CONTINENTAL USA 




INDUSTRIES 



ELECTRONfC COMPONENTS 
EQUiPMENT HARDWARE 
1922 N.E. UBth STREET 

N. MtAMt, FLA, 33181 
{305} 947 1479 



ZENER DIODES 



5.tV400mw 5% 

Z2\i 400mw 5% 

11V 1w 5% 

Any 10--1 value 
$1,00— $,15 each 



MYLAR CAP 



DIODES 



WestCap-Axial 

1,5 mF -"400V 

2/1.00 



POiYSTYRENE CAPS AXfAL ilf CTROLYTICS 



6200 

7500 
7500 
12000 
15000 
15000 
12000 



pF 


33V 5% 


PF 


33V 5% 


pF 


100V 5% 


pF100V5% 1 


pF 


33V 5% 


pF 100V 5% 


pF 


33V 5% 


IWI.OO 



METERS 



Weston #131 
Edgewise-Panel 

0-100 ya dc 
Retails for over 

$30.00 
$6.95 ea. 



LAMPS/BULBS 



NE'2 Long Lead 

Chic. mm. #327 

Your Choice 

10/$ 1.00 



BOURNS TRIMPOT 



#200L 1-201 m 

200 Ohm 

S.25 ea 

2 FOR 2 25 

3 FOR 3.00 



50/100 V $.25 ea. 
150n05 V $.50 ea. 
220/25 V $,25 ea 
330/60 V $50 ea- 
400/75 V $.50 ea 
500/50 V $.50 ea. 
1000/50 V $.75 ea 
2000/25 V S 50 ea 



TRANSISTORS 



2N914 .30 

2N2222 25 

2N3055 .50 

2N3725 .90 

2N3905 4/rOO 

2N3906 4/1.00 

2N 5086 4/1,00 



TRANSISTORS 



House No. 

2N 1991 PNP 

2N 1984 NPN 

.10 sa .. 

10/1.25 



HANDLES 



Cambion #1252-1 

BrasS'fiickle 
Firush— 3" mtg. 
Centers— Retail 

$4.95 
your cost $1,00 



IN4000 
IN 4001 
IN 4002 
IN 4003 
IN4004 
IN4005 
IN4006 
IN4007 



12/1.00 
12/1.00 
12/1.00 
12/1.00 
12/1,00 
10/1.00 
10/1,00 
10/1-00 



REED RELAY 



GordoS'F811156 

2000 Ohm Coil 

SPST No 

-Special- 

$1.25ed 
2/2.00 



TIMING MOTORS 



Haydon 

120VeOC4RPM 

5W or 2.5W 

Your Choice 

RFE 



FUSES 



LIttlefuse 3AG 
ViA 250 V 
^/bA250V 

m .00 



TRANSFORMER SIGNAL DIODE 



Input 120 V 
@ 60 Hz 
with Elec- 
trostatic sfTield 

t.> 30V tap al 4V 2A 
31 30V tap bMV 2A 



7 3EG LED 



Tl L322P 

5 ' BED 

common cathode 

$1.10 ea 

2/2.00 



BATTERY HOLDERS 



Keystone #140 
Dual AA Size 

.35 ea 

3/1.00 

10/2,50 



PAMEL LIGHT ASS^V DIPPED TANTALUM 



Grimes #A7075-5 

Blue w/cap ^ 

all hardware 

4/$1.00 



MIN. TRANSFORMER 



Primary 400 Ohm 

Secondary— 

300 Ohm 

.60 ea 

2/1 .00 



WHAT'S IT 



We don"! know 

but maybe you 

do. Has motors 

gears, micro Switch 

-RFE $1.50 



.1/35 V 
,15/35 V 
,22/35 V 
33/35 V 
.68/35 V 
1 .0/35 V 



) 



$.25 


each 


10/ 


$2.25 



DIODE 



Microwave Diode 

IN23B— Sylvania 

100MC— 150KMC 

$.60 

2/roo 



TIP PLUGS 



Red and Black 

.12 each 

10/1,00 

25/2.00 



RF DEVICES 



Special This 

Month Only 

2N— 5590 

$5.95 



COUNTERS 



Veeder Root 
120V 50/60 Cycle 

5 place— approx. 

1V4"W X V'H 3< 2"L 

•RFE $2,50 



DISC CAPS 



.01^ 100V 

%" Lead Spacing 

ARCO TCP ROi 

20/$ 1.00 



1N4148 

20 for $1.00 

50 for $2,00 

100 tor $3.00 

250 tor $6.00 

500 for $10.00 

1000 for $18.0' 



Circuit Breaker 



Littlefuse #230 
3.0 A Hold 

5/1.00 



FUSE CLIPS 



Uttlefuse#1 01002 

for 3AG Fuses 
25/1.00 

100/3.00 



CAPS— T.L 



2000 mF— 30V 
lOOOmF— 35 V 

2000m F— 60V 
80m F— 350V 
125mF— 450V 

.60 each 



RESISTORS CO 



V4W^5% 
Ay Value 
20—1.00 
50—2.00 

100—3.50 
Pl&ase State Value 



POTS 



CTS Vj" Bushing 
14" shaft 
10K— $.35 

100K— $.35 

4 meg/40K dual 

$75 



RESISTORS 



Assorted bag 

of lOOpeices 

Most popular 

values— V4 & Vj w 

1.95/bag 
2/$3-50 



TRANSFORMER 



Constant voltage 

115/220 V in. 

40VCT1.3Amp 

20VCT2Amp 

$2,95 each 
2/$5.00 



SLIDE SWITCH 



.5 Amp— 125 V ac/dc 

2 pole— 3 pos. 

Has holes for 

mounting w/ ^W' 

mtg. center 

.12 10/1.00 



BLOWERS 






Open frame type motor, 
quick connect terminals. 



Input: 1M V, 6GH2, 

too Watts Rate^ 

120 CFM sft "0 " Static 

pressure Siza: 

Inter, 3"k8^t": 



Outlet, 2" se%" 
OTA Size 1T-^" 
long X S'V^" % 

^w eibs 



MICRO SWITCH MICRO SWITCHES 



#BA-2RV137T 

20A 125V or 480V 

lOA-l25Vac 

1 HP@ 125Vac 

2 HP ® 250 Vac 



CONNECTORS 



PL 269 

SO 239 

Your Choice 

.65 



KESTER SOLDER 



63/3? or 60/40 
1 lb. spools .032D 

$7,25/lb. 



PISTON CAP 



JFD#VC*24G 

1 to 30 mF 

.75 

2/1.25 



BANANA PLUG 



Red or Black 

.30 

4/1.00 

10/2,25 



BINDING POST 



5 Way Red 
5 Way White 
Your Choice 

.40 ea 
3/1.00 






NeW'pulled 
from equip, 

assorted sizes 

consists of E-33's, 

£ j^ s eiCii 



RIBBON CABLE ASSEMBLY 



Has PC, Board with 56 pin 
edge cor^nector and 2 

lengths of 2Va' 40 conductor 
ribbon cable with 2 ea, 40 
pin connectors new $2.95 



TRANSISTOR MOUNTINQ FAD 



Milton Ross #10044 
100—2.95 
250—3 95 

500-4,95 



UNI VAC PC Bd ASSEMBLY 



Has 14 mot. SCI 421 1L 

90TISN2ai88J 

32FairFSA28l2M 

32 Fair FSA 281 3M 

3 56 pin connectors 

19 Beckman Pts. 
Plus: Over 200 other 

parts to include 

tantalum caps, etc. 

ICs with fun leads 

easily removed. Cost 

Univac over $1900.00 

New $16.96 only 50 



BOURNS TRIMPOT 



#3260H 10K~10Turn 
V»" Square — Wirewound 

Retails for $11.55 

Special this month only 

$6.95 



TERMSr Orders under $15.00 add 2.00 for handling— cods accepted with 25% deposit ofi orders over $25.00. Fla. residents add 4% sales tax— 
all material fully guaranteed. *rfe-remov«d from eqyipm«n1 



JIG 



192 



PLETE SATISFACTION IS OUR GUARANTEE YOUR COMPLETE SATISFACTION IS OUR GUARANTEE YOUR COMPLETE SATISFACTION 



Huge Discounts! 




vdji 



nm 



1 



i 



WAMECO 



-^ 



KITS 

S-lOO RC. Boards 
8K RAM 2S.OO 

8080 CPU 28 00 

i2-Slot Mother 

Board 33.00 

ITHACA AUDtO S-lOO RC. Boards 

SK RAM 28.00 

Z'80 CPU 28.00 

SOLID STATE MUSIC S-100 Kits & 

Bare Boards 
MB-3 2K/4K EPROM 

Uses 1702A EPROMS 
Kit w/o EPROMS 59.95 

MS-4 4K STATIC RAM Kit 9500 

Bare Board 25.95 

MB6ABK Krt 129,96 

STATIC RAM Bare Board 25.95 



Savrngs up to 70% on major brand IC parts and computer 
kits. For complete IC listings write for our catalog. 




MB7 16K STATIC RAM 
Kit 375.00 

Bare Board 25. 95 

MB8 8K/16K EPROM 
Uses 2708 s 
Kit Less EPROMs 7595 






fC 



KITS 

SOLID STATE MUSIC 

MB9 STATrC PROM/RAM 

Kit Less Memory 
VBIBVIDEO INTERFACE 

Kit 

Bare Board 
f02 PARRELL I/O 

And Kludge 

Kit 

Bare Board 

I04 2 + 2 I/O Kit 

SYNTHESIZER SB-1 MUSIC 
Kit with 

Software 

MT-1 



72.00 

129.95 
25.95 



74L$00 TTL 



74L*00 


21 


74L$I3« 


70 


?4L*02 


2\ 


74Lil39 


70 


74LS04 


.24 


74LS151 


65 


?4L$0d 


t\ 


74LS1S3 


66 


74LSiO 


21 


74LS154 


t oo 


741*14 


Bb 


74LS1S7 


6? 


74LS?0 


23 


74LSI60 


m 


74 L SSI 


23 


74LSJ6I 


m 


74t %22 


23 


74LSi62 


82 


;4LS30 


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74L Si 63 


B2 


74LS32 


30 


74LS164 


,98 


74i$37 


31 


74U174 


.7S 


74LS3H 


31 


J'4LSi7St 


.79 


ML 14 2 


60 


74ill90 


90 


74LS4 7 


7% 


74LS191 


30 


74i*4a 


ft 


74Li|92 


90 


74Lt73 


35 


74Lil9& 


dO 


74LS74 


35 


74LSi9? 


BO 


74LS?5 


53 


74LS221 


1 06 


74tS76 


37 


74 L $25 7 


.71 


74 L tee 


36 


74LS2Se 


,70 


74LS90 


52 


74LS2SB 


26 


74Lt92 


52 


74Lf2S3 


72 


74L«9a 


52 


74 L $365 


55 


^3LS105 


3€ 


74Lf366 


55 


^^L*n:? 


36 


74Lf367 


55 


74LSn3 


36 


74LS366 


55 


741, St 14 


36 


74LS3a6 


39 


74LS125 


46 


B1L£9S 


77 


74LS126 


46 


B1LS96 


77 


74LS132 


.7b 


S1L197 


.77 






e]L$98 


77 



BOOKS 

The BASIC Workbook 
Progra m m i n g Pro v e rbs 
Discovering BASIC 
COBOL with StyJe 
Advanced BASIC 
Basic BASfC 
Standard Dictionary of 

Computers & Intormation 

Processing 
Game Playing witfi Computers 
Game Playlrig with BASIC 
Introduction to BASIC 
Home Computers: 2lOQuestrons 
a nO Art £ we rs Vol um e 2 : Soft wa re 
Mirticomput^rs 
Microcomputer Dictionary 

and Gujde 
Microprocessors 
Microprocessor Basics 
Modern Data CommunicatiorrS 
Home Computers: 210 Questkans 
and Answers Volume I; Hardware 
Understand! rtg Integrated Circuits 



S5.50 
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695 
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4.95 



BOOKS 



Semiconductor Circuit 

Elements 
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Digital Signal Analysts 
Digital Troubleshooting 
110 CMOS Digital IC Projects 
Fundamentafs and Apphcations 

of Digital Logic Circuits 
400 Ideas tor Design, Volume 2 
Analysis and Design of 

Dfgitai Circuits and 

Computer Systems 
Finite Stale Fantasies 
Telephone Accessories 

Vbu Can Build 
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lor Tole|3hone Systems 
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How to Get the Most Out of 

Your Low -Cost Electronic 

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Calculator Users Guide 

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6-95 

a 95 

19.95 

9.95 

5.95 

7.95 
13.75 



22. 50 

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12.95 



4995 
25 95 

139.95 

145.00 

15-Slot Mother 

Board 39.95 

XB-1 EXTENDER BOARD 

Bare Board 8,99 

SSM 8080 MONITOR VI 

ON 2-2708 47,00 

ON8-1702A 47,00 



74XX 




SUPPORT DEVICES 



6820 


8.O0 


6850 


' 8.0O 


8212 


3.45 


8214 


8,00 


8216 


3,75 


8224 


3.50 


8228 


6.25 


8226 


3.85 


8238 


7.95 



"« 









MEMORY 

1702A 3.75 

2708 12,50 

2716 22.50 

2lL02 45Ons 1^5 
2lL02 25€n5 1.60 
ilOl .50 

2114 8.50 

MICROPROCESSOR 
80S0A 11,50 

2-80 24 95 

Z-SOA 34 95 

6800 16.50 



CMOS 




4025 
402S 
4030 
40JS 

404(a 
4050 
4051 
4052 
405.1 
4066 
4071 
40fil 
40B2 
4507 
4510 



74 
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99 
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59 
19 
2Z 
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39 
105 




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11 


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11 


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74*3 


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74141 
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74113 
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7*1 67 
74|ttl 
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74173 

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mastef ctiarge 



QAhlKAMfftiCARP 



l^/&4 



n Cash 
D COD 

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Your Price 

$46.00 




IS OUR GUARANTEE YOUR COMPLETE SATISFACTION tS OUR GUARANTEE YOUR COMPLETE SATISFACTION IS OUR GUARANTE 




Take Command of 220 MHz! 



79W^ 

<t m *, v. 

The Synthacoder 509 represents the fiisf of a 
lotflUy new generation of frequency synthast^ers. 
based on the laste^i adv^anc^s in CMOS LSI techni- 
que"^, 'Matrix Modules", which contain progTan^m- 
ing diodes, make adding new channek d cinch. 
Shnplv ^nip the leads on the diodes not needed, 
plug it in, and you are Oti The AirlOur unique in- 
terface design allows you to qse your existing 
crystal po5ifk>ns even though the synthesizer has 
been instalfedv The Synthacoder is also easily 
adapted for Scmnlng and External Frec|tieii€V 
Control. To sum U up--We are sure ihai you will 
fmd the new Synthacoder 509 Everything Yoa 
Want in a 220 MH; synthesij?er— And at a Price 
Comparable to Cry^iaUl 



* SIMPLE TO INTERFACE - Three wires and no holes! 

* FULL COVERAGE ^ 220-225 MHz in 20 KHz steps 

* MATRIX PROGRA>WABLE - No more cry stab 

* EXCLUSIVE ^^MATRIX MODULES" - Program in seconds 

* FULL MODE CO]NrraOt'> Simplex, Repeater. Reverse 

* LOW POWER CMOS * Drawi <>nty 6G ma 

* FULLY ASSEMBLED AND CALfBRATED ^ Not a krt 

* Fits MIDLAND^ COBRA, and CLEGG 220 MHz transceivers 



Enghieeriug Specialties 

F*0 BOX 2233 
1247 COMMERCIAL AVENUE 
OXNARD. CA 93030 
7^R (805) 486-0317 



O I*LL BTTE! Please send moT« SnCo, 

D I'M HOOKED* Please RUSH my SyntMcoder. 



VES, 1 would bke ^o ptuchase a SynlhAcoder for my 220 fadio 
Endcioed please 6rtd my $129.95 (PHoe intdude^ pofstagt? and handing. 
CaMomia r^stdents add 6% sales tax. 

$ ,^^^^^^ enclosed. D Check D Money Order 

Pie &se charge my H Master Charge D BankAmencard 

CredU card *f ^__ ^ , -: / ■■ 

Expir^!k>n date 

Stgnature . . ,— 



I 
1 
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'■'■J -.J^s-y 



Address 



.i^^ State 



U*t.in\fiUM 



^ Zi|l _ 



E12 



194 



GET YOUR 



NEW 



RADIO AMATEUR 





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The U.S. Callbook has over 
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Specialize in DX? Then you're 
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Inlemalional Postal InformaNofi! 
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Save SI -50 order both send S30.40 



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r 



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ORDER FORM 




item _^ 


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Like BIyfl. \l\ 60044 

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Charge: DBankAm^iicard 
Credit card # 



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Tout 

Enclosed, 



DMaia^er Charge Jnlerbaiili # 



Expiistion date. 



195 



^^^ 








1 




DIODES/ZENERS 


SOCKETS/BRIDGES 


TRANSISTORS, LEDS,etc. 






1N9t4 


lOOv 10mA .05 


8-prn pcb .25 ww ,45 


2N2222A NPN i2N2222 Plastic .10} 


J 5 




1 N4O05 


600v t A .08 


14'pin pcb .25 ww .40 


2N2907A PNP 
2M3906 PNP (PlastSd 


.15 
JO 




1 N4007 


lOOQv 1A .15 


16-pin pcb .25 WW .40 


2N3904 NPN (Plastlcl 


.10 




1N4148 


75v 10mA .05 


18-pin pcb .25 ww .75 


2N3054 NPN 


.38 




1N753A 


6.2v z .25 


22 pin pcb .45 ww 1.25 


2N3055 NPN ISA 60v 


.50 




1N758A 


lOv z .25 


24'pin pcb .35 ww 1.10 


TIP! 25 PNP Darfingiorv 
LED Gre«n, Red, Clear. Y«Mow 


.35 

.15 




1N759A 


1 2v z .25 


28-pin pcb .35 ww 1,45 


O.L.747 7 seg 5y'S" High com-anode 


1.95 




1N4733 


5Jv z .25 


40-pin pcb .50 ww 1.25 


XAN72 7 seg corn-anode (Red) 


1.25 




1N5243 
IN 5244 9 


1 3v z .28 
14v z ?5 


Molex pins .01 To-3 Sockets .45 


MAN71 7sBg com-anode (Red) 
MAN3610 7«g corrvanode (OrangeJ 


1.25 
1.25 




1 m*^i'^'**D 

1N5245B 


1 *rV JL .^hJ 

16v z .25 


2 Amp Bridge 100-prv 1.20 


M AN82A 7 seg com-arK>d@ [ Yel low) 
WAN74A Tsegcom-cathode iRed) 


1,25 
1.50 








25 Amp Bridge 200-prv 1 .95 


rND359 7 ssg corn-cathode I Red} 


1.2S 


CMOS 


- T T L - 






4000 


.15 


7400 .15 


7473 .25 


74176 1.25 


74H72 .45 


74S133 


.40 




4001 


-15 


7401 .15 


7474 ,30 


, 74180 .75 


74H101 J5 


74S140 


.55 




4002 


,20 


7402 .20 


7475 .35 


74181 2.25 


74H103 J5 


74S151 


.30 




4004 


3,95 


7403 .20 


7476 .40 


74182 .95 


74HI06 .95 


74S153 


.36 




4006 


.95 


7404 .15 


7480 .55 


74190 1.75 




74S157 


.75 




4007 


,35 


7405 .25 


7481 .75 


74191 1,05 


74 LOO .25 


74S158 


.30 




4008 


.95 


740G .35 


7483 .95 


74192 .75 


74L02 .25 


74S194 


1.05 




4009 


.45 


7407 .55 


7485 .75 


74193 .85 


74L03 .30 


745257(8123} 


1.05 




4010 


,45 


7408 .25 


7486 .25 


74194 1.25 


74L04 .30 








4011 


,20 


7409 .15 


7489 1.35 


7419S .95 


74L10 .30 


74 LSOO 


^5 




4012 


.20 


7410 .10 


7490 .55 ' 


74196 1.25 


74L20 .35 


74LS01 


.35 




4013 


,40 


741 1 .25 1 


7491 .96 


74197 1.25 


74L30 ,45 


74 LS02 


.35 




4014 


.95 


7412 .30 


7492 .95 


74198 2.35 


74L47 1.95 


74LS04 


.30 




4015 


.90 


7413 .35 


7493 ,35 


74221 1,00 


74L51 ,45 


74 LS05 


.45 




4016 


.35 


7414 1.10 


7494 .75 


74367 .85 


74L55 ,65 


74LS08 


.25 




4017 


1.10 


7416 .25 


7495 .60 




74L72 .45 


74 LS09 


.35 




4018 


1.10 


7417 .40 


7496 .80 


751 OBA JS 


74L73 .40 


74 LSI 


.35 




4019 


,50 


7420 .15 


74100 1-16 


75110 .36 


74L74 ,45 


74 LS1 1 


.35 




4020 


.85 


7426 .30 


74107 .36 


75491 .50 


74L75 .55 


74LS20 


.25 




4021 


1,00 


7427 .45 


74121 .35 


75492 .50 


74L93 .55 


74LS21 


.25 




4022 


.85 


7430 .15 


74122 *55 




74 LI 23 .85 


74LS22 


.25 




4023 


.25 


7432 .30 


74123 .55 


74HO0 -15 




74LS32 


,40 




4024 


,75 


7437 ,30 


74125 .45 


74 HOI .25 


74S00 .35 


74LS37 


,35 




4025 


.30 


7438 .35 


74126 .35 


74H04 .20 


74S02 -35 


74LS40 


.45 




4026 


1.95 


7440 .25 


74132 1-35 


74H05 .20 


74S03 .30 


74LS42 


1.10 




4027 


.50 


7441 1.15 


74141 .90 


74H08 .35 


74S04 ,30 


74LS51 


,50 




4028 


.95 


7442 .45 


74150 .85 


74H10 .35 


74 SOB .35 


74 LS74 


.65 




4030 


.35 


7443 .65 


74151 .65 


74H1 1 .35 


74S08 .35 


74LSB6 


.65 




4033 


1.50 


7444 .45 


74153 -75 


74H15 .45 


74S10 .36 


74LS90 


.95 




4034 


2,45 1 


7445 .65 


74154 .95 


74H20 .30 


74S1 1 .35 


74LS93 


.95 




4035 


1.25 


7446 .95 


74156 .95 


74H21 .25 


74S20 .35 


74LS107 


.85 ■ 




4040 


1.35 


7447 .95 


74157 .65 


74H22 .40 


74S40 .20 


74 LSI 23 


LOO 




4041 


,69 


7448 .65 


74161 .85 


74H30 .20 


74S50 .20 


74 LSI 51 


.96 




4042 


,95 


7450 .25 


74163 .85 


74H40 .25 


74S51 .25 


74 LSI 53 


t.20 




4043 


,96 


7451 .25 


74164 .60 


74H50 .25 


74S64 .20 


74 LSI 57 


.85 j 




4044 


,95 


7453 .20 


74165 1,50 


74H51 .26 


74S74 .35 


74 LSI 64 


1.90 




4046 


1.75 


7454 .25 


74166 1,35 


74H52 ,15 


74S112 ,50 


74LS367 


75 




4049 


.45 


7460 .40 


74 1 75 .80 


74H53J .25 


74S114 .65 


74LS368 


.75 




4050 


,45 


7470 .45 




74H55 .20 




74C04 


.25 




4066 
I 4069 


.95 
,40 


7472 ,40 








74C151 


2.25 










4071 


.35 


MCT2 .95 LINEARS, REGULATORS, etc. 






4081 


.70 


8038 3.95 


LM320T5 1 .65 


LM340K15 1.25 


LM723 


.50 




4082 


.45 


LM201 .75 


LM320T12 1.65 


LM340K18 1.25 


LM725N 


2.50 




MC 1 4409 


14,50 


LJV1301 .45 


LM320T15 1.65 


LM340K24 .95 


LM739 


1.50 




MCI 441 9 


4.85 


LM30B (mn\) .95 


LM324N .95 


78L05 Jb 


LM741 (3^141 .25 | 










LM309H .65 


LIV1339 .95 
7805 f340T5) .95 


78L12 .75 
78L15 .75 


LM747 
LM1307 


1.10 
1.25 1 




9000 SE=^R1FS 


LM309K(340K-5^85 




9301 ,85 


95H031.10 


LM310 1.15 


LM340T12 1.00 


78IV105 .75 


LM1458 


.95 




9309 .35 


9601 .45 


LM3nD(Mii,i) .75 


LM340T15 1.00 


LM373 2.95 


LM3900 


.50 




9322 .75 


9602 .45 


LIVI318tMinn ,95 


Liyi340T18 1.00 


LM380{a'i4PiN).95 


LM 7^451 


.65 








LM320K6{7905}1.66 


LM34nT24 95 


LM709{a,i4P(Nj.25 
LM7t1 .45 


NE555 
NE556 
NE565 


.50 

.95 1 

.96 




MICRO'S, RAMS, 
CPU'S, ETC. 


^^ ' ' ¥ *^ ^^ iLrf P V ^UF \ ' ^wf ^^ *J f T m ^-^ ^^ 

LM320K12 1.65 


LM340K12 1.65 








74S188 
' 1 702A 
MM5314 
MM 531 6 


3.00 
4.50 
3.00 

3.50 


INTEGRATED CIRCUITS UNLIMITED 


NE566 
NE567 


1.75 
1.35 








IS 




2102-1 T.45 
2102L-1 \Jb 
TR1602B 4,50 
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8080AD 12.00 
81 13 150 
8T23 rSO 


7889 Clairemont Mesa Boulevard, San Diego, California 92111 

(714) 278-4394 (Calif. ResJ DlfcoiNTS 
All orders shipped prepaid No minimum Total Order Deduct 
Open accounts invited COD orders accepted ^^pj ' |^q ^ ^ 




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2.00 


Discounts available at OEM Quamtttes California Residents add 6% Sales Tax $301 - $1000 15% 




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5it74JT 

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SJ474Sa 
SHr4Sl 
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s*rr4t« 

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SN746a 
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SN7480 

SN71S3 
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l.KO 




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1.75 


1.70 


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1.95 


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Hf-POW£R STUD RECTIFIERS 



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431 

7.S1 

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14.51 



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#0*15*0 iH> A B'f*^* 

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25 AMP BRIDGE 
RECTIFIERS 



br Cbl ^- ^^ ; 


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£MCk 


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1,70 


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3.00 


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230 


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25 AMP paw Eft 
STUD sens. TRIACS 

CmL ma. 64-144147 |tCi^) 
C«t Mfc 4A.«0««6A CTrt*Ci| 



□ 50 « .95 

n 100 US 

n 200 13ft 

□ 400 230 

a 



ic SALE 
2 f«r S .94 
2fw 1.26 
2Ur 1.94 
2^ 131 
2I» 



IN4000 Epomy Rectifiers 



» HiTtidtur*! 



C4(. N«. 

d4 2374 
eA2379 
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44 un 






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|iM0Q7 



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.T5 

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.90 
1J9 
1.39 



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20 
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for 
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for 
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1,00 

1.30 

1.4Q- 

130 



13 AMP 

BULLET RECTIFIERSI 

Or4*r by CmL Ha. 64i4BS4 ind voftJE* 



IJ 50V . 
D lOOV 

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C «00V 

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lOlarf^SS 
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20 for S.frO 
20 r&r .70 
20 lor 30 
20 for .90 
20 for 1.10 
20 hsr 1 JO 



mciro MtNi 

TOGGLE SWITCHESI 



3i Amp*. 12s VAC c«ttt*ct«. 
■mMh chrome Ti mdl**,. comptal* 
with mounting h ■ ritiir4i> fe. 



Cat. Mo 
C 44^936 
:- 64S0«S 
^ 644017 
~ 44 SOOT 



SPOT 
SPOT* 
Df^DT 
4PDT* 



Sal4 

»1,2« 

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2far 

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1.40 

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134 




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Ontor tor Cflt MD.flA Jt69 Md vMum 



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1: 20 



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15 

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35 

15 

15 



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P.C. 
P.C. 

Acitf 



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ftror 1.00 

tfpr 1.00 

«fH 1.00 

10 tv L.00 

10 f« Ml* 



IC SALE 

^0 i^r- Sl.Ol 

1« lor 1.01 



14 Isr 

12 Iw 
20 far 
20 foe 



J-01 
Ul 
1.01 
LOl 



6 AMP 



Cjit,eA3Sa4 

9 n so 

2 n 100 

-* Cl 200 

^ D 400 

5 = 600 

5 p too 

* P IMS 



CARTWHEEL 
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Ejch IC lALE 

S .3ti 2fi>r 5 3? 

.45 2 for >e 

31 2 lor 33 

.71 1 br 30 

30 2 Ivr .01 

1.1* 2 tor Uft 

U9 2lM l>iO 



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PRrCE 



HELPS nGHT INFLATION! 



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1- JOYSTICK, lour lOOK pat*, with ktkott (ii€&3«0SA> 

l — EECOmUMa WHEEL 5WITCR 0:CD, 0-7 (i6/t2BtOAl 

1 — O-TPtACK TAf>E TFUN SPORT, wHh proamp f^l&A^oiOl 

1-PLESSEV TV SIDEBAND ni.TER. 1^ cJ,«n. 3 or 4 (£4A39TS) 

S— TftAHSirORi 2N39a4 hiuaI. MPh, •wttidklirtf (»4AS^Ml 

t — MCmt, SOwA, 14' upofi O^aOA |a«A3T0S) 

1 — iPST SEIAT. MfB. «HK 12-24 VDC. 1250 *ii««. ^ ttrf* 1ieASiTS> 

1--VTOER IMMT CDUirttiT, QOO-999. f «««ttlU«. »m«cI ML t K^ASOft n 

2- DUAL GATE HOSrET. lim. to 3N20D. .JMttT, lor Rf A Wvor (?44Sioi| 

l-t-TRACM TAPE K£AD« *lth o-hig' n' cord ^: £41440) 

10 C AL C ULATDIt KET BOA RD5, 20 ti »ym 4iHi m^t « <e A3SZ4) 

15 SLIDE VOLUME CONTROLS, aastd valuct i0A3O5T> 

10.- CRYSTALS, iruy tnclud* CB. Hint « more {^43250) 

ISO MO LEX IC SDCMET&. on m str^. Ekrt to l*nmiiv |eAll441 

IQO TCffWINAL STRIPS. Irofn 2 his* i^ (eAJiSs} 

10 HC2HEOM LAMPS. «« 100% t**4|«A26 111 

40-*t. 5HIEL1»ED CABL^ 1 <w*4. inlk«. ph^wn 1 "4435 771 



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4V TEST iMEHCATDirS, t^m^^ gr^t^wbmM 1[mA3S3^t 

CAPACITOR SPECIAl. ifcc^ mff«r. ))rtic4. pwirc l4A271tJ 
Mini TRIInPOT&, to I iMt* 1 (urn- '^W ^44 314$) 
VOLTAGE RiaUtATOKS, hobby LM3Z0. 340, TO-3 i«AJ330) 



3D PANEL 5 WITC H ESr illdov roteiioi, mod. etc 1 6 A^2««l 

200 RESISTOR SPECIAL, '; to IW, cjirtwn, mtttml f«A30i4] 

300,^11 ALF WATTERS, ro^itor^ UriKin. mitel tSA i64Si 

IM PATIOMAit IC BOMAHEA ■*!««». 74CH>i ROWS ^6A2«60» 

40 HORST i.f OS, »«ld tri^t^ irhD»th u?r*blt {442:^59} 

15 LH:M«T VOLTACE RCCULATaO^S. 5 to Z4V. TO-220 »4A2«3^S) 

Ida Two WAITERS. rMi^tWO.. 1 iitm iHiitii ■■f1ii4 fiA3>3S} 

100 POLT5TTirEME C AP%. «««44 « pIwm., *«H*i«. |iM| iftA 2729 1 

59 TKERMISTOftS. rc«Jt1i»^ th^f ciMtvi* «rth tDmo (€A4009} 

20 RRIDGEl, unteattd, 2. 4, «. iO. JimfL. fui wav« L6A4022) 

2 S L AMP'N' $OC K ET SETS, ttrl^r^i, J 3 V. Ta 1643957 ) 

15 MIXED READOUTS, hubby, utiI««1«i(, ,127. 3, .5. otc |4A9fll9-> 

ISO QUARTER WATTERS. roftLstarm, m«tJii Him, marked (eA3413| 

100 PLASTIC TRANSISTORS, untMlnd. RO'92 l«A2«04i 

200 PRETDRHED RESISTORS. ^. <.. tW, mBrfto4, maiit (442J&0S) 

200 PRtCiSlON RE&tSTORS. -*.. -.. IW. IV, 2% imofberi |4 a 242»} 

SO DIPPED MTLACrS. »4vln> linnA, uil t^v» #42597) 

30 VOLUME CONTRi) LS, iiiiin. b4V. »sM v^hii* ^fiJOAgi 1 ) 

S T.SVDLTZEPfER DlOfKS, 1 viH|«451RT| 

S 9.1 VOLT ZCNER DraDES, i i*fltl «4SliNi| „. 



51.49 

iXtO 
433 
1^9 
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135 

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1.19 
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lv49 
130 
230 
3230 
2.00 
230 
230 
2.00 
230 
230 
230 
230 
230 
230 
230 
230 
230 
2.00 
230 
230 
230 
230 
230 
a3D 
230 
230 
.2.00 
2.00 
2,00 
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230 
230 
230 



1CS4LE 

2 for 11,50 
4fw- 1.01 



D 30-ft. Wtflf UnUP WIRE. » ■«*«, tar IC*. liiiiitaita (d«A]a03> 



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1 ALARM CLOCK CHIP, MHl5314» 4.dlBlt» (fiAlT59> 

5^^ PANCAKE PHOTOCELLS. 400 to 15K ohnii {4A2930) 

1 lOOKHZ MARKED CRTSTALB, cpprav for maikoF £cn. {ClA339e^ 

1 HOTHERRO AftD EI^CE C ON NEC T OR. 1 0& ptni , 1 fs " < 4 Al W7) 
t„ 4«-PtN EIKIE C0MNEGT3R, .154' ip^t^c |«Aiwi) 
1 J^ITSTICK. ftrt I OK PM44. »Or c««k»rt»n, TV f jmwi (flAS037} 
1^ CHARACTER CEAERATOR. 3 ' 7 Ho«l«h MM 20OZPtfiAU9S) 



130 
130 
130 
130 
2.95 
1.00 
13S 
330 
I3S 
235 
4.»5 



2 for 

2 for 

2 for 

21^ 

tOiih- 

2tar 

2l*r 

2l*r 

4 lor 

2 for 

20 for 

30 for 

20 lot 

300 fw 

200 lor 

60 f« 

SO ft. for 

100 for 

Star 

30 tar 

200 fw 

eotar 

20 tar 

60 for 

400 for 

400 taf 

200 tat 

•Ofv 

30*m 

200 tor 

20Qfv 

ItlOfv 

40 for 

SO for 

30 tor 

300 lor 

200 tor 

400lor 

4O0lDr 

120 lor 

SOtav 

10 for 

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2 for 

10 tor 

3tvf 

2t«r 

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130 

»3e 

13« 
131 
1.20 

13i 
i30 

l3l 
231 

5231 
2,01 
201 
2.01 
2.0 i 
2.01 
2.01 
231 
2.01 
2.01 
2.10 
331 
2.01 
2.01 
231 
231 
231 
2,01 
201 
201 
2.01 
231 
231 
2.01 
2.01 
2.01 
3,01 
2.01 
231 
231 
231 
131 
131 
131 
1.01 

2.de 

1.01 
1.96 

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t.K 
2.96 

4«9q 



7-SEGMENT READOUTS 



O 3^ OIOIT LCO WmSTWAlCH DISJ>I 4T. ^t(9A3tt40| 

□ 1 -QC#LUOflfSCIVrr "lHiXiO^ Mm, (Xe" e^MT, »«ln lute f»4A 
D 2 -^ SPERRV FLAT NIXIES, oronco, .J" riiul digit (NfiA50i4} 
P 5PERRV FLAT NIXIES. £»rih||;«. .3". I'^-dlK (^eASOlS^ 

□ MAfi 3 RUBBLE RfADOLTT. .19" rod. torn cjth. 4*f|l3334) 

C 2 - ItAt*^ IICAIKKJTS, hi*itli. t^4. tmiu 4m4o. -li^ 4^Ai$03} 
n fna lO BLOCH RtJUXIUT. .122" mm £«itio4c t^ A 20S2| 
P 4- DIGIT ItEAMHrr, 1*4. dm* utbod. rod! fiSASlOO) 
C FMO-S03. 3'' rvd, comi c*tlw4^ T-h^ 1 r« Jl2-949| 



3 for ft.lt 

1 for 130 
3 tot 1.19 

2 tar 1.19 
4fpr 1.00 
2fMr 1.00 
2 tar Ui 
t tar 13S 

130 



0#fE CEMT SALE 
4 taf Sl.20 
2 for 131 
4 for 120 
4 tar 120 
L2fbp 131 
4 f^ IJOI 
4 lot 1.20 
2 for 134 

39m 131 



^i»f:AKEies£ 



O S" TWIN eONE SPEAKER, h^ft, lor ur'n-horno (^44 50S9| 
UTt''^* 5" OVAL SPEAKER, • otatit (£642553) 
□ 2 >c 4" OVAL tnAJHER, i ohm* (^fiA34t4) 



54.50 
1.49 

2.49 



.till nO9»M00.\iCM 

Q eOKOEHSOR MlHES. MMHtn, SOO *limk, 14V|04a317S) 
D COMMUNlCATIOffS MlKt 5O0 otaM, C34IAM |ll«l4074) 
□ MtUSE CAJICELLIMG MJKE, Itam-CB. 500 otam 4l4jl3902> 

REUirSf 

D SPDT 12V BLOCK RELAY. SA cwrte^tv f«6A4032j 
P SPOT 12V HEED R-ELAY, tA c«nMeti (V4A4094) 
P SPOT 12V SENSITIVE, 2000 olirti £oll i «fiA3044AI 
Ul — 5PST 24V RCEl^ RCLA1', vwirrOpOn. lip vfirti, 12S0 



430 
fi35 



ttar 

M.Sl 
130 
130 

2 tar 

»43C 

431 



fWAflTSI 



9l3i 
139 
1.9S 



AMPLIFIERS! 



f 4> P l » 14** 4i 0* O ** 0* * «0 * »4»0 M lltt0 > 00 O * t04t »»W>M*M— —**—■■■• ■ O O =; 



O « WATTS ON A •OARD, tatCh bdt^ | p i » n p (d04S040( 
U 9 WATTS OH A CHIP^ T«fthfc« TA7205 <c«A50ST) 
3 WATTS OH A CMlP, 6-E PA 3» lcBAl522) 



^3S 



2tar 
11.9^ 

130 

i.9e 

130 

2 for 
55-M 



P L2V TRAPfSf^ORMEB, JOOtfio. pc leodv llOprL tn^ik3*l2t 
P 12V TRANSrORMEir, lA, 110.220prli, oi»en franie (t4A4040| 
D 24VCT TRANSFORMER. SOOmi, opitn Iromo, llOpH, {iie43323] 
D 23V Ml^AO CHARGER PAK. fdm-K 125fn«. 125 VAC ■■«(tieA4a991 



S1.49 

2.9S 
1.95 

135 



131 

2fi»r 

1131 

2.94 

136 

134 



im* SWMT0MMESf 



•I 2 SWITCHES ON A DIP {S4t4l«ai. 
P 3 SWITCHES ON A DIP j«)«A»49l 
P 4 SWlTCltf S DM 4 DIP (^ 44 ^?1 1 



2for 
t .79 



S -7T 



1^9 130 



IC S0CKETS! 



n 4-PIN MINI-DIP Ciil«A2L23j 4 fttt 51.19 ■ for 51.20 

P i4-Plf« DIP{FI&A130B) 3 for 1.19 fi tor 1.30 

P 14-PIN DIP <^°r> A 1309} 3 for 149 4 for 1.20 

D 14-PIN DIP (^G^337t) Sfor M9 12 fop 1.20 

O 24-PIN MSI D{P(=tiA»t4lt 2 tar 1.19 4 tav L.20 

Q 24-PIN M5I DIP rBfiAaiflTf 2 tar |.19 ^k»m 1-20 

O B^MTQ-S(li4Aflorj 4lw t*l» • fW L3D 

*m*^**** ** * ***** i t * ******* 

SPMCTBOL "SKIWNT-THIMS"; 

S/S" nquJirf. Itrewdrivpr nhafl. i» * ■ 

TA (al. L't wntL CeitiicI PC 2 fOr $1.H 
ItiKtki, Dntpf Ij^'- Ciil: Nh. An(3 valur f( 



44^4*#4t*493«444**9^«« 

:"*** RECTIFIERS' I 

* Ontar 4r C-t (ta, 442447 A ««4|«Co * 

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* fi*^ 13» 230 ; 
J SiOO J^g ^ _j^ T 

230 231 I 



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RiBBox r^iBiis: : 

Order by Cjt. SA3339 J 
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n*5rt ■■*• l< S*ta * 

His ^^ti-99 14-fLti.99 * 

° g 4^lt 1.90 4.tL 

□ 3J 3^ 131 6.tL 

D ^ 3.fL 138 frtL 



1.99 
139 



♦ 444 9i4#*«*4«.4*4«4 4.^^ 



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YOUR CHOICE 5 for S130 
IC SALE 10forSl31 

Dr^er by Cat. No. 
r i4A2IiS JUMBO REOLEOS 
C iffiaiJ? MICAOREOLEDf 
C 4A2790 JUMBO RE^ CLEAR LCDl 
C 44 2792 JUMBO TAPCREI) AMPUI 
U ^fiJt2I40 HICiRO CREOILEIM 



ZENERS! ordoti»tc«t. 

^0, ^ASllD 4 vottoiro # vfetUg«1 

1 Wott Solo 

a 73V Star SI, 

a A.2V Star 1. 

D t.lV Star 1. 

D ll.V Star 1. 



it SALE 
10 for 5131 
10 for 1.01 
10 tar 1.01 
10 tar 131 



S 

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3u3V 

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e.2v 

S.2V 
9.1V 

12. V 
1^. V 
It. V 



S4l> 

3«(H-9l. 



ICSALX 

«tarSl.01 



Jfor 
3 for 
3 for 
3 tar 
3 tar 
3 tar 



1. 
1. 
1, 
1. 
1. 
1. 



3 tar 1. 



D 12-V S tar L 10 tar LOl C a*> V 3 tar 1^ 
O 15-V 5 tar 1. 10 1* 1.01 P 30. V 3 tar 1. 



Ofor 
0*or 
for 
«lor 
Otar 
«1«r 
«1*r 
Btar 
4tar 



i.oi 

li.Ol 
1.01 
1.01 
131 
131 
I3i 
131 
131 



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IN ELECTRONICS 




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R«tail: 1*5- 1H l^A rtirmin<< RL. Wak^-flflld, 

MINIMUM ORDER — S6.00 

POLY PAKS 

f^S^S^T^TTf P.O. BOXS42-A6 
&£ PHONED, LYNNFJELD, MA. 



C, COPYRIGHT 197B - POLY PAKS tNC. 



197 



ADVA 




KIT $11^ 

ASSEMBLED S17.95 
ADD S1,25 FOR 
POSTAGE/HANDLING 



VARIABLE POWER SUPPLY 

• Continuously Variable from 2V to over 15V 

• Short'Circuit Proof 

• Typical Regulation of 0.1% 

• Electronic Current Limiting at 300mA 

• Very Low Output Ripple 

• Fiberglass PC Board Mounts All Components 

• Assemble in about One Hour 

• Makes a Great Bench or Lab Power Supply 

• Includes All Components except Case and Meters 



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n C4t3& Chiv9 741 U»^Mii4« Q» An^ nlHf 

1147111 FM IF &ArtvUMii I1F Anv. OK. Umiwl CHP 
1 M&7183 Hdi CMfW Vhtidm 0,4V <^ I^A O.ltn DO^ 
££NEa&-&pKlfr Vblt.^ :t.3, ^.9. 4-3. 5. V B.8, B.2 
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WITH MAMY ITEMS. 



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TO US AHQ OWAQA PREPAtO 1 



Solder less breadboard section has 
34 breadboard strips uf 5 loclt^ts 
each. 2 bjs strips of 40 sockets 

each. Component bracket for switcfws 
lamps etc*, accftpt* leads .01" to 
.035" dtarater. S11.9S «a 



IC socirr^ 

Low PnofMe Solder 

14 pifi M za 

16 ptn ,21 40 
U pin =?8 



Hire Urtp 
S pin 

14 pin 
16 pin 



COHPLETi SAT 15FACT 10*1 SU 

tMXSS INDICATBD OTHEPIflSf . OT^ft COUKTHIES ADO 105 - flCESS ISFUHDED. 

QRoees SHIPPED IN 3 yasoLim days Fteit receipt, mnmm pott ito.oo 

CALlfOWlIA HESiflEHTS AllO SALES TAJl, niHinM COD 0« CMMR OfflER 111.00 

INTERNATIONAL ELECTRONICS UNLIMITED 

VILLAC^E SQUARE, P.O. BOX 449, CARMEl VALLEV, CA 9i»34 USA 

TELEPHONt 40t«$^3m |4 



199 



H^^ 



Frequency 
Counter 



$ 89.95 



kit 




UTILIZES NEW MOS-LSI CIRCUITRY 



You We requested it, and now ft's here! The CT-50 frequency 
counter kit has mOTe features than counters selling for twice The 
prica. Measuring fraquency i& now as easy 35 pus^hing a button, the 
CT-50 uviN automatically plaea the doctmal point in alt htode$, giving 
you quick, rfiliabte readings. Want to use the CT-50 mobila? No 
problem, it runs equelly as well on T2 V dc as it does on TTO V ac. 
Want super accuracy? The CT 50 use$ the popular TV color burst 
freq* of 3.579545 iVlHjj for time base. Tap off a color TV with our 
adapter and get ultra accuracy - »001 ppm! The GT-50 offers 
professional quality at the unheard of price of $89,95. Order yours 
todayl 

CT-50, 60 MH7 counter kit , - ,^ , - $ 89.95 

CT-SO WT, 60 MHz counter, wired and tested . . . , 159.95 

CT 600. 600 MHz prescaier option for CT-SO, add ...,,,.. 29.95 



SPECIFICATIONS 

Sensitivity; less than 25 mv. 

Frequency range: 5 Hz to 60 MHz, typically 65 MHz 

Gatetime: 1 secorKi, 1/10 second, with eutomatic decimal 

point positioning on both direct and prescate 

Oisptey: 8 digit red LEO A'* height 

Accuracy: 10 ppm, ,001 ppm with TV tirtiebasef 

Fnput; BNC, 1 megohm d^ri&ct, 50 Ohm with prescale option 

Power: 110 V ac 5 Watts or 12 V dc @ 1 Amp 

Size: ApproK. S** « 4" x 2'', high ctuality aluminum case 



Cdlor burst adapter for .001 ppm accuracy 



$14.95 




CLOCK KIT 

6 disit 12/24 hour 



Wont a clock that 
looks good enough for your 
living room? Forget the com- 
petitor's kludges and try one of 
oursf Features: jumbo ,4"" digttt. 
Polaroid tens filter^ extruded aluminum 
case available in 5 colors, quality PC boards 
and super instructions. All parts are included, no 
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assembly time. Colors: ^Mver^gold, blacky bronze, 
blue (specify). 

Alarm t;lo€k, DC S, 12hf only , , 

Mobrle clocks DC'7 .,,,,,,.,.,,,,,, 
Clock kit with 10 min ID timer, DC-IO 



$2Zd5 
. 24.95 

. 25.9 B 
. 25,95 



A^«mbl9d 
$10.00 



and tested clocks avail gib le, edd 



VIDEO TERMINAL 
KIT SI 49.95 



4 iBIimflMLl li ■ lli^f^eh PC tail] fi%mf ■■IUIFC9 cpnJv mm A&C4I 
^ vvIiOmhI And ■ TV ibI in bni^iO^liB n camp^^ilB intBiBctivii iririlTiFiBl 
ftiT uti\\t\mct»j** \u ifour mdcf 1;^ p^usHcir Bfyiii.l'ii una-UE Inlarf^ra. la. 
■irnny PantL>p«t m-* luiBin fivali- nintipny, ■tt^'^til gurHmWittt »^nt Jtrus 
b*Ljt| r^tm {UD u» MC^ ' ' tq/t* 9* 32 £*»■»«!: ifiKa by Tfl tmtm, 

4ilAJ 10 and Irom njtr 'v wKf ltrvtH»ira ejii-RftiH] cufwiw 

ftvrtsm, K*tm«nllH«^tuhlEi #«Plwrt tmt^ ipM. tvnw'-d fs«*%. *•*** 

*m/^ «*v. i«m- *•••«, h a r i ' * i , rf iu nw a t^ttar A^m 4i^n b^^. cltKari 

cv* tBQM'Bi' A iriKrt »i «pt»<B» WS mm tern m*am«ft ■ •nd n nt f% 
ohm tJB*nf!tnt^M t^iIm 



1 H3S%^ pelt 

TH3Jtn, AMittnLiipff urn I f«iMd 
Vrt I VMJao tti Hf Woiauiaror Kl 






CHEAP CLOCK KIT S8.95 

DC>4 FesturH. Do«i not 

• £ i^Sit .4 ' LED inciiHte bOArtt 

• 1 2 or 34 f Of rnav or iran&f w me* 



PC Boani 
S2B& 

TrafltfOf JTVt: : 

SK4g 




500 r^Hi 
PRESCALER 



Extend tha rsrvga of yoyr 
coujmsr m GDO MH7. WorM wltfi 
nil countvrt. Leu ttmrt ISO mw 
HTHitivitv Specif V 715 ot ~^100 
Wired, tBit#d, PSia S&^ 95 

Kn, PS te 



$44 11 & 



CAR 

CLOCK 
KIT $27.95 







AUm DIIVWEfl 



■il.OC 11 



BI^jH 



^•pPC ncpfCMih 



30 watt 



2 meter 
Power Amp 

The immcnt% RE class C power 
■ mp noiAT avi3iilab]« mail order I Four 
SVains in for 30 Walts out, 2 in Tor 15 
Out. 1 ir* fcK B Oul, tf*Cfedl|jlfl vatu^, 
CO^TppletB tAfifh alt pirti, irt^trij-ctiorK 
■rid detait^ on T R ralev- d«« not 
iR'tluded. 
Corrrplets Kir. PA -1 ... . S^2.95 



CALENDAR ALARM CLOCK 

Hfli iji^urV tiJ4U ur ij- cjfie (.QUld euof atk for. 
Kit Inr.lijUfli au«rvcli'|nig ftHCcipt cAta, 
Ijioid It icitQ ¥Mill, ttar^on m tfvtn cut' 
FEATURES: 

• «; rjiiin, *- Mii»i LEO • I J/1W hd<» r vfnAE 



Comi^riete Kit, loss 

rsr-9 



534,95 



5314 Clock 

74S00 

7^43112 

7447 

7473 

7475 

7490 A 

74143 



LINEAR 

$2.9& &B& $ .50 

.3& 556 ,76 

.7§ B66 U49 

,79 S67 1.49 

.3& I4&e .BD 

.go LED DRfVefi 

.SS 754*11 ,50 

3.S0 75492 .50 



REGULATOR 
7eMG $1.4I> 



309k 
3a9H 
340K 12 
7805 



7812 ^ 
78T5 *5 
7813 



.69 

89 
,B9 



TRANSISTORS 

MRF 23a3t)W VHP $11,95 

NPtM 2N3904 lype IO/SI.OO 

PNP 2M3906 Type 10^51,00 

NPN pQwAf T«b4aW l'S1 00 

PNP POWST T»b 40W 3/S1 .00 

FET MPF 102 fvpa 3/S2-00 

UJT 2N264G tvpe 3/S2 DO 

2N30B& NPN Power .75 



DIODES: tKV.25A 



5/$1.00 



1CWV.1A lO/ZSI CKl 



ma MA lvtl« &0/S2.0il 



LED DISPLAYS 




FISO 359 
FSID510 
Dt 707 . 
HP 7 730 



75 
K25 



741 OP-AMP SPECIAL 

Factorv prime tntm dip «nth both 
X«toM *nA 741 part nufnl3^«tfi 

10 for S2.00 



wm. 



Bed Polaroid F liter . . . 4,25" X 1 .1 2S" 



P.O. Box 4072 Rochester NY 14610 
(716)271.6487 



SOCKETS 

14 PIN 5/S1.00 

tePIN 5^Sl,00 

24PJN 2/51,00 

40 Pm 3/£2,O0 



FERRITE BEADS 

wnh into ^Tt^ ipKt 

lS/Sl.00 

G tiGit: Batun Beqds 

b;si.oo 



TELEPHONE ORDERS 
WELCOME 



SititfacEion, 
9u«riiit«tfl Of 

COO. 9m lli». 
Ordm i,i^4tr SIO 
•^ STS NY m 
dents ickl 7% tax. 
, Alkt B% tnr ipQiljge, 

hindllrva Minimum 



RS 



MINI -KITS 



T044E DECODER KlT 

j4 eenifilflit tunrn decddtp on a ^onQtv PC Scant 
F«tiv«» 4Q0'£00t] He odj^jstdiJr frmMncv 
TJHig*^ «o-tlfge tv^silion, '167 ]C ywliil fo* 

luudh-lDrn docoding, ton* burrit Ej^inct IfiFi , FSK 
«iemcMi, jinmillngi, anri munv ofhei umi, Uise ? 
for 12 t^^jiton iQuchtQna dicadin^. Runi Qn b 

Conmlvl* Km^IV-l ..... . SA^ 




SUPER SLEUTH AMPLIFIER 

A super- S0n£j live amplifier which will pick up a 
pin drop at 1S feetl Great for monitoring 
baby's room or as a ger>eral purpose lest 
amplifier. Full 2 watts of output, ryr>s on 6 to 
12 volts, uses any cype of mike. Requires 8^5 
ohm weaker. 
CcMTiptete KK BN-9 ..**,*...*»**_.. $4^5 



FM WIRELESS MIKE KIT 

Trar^&mli up to 300' to any FM broadcast radio, 
uses any type of mike. Runs on 3 ro 9 V. Type 
FM'2 has added super sensitive mike preamp. 
FM-1 ,...., S2.96 FM-2 .,,... $4 J95 



COLOR ORGAN/MUSIC LIGHTS 

See music come alive! 3 different ligtits flicker 
with mu^ic or voice. One ligiit for lews, one fur 
the mid-fange and one for the highs. Each 
chafing I individually adjustable, and drives up 
to 30O watts. Great for partios^ band mu^ic, 
nife clubs and more. 
Compt«i9Klt^ML*1 , „$7,9S 



LEDBUNKYKIT 

A grear attenKon getter which alternatftly 
flashes 2 Jumbo LEDs, Use for name badges, 
buttons. Of warning type panel lights^ Buns on 
3 to 9 vd ts« 
CcMnpleitKit *,*. 



POWER SUPPLY KIT 

CdfnplEt^ I'iplii rBquliiind |3uwer iLr^ply P*^^ 
vid*E VErlabJtt '^'''lii' vdltf at ^OQ rr^A and i b vnlt^ 
«i 1 Amp. liO tn V load f Hgu Idt lOrn* gocnJ 1 1 { Eerkiq 
»ni Brmfi iiJiw Kit Itn TrttMfewnt4tf R«i)iiireA 
6k8 V at 1 Arrtp and; IS ID 3a VCF 

Hit, PSn3tT » JS 




SIREN KIT 

Produces upward and downward wail char- 
acteristic of police siren. 5 lAi^tts audio output, 
runs on 3-9 volts, ums BAb ohm speaker. 
Complete K it, SM-3 S2.95 

DECADE COUNTER PARTS 

*ndudes 7490A, 7475, 7447, LEO readout, 
current limit resi&tors, and instructions on an 
easy to byild lov^ co^ frequency counter. 
Kit of parts, DCU-1 $330 



200 




FAMOUS HAMTRONICSPREAMPS 
let you hear the week ones! 



Great For OSCAR, SSB, FM, ATV. Over 10,000 in 
uie I'h rough out the world on oil hype^ of fecetvars;. 



P9 Kit ST2.95 

PI4 IVj>ed 524.95 

Deluxe vliF model for opp" 
I i cation I where space permits. 



• 1-1/5 X 3" •Cover* ony 4 WHt bond •T2 Vdc 
•Ideal lor OSCAR •Diode protection •lOdBpain 

MODEL RANGE 



I 




P9-LO 
P9-HI 
P9-220 
P14 Wired 



26-38 MHz 
88-172 MHz 
172-230 MHz 
Give exoct bond 



■^tLUmf^ 



TO KH Sm.95 

PI6 Wired S2h95 



Miniature VHF modef for 
•CQven any 4 MHz band ^^^^ ^^^^ _ ^j^^ ^1^ 

• 20 dB gain •T2 Vdc !/2 ^ 2'Z/B [oches. 
MODEL RANGE 



l^-LO 20-83 MHz 

P8-HI 83-190 MHz 

P8-220 220-230 MHz 

PT6 WTfed Give exoct band 



PIS Kit S18.95 
P35 Wired 134.95 

• Covers any 6 MHz band in 
UHF range of 380-520 MHz 
•20 dB gain • Low noise 




FM.CW TRANSMITTER KITS 



&UILD UP YOUR OWN GEAR FOR OSCAR CW 
OPEIUTION, FM REPEATERS, CONTROL LINKS 
• Professional SoLFrtding Audio •Free of SpHjrt 
•Cofnpletely Stoble •Built*ir» TesKng Aids 




T40 1 1 Chonnel 200 MW Exciter Kit for 2M or 
6M bond ^ ** * »if«*«Bti»**«it*«-i>«.*.> 539, 95 

120 Triplef/tJrlver Kit. Uie with T40 fof operation 
on 432-450 M Hi bortd.. „-.,*.. S19,95 




, f fffff fyrrrrrrrrf 

T»0 RF POWER AMPLIFIER MODULES FOR ABOVE 
• No tuning •VSWR Protected •Wired and Tested 
•Rafed for Conlini>ous Duty - Gfeol for Repeot^rs 

T80-f50; 140-175 MHz, 20-25W output $79,95 
180-450; 430-470 MHz, 13-1 SW output $79.95 



AT LAST! 



METER SSB 



TRANSVERTER 

At a price you can afford 



Use inexpensive recycled 10 or II meter tsb exciter on 2 meters. 




FEATURES: 

• Lineor Converter for SSB, CW, FM, etc, 

• A fraction of the price of other unlfs 

• 2W p^e*p, output with 5 MW of drive 

• Us« low power top oa exciter or ottefiuolor pod 
'Easy to ali^ wTlh buiit-in te^t points 

VXa-( i TRANSVERTER KIT S59.9S 

A^5 Optional Cabinet for XverterA PA S20 



Frequency Schemes Available: 



VX2-4 28-30 
VX2-5 23-29 
VX2-6 26-28 



144-146 
1 45- 14A 
144-146 



D 

a 
□ 



Other frequency 
ronge$ ovoHoble 
on special order 



3M LINEAR POWER AMPLIFIERS; 

LPA 2-15 Kit 15Wp,e,p. $69.95 
LPA 2-70 Kit 70 W p.e.p, $139,95 



New VHF&UHF Converter Kits 



let you receive OSCAR signals and other exciting 
SSB, CW,& FM activity on your present HF receiver. 



aither one 

-ONLY $34.95 

incli/ding crystal 





MODEL RF RANGE (MHZ) l-F RANGE 



cso 


SO-52 


28-30 


C144 


144-146 


28-30 


C145 


145-147 (OSCAR) 


28-30 


C146 


146-148 


28-30 


Clio 


Aircraft 


2S-30 


C220 


220baftd 


28-30 



MODEL 

C432-2 

C432-5 
C432-7 
C432-9 
Special 



RF RANGE (MHZ) l-F RANGE 

4^-434 28-30 

435-437 (OSCAR) 28-30 
427.25 6L25 

439,25 61.25 

Other iHF & rf r^ange^ avoHoble 



SpecjoE Other *-f & rf rt3n0«s ovqi loble 



VHF/UHF FM RCVR KITS 



* NEW GENERATION RECEIVERS 

* MORE SENSITIVE *MORE SELfCTlVE (70 or 100 d&) 

* COMMERCIAL GRADE DESIGN 

* EASY TO ALIGN WITH BUILT-IN TEST CKTS 

* LOWER OVERALL COST THAN EVER BEFORE 



A9 Extruded A turn Cose/Conn&ctor s $ 1 2 . 95 




R70 6-chonnel VHF Receiver Kit for 2M^ 6M, tOM, 
220 MHz, or com* I bands ,,,.,•.,,,,. S69, 95 
Optionqf xtgf filter for 100 dB adj chon 10.00 




m FREE 1978 CATALOG* 

40 PAGE CATALOG IS YOURS FO« THE ASKING! 



irS EASY TO ORDER! 

©CALL OR WRITE MOW FOR flEt 
CATALOG OR TO PLACE ORDERI 

©PHONE 716-663-9254, (Answering 
service eveningiond weekends for your cort* 
venience. Personol service 9-5 eostem time.) 

©Use credit cord, c,o.d,|. cheeky ni^o* 

©Add $2.00 shipping & hgndting^ 



JN CANADA, send to Cofist-ec; 5605 Westiyke Ave; 
Montreal, Que H4W 2N3 or phone 514-482 -2640, 
Add 28% to cover duly, tox^ ond exchange rate. 



R90 UHF Receiver Kit for ony 2 MHz segment of 
380-520 MHz band, *,,,,,,*»,»*, ,** $89,95 



m ironies, mc 



182-D Bermonf lid; Rochester, NY 14612 



/ 



m 




mSMMM^SM 



ftiLLET iLECTB^IICS 





PHONE ORDERS ON MASTERCHARGE OR VISA CARDS 

PS-14 HIGH CURRENT REGULATED 

POWER SUPPLY KIT 



P.O. BOX 19442 E 
DALLAS, TX. 75219 

(214)823-3240 qb 



• Better than 200MV load and line regiilatiofi 
' Foldback Current Limitfrig 

• Shon Circyit Proi^tad 

• Ttiermal Sliuidown 

• Adjustable Current Limiting 

• Lessthaa 1% ripple. 

■ 15 amps n,& to 14.5V 

• All parts supplied including heavy duty trans- 
former 

• Quality plated fiberglass PC board. 



Le^ Case, 
meters & jackt 

39.95 



UPS SHIPPING 
PAIOI 



MK-03A CLOCK/TIMER KIT 

Features 24 hour Zulu time and up to 2^ hours of elapsed 
time on the same set of six digit LED readouts. Totally 
mdependent operation of both functions. Clock has pr^ 
settabie alarm with 10 minute snooze. Timer has reset, 
hold, and count functiont. Full noise and overvolta^ 
protection. 24 hoyr only. Readouts has dimmer feature 
or they can be turned off without disturbmg the clock or 
timer, Timebase included (.01% accuracy}. Because of the 
many options and mounting consfderaiions the case and 
switches are not included. Switches are standard types, 
Will fit inside standard aircraft fnstrumenl case. 



I 



9-14VDC 

28.95 



!50MA W/readouts on 
40MA WAeadouts off 



OVER VOLTAGE PROTECTION KIT 6.95? 




POWER SUPPLY 
METERS 

OuatfVf 3H" maififs tor the PS14. 0-15VDC & 
0-25 A. Matched set, IndJviduaNv packagtfd. 
NDTSURPLUSI 12,95/iflt 





eqkJipment. Should be used on units thai are fused. Di 
rectty compalible with the PS- 12 and PS-14. All electron 
ics supplied Drilled and plated PC board. (Order OVP 1) 

f^' S^ ^ ULTRASONIC SENDER RECEIVER KIT US-02 

TOTAL ^CUfllTYl Compt^wly iiwh^i* yitn*: KHZl Sound bwrn ««o«hi ilkt « pnmDci*cvJc b*wn but it unvftecxal 

ty hflfit, Jie*t Of rtflt* SwBifti^ Jrmftvwuvm ma n.r^t:svmr g*n tw vvai trocn 6 tiucfw* lo 2& lMt» A foii'd ctiitct bwMklng fjw 
L- . ncauHts an otjtpui io 90 itm ttwt «rili iNi^ up to T50 HA to Dfii« 4 Btt»v. TRIAC. «£ Con*i*«t» *l»ctnifl i« »*» provi«tod 
vvq««i on 13VDC Cufirttpilrtid) ^nd dt«twi Mh Uwn 1Q0 MA tJid it fv bw#» ■Ivmt, dbfaa tmmt^n, aiUMwa 

iimonmltc doot b«tlf . vlsclrontc rit ttv^i *} pnd more, 

OtiTJooaa m try dil4v and At*rm Tlriwout CiTtnjft 
viitn icMirca w (ink iip is 200 MA DC. 



1 WrBLE ALArM Kit 

A fum £ASV kn to iBnenibk! itin cwt^b an ett 
pi«fcirm 10 wilt ciktal t{»n^ icrcjim. Ri$«nbi« 

Eijrr>peBri utt^n Doiiftd Groal Iqt alaiTtis orloyL 
Oi]?!ra!i2D 1ifjm 5--12VDC Ml u^i lo ^ ampltninu 
TzVC?C*e ohm fipesker). Over five ihpusflnd 
haw bmn Mld. Afl p.-ins including PC bnprd, 
iflss ipesksp. « ^-H OFfOERWQ-02 

2.50 



i 

I 

J 



t 



MOBtLE CLOCK CALENDAR KIT 



COMPLETE KIT LESS CASES 



21.50 



3J9S 



haw OM fmi« iGinMr cAt OlfirTAL CCOCX / 
irtmtt *cAT:^t«i ar^d i4« iMPfiiiv All mm pjnttiuta htwH 



I 

i 




a 



fl 



/i// Parfs iAre Pr/me & Guaranteed! 




PICK A PAIR! 



8 A Complimentary Darlington Power Trattjisiors. 
MJ900 PNP, Mil 000 NPN. 90 Watts. BuOd high 
power audio amps. 

Buy a Pair for $3,001 



MC1469R 

SODma postive regu- 
lator, 3 to 30 vafts. 
wiifi comptetB spec$ 
and applications. 
$t42S - house 



t.flllwACC) 
•Lt^9*ifl DIGIT L60 

dii0k*¥ with AM/PM 

inUlciiton 
«l-i{iitiinfl colmnBt 1H2 

Ml* 
*S|3«6lal ncjft! end 

Qi/iprvcilTi^e prat«i;lhQn< 

fit* rnQtillc u** 
• A u « I li grv output ifrlll 

to cOiitnM ex tvnal 

■Oi iii^mfiinit 



■iulTtln- ^tirtition 
biBukJna turnt 

oft i-dadaulii whiin 
HDt |m um 
APr-eiALtAblB- Ri«rrTt witi| 

Z3.50 h{Q CASE 



12 VAC XFMA fe* ItQ VAC 



no. 





Heatshrink 
ing 



good asst 

fr 1/8", 



A very 
of 3/32^ 

3/16" 1/4" & 7/16" 

6" lengths 12 pes. 

7Sc 

Thli lutm PREE 
i}f 1E.I>Q or more 



CA3011 



TOOKhz to owe? 2QMh/. Good 
for IP's 3fid low frequency 
Complete Specs I 



50^ each 

MC1351P 



MC1351P FM IF 
AMP. 14 pin tC. 
Complete FM sound 
subsytem, similar to 
LM2111 house no. 



MulticoJored 
26 Conductor 
Ribbon Cable 

Ho. 28 wire vvith 

a wow^n binder. Su* 

per Flexible! 

10' roll - $2.95 



220mfd 

@25V 

Axtal Cap 

7/$ 1.00 

500m fd 

t&3bV 

Ajcial Cap 

5/Sl.OO 

^ p -a H ■ « * • • <a « d ■ * «■ ^ ■ « 

1 tOOmfd # 35 
Axiai Capacitor 

4/S1.00 

Spra^e 



/$1.00 



General 
Purpose NPN 

M3569 Faircjiild Vwo ° 60V 
Hfv to 300. SOOMW ptTMtf, 
tpascf TO-S. Limited Qtft 

6 for $1.00 



Spec/a// 

Limited Qty I 
LM567 Tone 
Decoders 
while they lastt 
d9c 

#30 Silver 
Plated 



Wirewrap wire with Ky- 
nar* jacket 4 colors 
available, 100 fn of each 
col Of, 

$4*95 ^^00' 



MICRO TRIMMER 

CAPS 

Tiny 4-40 pfd 

trimmer used orSg- 

inally in watches! 

3/$l,00 



MG 01 ELECTRONIC GRANDFATHER CLOCK 

MfiJk Mt «r« talking abQul docki chc^ck oui in« mw GRAND- 
FATHER CLOCK H»irFDMwd ]n Apili ig^g RAQJjg 

ELECTRON iCS Wt haw Tiw fintr l«iT In ihn warid wrlh eli ttw* 
balow II tied features. Tiha bloqeiii probiBm h to deacrLbti iibw 
ynlquii ^nd faicrrralingi fliii iJrue^jece riiiily iii^ T^o L£D 
"Swlnttfnq " Pendulum ami Matching TidcTDck Saumi »tv 
avfltUblO Ofilv on our trock in adctilion rhe ni&L-Tiflilic "trtJi^'" 
notffi iMKh Nxir (ic 3 iFmK fdr 3 4'ddch^K Haiised in th« 
opti^Af SoiiiCf HanlwQ#(tC4il«, tl>l«yiiilfn>ittt« bavtiiiful wkfUlon 



i 



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•It' 4 OlGilT LED READOUT 

fan ^limf 
*Siimilifiedi nwtrigtng 
L£OP«AdiiJ»fn 



•An CAIDS Coeiar^MStien 

• snd Xf MP ineliHled 

33.9S KIT &9.S^ ASEMB 



fi 




ppilOfWl Scrtdd f««rdwD&i1 Cwe for M{T Ot CItKk atrer 10 
SOLID MAROtfUOOD 1 J QH SOL 1 1^ WA LNUT IBPt^ 



MiFtiAlyr? ?K. Pot 
w/i«vitrh PC 

f!ldfeei> i>i«itle: 
FREE 



LhMlteO QTV 

C<!iTipuriiir G^ads 

f lUTEn CAP 

2"' * S5i" 

»S00 rrffd«^T5V 

a SSgr 




SPECiAL 

SALE 

Tit 31^ LED 

ComiTi^fv Afiodl 

Size 
Sun^avil P'm^aul 

CS 



ZENER GRAB BAG. A wflfv nice A$sortmerii of lOdlffttr^nt 
VDiUgflt be^wflon 2.7v inrf M VDC in 400 fiflW. ViWand tW, 
Ali arrj prima units bul most hgvtn Mfq's. nijmtourt, Wa luppiy 
ii erosfl toftfrtniico Bheet lo iiandird nymb^ri.^ 



SPECIAL pftrce 



10 pi!ecei 



1.00 



FANTASTIC SOUMO SVMTHESIZER 

76477 

Srttid fiew from Tl , hlftke any stxirKi^ under tf* 
sun wilh thri 28 pirt gem! Stnfte JC contains* 
Noiie 9er»er«tor, iupcf low fr«qu«ficv OSC, 
VCO^ (me sh&t. mij<er envelope control ami 
amp. Works from a tingle 5 to 9V0C source. 
Wi th a page mfln M iL $3. 95 each 



B^E SMALL PRINT 

* MC/VI5A A -PUndtiitf 

* TX rCii^ane** Oiotfl, ow »50 

* OfHaAfS undeF juthi IQ^ lor 





202 




This new instrument has taken a giant step in 
front of the multitude of counters now available. 
The Opto-8000.1 boasts a combination of fea- 
tures and specifications not found in units cost- 
ing several times its price. Accuracy of ±0.1 
PPM or better — Guaranteed — with a 
factory -adjusted, sealed TCXO (Temperature 
Compensated Xtal Oscillator). Even kits re- 
quire no adjustment for guaranteed accu- 
racy! Built-in, selectable-step attenuator, rug- 
ged and attractive, black anodized aluminum 
case (.090" thick aluminum) with tilt bail. 50 
Ohm and 1 Megohm inputs, both with amplifier 
circuits for super sensitivity and both 
diode/overload protected. Front panel in- 
cludes "Lead Zero Blanking Control" and a 
gate period Indicator LED. AC and DC 
power cords with plugs included. 




OPTOELECTRONICS, INC 

5821 NE 14 Avenue 

Ft. Lauderdale. FL 33334 

Phones: (305) 771-2050 771-2051 

Phone orders accepted 6 days, until 7 p.m. ^^ 



mmm dtaige 



SPECIFICATIONS; 

Time Base— TCXO ±ai PPM GUARANTEED! 

Frequency Range — 10 Hz to 600 MHz 

Rasolution— 1 Hz to 60 MHz; 10 Hz to 600 MHz 

Decimal Point — Automatic 

All IC s socketed (kits and factoi7-wired) 

Display^ dig/t LED 

Gate Times — 1 second and 1/10 second 

Selectable Input Attenuation— XI, XlOr X100 

Input Connectors Type — BNC 

Approximate Size~3"h x TW'w x 6Va"d 

Approximate Weight — 2V? pounds 

Cabinet — black anodized atuminum (.090 "thickness) 

Input Power— 9^15 VDC. 115 VAC 50/60 Hz 

Of internal batteries 
OPTO-eOOO.1 Factory Wired 
OPTO-8000.1K Kit 



$299.d5 
S249,35 






ACCESSORfES: 

Battery- Pack Option — Internal Ni-Cad Batteries and charging unit 

$19.95 

Probes: P-IOO — DC Probe, may also be used with scope $13.95 

P-tOI — LO-Pass Probe, very useful at audio frequencies 

$16,95 
P-102 — High impedence Probe, ideaf general purpose 
usage $16,95 

VHF RF Pfck-Up Antenna-Rubber Duck w/BNC #Duck-4H $12,50 

Right Angle BNC adapter #RA-BNC $ 2.95 

FC-50 — Opto-8000 Conversion Kits: 

Owners of FC*50 o^unters with #RSL-650 Prescaler can use 
this kit to convert their unrts to the Opta-3000 style case, indud* 
ing most of the features. 

FC-50 — Opto-SOOO Kit $5995 

•FC-SO — Opto-8000F Factory Update $99.95 

FC-50 — OptO-eOOO.l (w/TCXO) Kit $t09.95 

•FC-50 — Opto-8D00.1F Factory U^Kf ate $149.95 

•Units returned for factory update must be completely as- 
sembled and operational 



TERMS; Orders 10 US. ancJ Canada, add 5% to maximum of $10.00 per order 
(or shipping^ handttrg and ffisurance. To aJI otn&r coyntries, add 10% of totai or- 
der n^idli residents add 4% state tax. C.O.D. fee: $1.00. Personal checks myst 
dear before rnerchandise iS shipped. 



A^ a ***** * 



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7Le*D! 



16K E-PROM CARD 



i 



Krr FEATURES: 



IMAGINE HAVING 16K OF SOFTWARE ON LINE AT 

S-100 [Imsai/Aitairl Buss Compatiilel 



1. Oouble fided PC board vuith solder 
mttli and silk screen and gold plated 
contaci fingen* 

2. Selectable wiil sutei. 

3. All address lines & data lines but- 
ffir&dl 

4. All sockets included. 

5. Gn card regulaton. 

KIT INCIUDES ALL PAHTS AND 
SOCKETS (except 27Q8'sK Add S2S. hi 
asembled and tested. 




TIME! 



PRICE CUT! 



$57.50 kit 



SKCIALOFFIR: 



WAS %ms^ 



Our 27(]B's (450^5) ire $12J5 
when purchased Mith »bove Irtt. 



•^vik 



Stoiti* 



I 



KfTFEAIUES: 



ADD 

$20 FOR 

250 NS 



1, Ootthled sided PC Board wilft tolder 
iMili and itik ten en layout Gc^td 

STited Eontict finpn. 
JL mckets iocludtd. 

3. Fullv buffered on all address and 
data lines. 

4. Phantam it jumper selectable ta 
pin B7, 

5. FOUR 7B05 repjlatorr tre provided 

"•**"''• {450 NSJ 



BK LOW POWER RAM KIT-S143.G0 



S-100 (Imsai/Aitair] Buss Compatible! 2 kits for $279 

Fully A»«mbled & Bum«l In 

$179.00 

Blank PC Board w/ DocumMitstion 

$29.95 

Low Profile Socket Set 13.50 

Support IC's fTTL& Regulators) 

$9.7S 

Bypass CAP'S (Disc & Tsntafums) 

$4.50 




USES 21 L02 RAM'S) 



MOTOnOUl QUAD OP - AMP 

MC 3401 P(N FOR PiH SUB. 

FOR POPULAfl LM 3800. 



3 FOR $1 



ALARM CLOCK CHIP 

N.S. MM5375AA. Sw Digits 
With tull Data New! 

$1.95 each 



MOTOROLA 7805 R VOLTAGE REGULATOR 

Same as standard 7805 except 750 MA output, 
TO-220, 5VDG output. 

44c each or 10 for $3,95 



FULL WAVE BRIDGE 

4 AMP. 200 PIV. 
69f 10 FOR $5.75 



NOT ASSOCIATED WITH OIGITAL 
RESEARCH OF CALIFORNIA, THE 
SUP1*U£RS OF CPU SOFTWARE. 



450 NSI 2708 EPROMS 

Now full speed! Prime new units from a major U.S. Mfg. 450 N,S. 
Access time. 1 K x 8, Equiv, to 4*1 702 A's in one package. 



$15.75 ea. 



4 FOR $50^ 



COMPUTER MFG MAKES 

S 500.000.00 

GOOF! 



woioBO^'' 4K RAM CHIPS — 99« each 



22 PIN DIP 



A major U.S. computer mfg Installed Ihousands of these 4K Motorola RAM's on the wrong boards and had to remove them. All parts were then tested, and met 
FULL 5PEC9I If yOL> don't rrvind a Utile solder orv the leads, then this J3 the t>est memory buy \n the world. Arranged as 4096 k 1 Bits. 470 NS. 
The Motorola 6605 is oneof the easiest dynamic RAM's to use since it DOES NOT require muUiplexed addresses as do most other 4K's such a^ the 4096 or 4027 
A complete memory board descgn utmg the 6G05 ts outim^d ir^ the Motorola tMQQG Applications Manual starting on page 4-70. 

990 EACH 
'WITH DATA SHEET) 

FOR $6.95 YOU GET AS MUCH STORAGE AS IN 32 - 2102'sl 



LOOK! 



MCIVI6605 



FULLY GUARANTEED! 



SURPLUS BUY OF THE DECADE!!! 



8F0R$5.95 

409&BVTESOFRAftfl: 



4K STATIC RAM'S 
2114, The new iodustry 
standard. Arranged as 1K 
k4. Equivalent to 4-21 
L02'5 in 1 package! 18 
pin DIP. 2 chips give 1Kx8. 

2/$24. 8/$85. 



OPCOA LED READOUT 

$LA*1, Cornmon Anode, 
,33 inch character size. 
The original high efficiencv 
LED display. 75c ea, 

4 FOR $2.50 



2102 RAM BLOWOUT! 

Fully static. Standard Power. The 
mostpopular RAM for microprocessors. 
We made a huge surplus buy. but there 
will be NO MORE WHEN THESE ARE 
GONE! 

Part #21 F02-4 450 N.S. FASTt 

8 FOR *6^5 32 FOR $25 



Z-80 PROGRAMMING MANUAL 
By Mostek, The major Z-80 second source. The most 
detailed explanation ever on the working of ttie Z-80 CPU 
CHIPS. At least one full page on each of the 158 Z-80 
instructions. A MUST reference manual for any user of 
the Z-80. 300 pages. Just off the press* $12,95 



HEAVY OUTYI 

Full Wave Bridge 
2BAMP SOP IV 

$1.25 



Tantalum Capacitors 

1 MFD. .35V. Bv 
Kemet. Axial Lead. 
Best Value! 10/$1. 



G£ 10 AMP Tri^ 
SC146D. House no. 
To-220 case. Rated 

10amps400PIV. 

75c ea. 3/$2. 



Digital Research Corporation 



(OF TEXAS! 



P. O, BOX 401247 • GARLAND, TEXAS 75040 • (214f 271 2461 



N«wl B€AL TIME 
Compuler Clock Chip 

N.S, MMB31 3. Features 
BOTH 7 segment and 
BCD outputs. 2B Pin 
DIP. S4.95 with Pita 



LS SERIES TTL 

74LS00 — 33c 74LS74 — 49c 

74US02 — 35c 74LS90 — 69c 

74LS04 — 3&c 74LS13S— 89c 

74LS08 - 35c 74LS154-=1.49 

74US10 — 33c 74I_S175— i.lO 

74L.S20 — 33c 74LS367— 75c 

74LS73 — 49c 74LS368— e5c 



TERMS: Urders uf%der S\b. add 7&c, No COD's. We 
accept VISA, MasterChar^e and American Express 
Cafd&. Monev Back Guarantee on ail items' Texas 
Residents add 5% Sales Tan. WE PAY POSTAGE! 



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MIRRORED SCALE! 



WESTON 
BIG— SCALE PANEL METER 

Super precision, originally used in Police 
Radar. - 1 MA Movement. Scale Reads 
To 100. Originally cost $46.71 each. Very 
Limited Stock. 

$8.95 ea. 



■ ••***«*^*«*i#<fi«*#«ai%««^~a* *^ 

VARIABLE 
INDUCTOR #2 

By Seimens. Pot Core Style. 
50 To 75 MH. High Q. 





750 



Each 




INSTRUMENT CASE 



The perfect project enclosure. High 
impact plastic with aluminum frottt 
plate. Front plate can be removed 
for drilling. 8x2V2x4!4 inches. These 
were origmalty used for bank secur 
ity equipment. They are BeautiJuM 
Optional mounting bracket swivels 
from top to bottom for easy mount- 
ing. KnuHed thumb screws lock 
the bracket in any position. 




With 
Bracket %pO 



tA 



oto^ 



o\* 



PNP SILICON 



POWER TRANSISTOR 



TO-3 Case. 2N4905. 
Rated 90 Watts. VCEO-60- HFE- 
100 MAX. at 2,5 Amps. A good mate 
for 2N3055 in audio outputs! 
Prime New Units! 

75c each or 4/$2.50 





FULL WAVE BRIDGE 
4 AMP - 200 PIV 



\o 



'^ 



Super Dea 

690 ea. 

COMPUTER MFG. OVERRUN! 



^OT 



^6 



16\ 



-•M 
*■■« 



MALLORY ELECTROLYTIC 
FILTER CAPACITOR 

1500 MFD 16 WVDC. 
Radial Leads. Factory Fresh! 




3 FOR$1 P»/0« 



Perfect for Power Supplies! 
Small Size: ^v^ x ^^ Inches. 



PC BOARD 
EDGE CONNECTORS 



t^ 



€ 



■•»^L,"^ 



^r .■• J.« -fa-a' ^ ' ^- -r 

M0^ 



L& 



75* 



4 FOR $2.50 



36 Pin. Gold Plated. Solder TaiL .156 IN, Spacing. Double 
Rows of 18 Pins. For standard thickness 1.062) PC Boards 
Major U.S. Mfg. 



RCA POWER 
TRANSISTOR 

Number 40254 

PWP Germanium 

75 Watt 60V 5 Amp, 

Same as HEP6013. 

2/$1.00 -VO' 



Tl DRIVER 
TRANSISTOR 

TO-92. HIGH CURRENT NPN. 

IC-400MA VCEO - 40 

HFE 100 TO 300 

TIS-92 10/$1.00 




12V0C Rd3y by COE. 

SPOT. Coil is 280 ohm. 
Small Size, $1^29 



75* 




GE 
TRIAC 



GE 10 AMPTriac 

SCI 460. House no. To'220 case. 

Rated 10 amps 4D0Pi V. 

75(tea. 3/S2,00 




SQUIRREL CAGE BLOWER FAN 



High Output = 30 CFM, Shaded 
pole, 115 VAC 60 HZ. 4.S x 5 
inches. Brand new by Molon 
Motors* Perfect for computers. 



$6.50 each 



EXPERIMENTER'S CRYSTAL '•« 




262 144KHZ Ttiis frequency is 2 
to the leih power Easily divide<f 
down to any power of 2. and even 
to 1HZ. New by CTS-Knight.ASS 

va1ue( 

$1 .25 each 



$1.95 



T. I. ASCn CHARACTER 

IMS 4103 JC. 28 PEN CI£R CIP. Has seven bit 
COLUMN Output for use with Matrix liard copy 
devices. With specs. 
PERFECT FOR TIL-305 7x5 LED Tl DISPLAY! 



*#«H 






Digital Research Corporation 

(OF TEXAS) 

P. O. BOX 401 247 • GARLAND, TEXAS 75040 • (21 4) 271 -2461 



TERMS: Orders under ST5 add 75f No COD s We accept VISA MasterCharge and 

American Express Cards, Money Back Guarantee on all HPims! Texas Residents add 5% 

Sales Tax, 

WE PAY POSTAGE! 



D20 



30 MHZ. FREQUENCY COUNTER KIT 



Our Latest Kit! 
Brand New Design! 

WRITE OR CALL FOR FREE INFO! 



129.95!!! 



■ ••< 

-•#1 

■ •H 
■**i 

•••I 

'••■ 
*•■■ 

•?•- 





>>>5k 



m ^ 



WE'D LIKE TO RELAY 
A SPECIAL TO YOU . . . 

We've got some dandy little reed relays that are 
currently on special. These units are 12V, normally 
open SPSt types that usually go for $1.50. But 
through the cover date of this magazine, you can 
have TWO FOR $1,50 . , . no kidding. 



JUST IN TIME — 
NATIONAL'S 12V CLOCK! 
S16.50 or 31546 

The MAI 003 dock modute Is a complete unit . . . just put t1 
in a package and you're on your way. A built-in time base, 
along with 12V DC operation, make this unit a natural for 
no-hassle car clock installations. Includes (louresceni 
readouts (fiot LEDs) for easy visibility under adverse ambient 
lighting conditions. 



HI-CURRENT VARIABLE 
AUTOTRANSFORMERS 

We used to have a lot of these, but nov^ we're 
down to a few and we want to move them out so we 
can have space for newer goodies. Normally $150 
— but for this last chance, you can get one for 
S125. Quantities are timited. 



VECTORBOARD 

Everybody needs Vectorboard, if our continual need to re- 
order IS any indication. The Kind we carry IsSVa'xl?". 1/16" 
thick, with pre-punched .1 " grid iioles on an apoxy glass 
base. Works weli wUh the Slit N Wrap or Vector's other 
wiring wonder, the Wire Pencil^ to give fast prototypes. Our 
price: $6.39 



RF TRANSISTORS 

i2NRF0 (3/Sl.95^ 3 GHz power transistors for 
oscillator/ampUfier applications. Guaranteed 100 mW out @ 
1.5 GHzL TO 18 package. 

(All specs for the following taken at 25 degrees C at 2 
GH^) 

#aNRF1 (S4.9S) a GHz power !ransistor. Pd max 3.5W, 
Pout minimum LOW, Pin 310 mW, efficiency 30%. Similar to 
RCA 2N5470. 

#2NRF2 ($5,951 2 GHz power transistor. Pd 8.7W, Pout 
2.5W, Pin 300 mW, efficiency 33%. Similar to RCA TA8407, 

#2NRF3 (S6.95) 2 QHz power transistor. Pd 21 W. Poul 
5.5W, Pin 1,25W. efficiency 33%. Similar lo RCA 2N6269, 

#2NRF4 <S7.95) 2 GHz power transistor. Pd 29W, Pout 
7.5W, Pin 1.5W. efliciency 33%. Factory selected prime 
2N6269. 



VECTOR <<5lit'N-Wrap'' 
WRAPPING TOOL: $24.50 

Ever notice that thread boarding goes a iol easier wHh a 
Slit N'Wrap? If not, then you probably don't own 
one . . . which means you should carefuily study the 
following paragraph. 

The Sllt'N-Wrap is a manual wire wrapping tool. It has a 
spool containing a special kind of wire which, when wrapped 
around wrap posts, has Its insulation slit . . . which makes 
excellent contact with the post, both electrically and 
mechanically. This wire may be fed out continuously for 
daisy-chaining connections if desired. And. there's no 
cutting, no stripping, no need to have lots of different si^ed 
wire lengths hanging around. The price includes tool, wire, 
and instructions. 



TTL 

7400 
7401 
7402 
7403 
7404 
7405 
7406 
7407 
7408 
7409 
7410 
7411 . 

7413 . 

7414 . 
7416, 
7417 . 
7420 . 
7422 . 
7425 . 
742e . 
7427 . 
7430 . 
7432 . 

7437 . 

7438 . 

7439 . 

7440 . 
7442 . 

7444 . 

7445 . 

7446 . 

7447 . 
7448, 
7450 . 
7454 , 
7460 

7472 . 

7473 . 

7474 , 

7475 , 

7476 . 
7483 . , , 

I ^t/ul -F ■ fa li A ■ rii 

7486 . 

7489 _ , 

7490 ....... 

t ly t . . t t r * r 

7493 

7495 

7496 , 

74107 ...,,. 
74109 



■#■+<*«■ 



r I 4 d 



W.« * V « -* T « 



$0.18 
$0.20 
$0.20 
$0.20 
$0.21 
$0.22 
$0.33 
$0.36 
$0,23 
$0.23 
$0.18 
$0.22 
S0.45 
SI. 05 
$0.30 
SO, 33 
$0.16 
$0.23 
$0.:^ 
$0.25 
$0.29 
$0.26 
$0.30 
$0.36 
$0.36 
$0.45 
$0.19 
$0.56 
$0.45 
$0.63 
$0.85 
SO.&O 
SO. 83 
$0.18 
S0.18 

mi8 

$0.29 
$0.36 
S0.36 
$0.65 
$0,36 
$0.89 
$0.99 
$0.36 
$1.75 
$0,60 
$0,63 
$0.55 
$0,90 
$0,90 
$0.36 
$0,53 



74121 .... 

74123 

74125/8093 

74126/8094 

74128 

74145 

74148 

74150 

74151 

74153 

74154 

74155 

74156 

74157 

74159 

74160 

74161 

74162 

74163 

74164 

74165 

74173 

74174 

74175 

74176 

74177 

74179 

74160 

74181 

74182 

74190 

74191 

74192 

74193 

74194 

74195 

74196 

74197 

74198 

74199 

74273 

74S287/6301 

82S129 .... 

74S288/8223 

74365 , , _ . 

74366 

74367 

74368 

74390 

74393 . , , . , 

74S471 

75325 ..... 
75492 



a, ^ J. M M ^ f,|. I t i, 

-lllf-lllhlh-hh 
■■ ■■-IJ1 ■ ■ ■ pl>.V*,1^ 

■•■C-i-ff-lBiBfaBl 

...... ^ ^ > k ., . 

:. ...<».^. HI J J 

h + -i- + mm^^**t 1 

mwmwm.mm^ «■«• 
h ■*■... p - - 



$0,45 
$0.65 

$0.50 
$0.53 
$0.65 
$0.63 
$1.25 
$1.07 
$0.71 
$0.71 
S1.23 
S0.71 
S0.90 
$071 
$2.20 
$0.89 
S0.S9 
$0.89 
S0.&9 
$1.34 
SI 34 
$1.34 
$1.52 
$1.34 
$0.89 
$0.88 
$0.75 
$0.98 
$2.23 
$0,80 
STOO 
SI. 00 
$1.34 
$1,34 
$1.34 
$0J1 

$0.98 
S0.96 
$1.96 
$1,89 

$4,38 
$2.50 
$0.69 
$0,69 
$0.69 
$0.69 
$1 50 
$1.50 
$7.50 
$0.65 
$0.82 



Tdrrm: Add S,50 to ofdefs urxier SK3: Col res odd tax. 
Please aHow ig? to 5% tof shipping: excess refurxjed. OOO 
orders occepted with street oddress for UPS. For 
VISA^/Masterchorae^ orders ($15 min) call our 2^3 hour 
order desk a! (415) 562 0636. 





BILL GODBOUT ELECTRONICS 
BOX 2355, OAKLAND AIRPORT CA 94614 



G4 



206 



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MISCELLANEOUS 

RG-174 MinitturvSOn ^xiAs. 
ASU-30 Witv Wrip/ynwf^p mol 
WSil-3DM Modifi«d W>^i.'un«ra¥> tool 
BW^€30 ijttiry OptnM) Wrap Tool 

-Free Wire with any Wm^ Tcwt ^ 
Kiniatur* Squn .0^' 1 0OV Uonpiitfiic Cv 

fND5002 .T2S-CX. 7 Seg, «eod-^..49c- 
2N4Q36 WV, lA PNP SiUcot TO-5 
2N6tOI flOV, IQA NON HI GAIN TO-220 
0.3 VCT, t.2A Tr^nffortrer F41X 
12V, 1A Trviffortntr wtih 6' Pmwr Cord 



. I5,f9 
.J4,65 

12 Si 00 

ia/$t.oa 

100/S&00 

30^1.00 

85c 

ijn 

S-SS 
2,00 
4/S1.0O 
1.O0 
79c 
2,00 
1.49 

m 

tS/IKOO 
iD/SI.OO 



iff/4.25 
34 9S 



THM 6030PB Vertical 
THM 6045B Slip Ov»r 
THM 6070B Extra Ditfpotton Horli 
tHM 607ie Top Hal- fof 6070 
THM 6106PB FlotWith Fing*rt 
THM ^J07PB Smglkr Sixa Flat 
THM 60l3.fl TO-3Diomoftrf 
THM A024-U UnfirtiJ>«i TO-92 
rHM-6a52E rO-3 Squcn 

TQ-220 6 Pice* Mounting Kit - 



25Cp 5A1.00, 
30.;:, 4/tl.OO, 

.35^;, 3/$1.00, 
35^,3/11,00, 
30^, 4/*]. 00, 
25<;, 5/%\ .00, 
69t, 4/$2,50, 
lO/lLOO, 
60^, VS2.50, 

HtfWy PidcksgeH 



tO/J1.90 

m/$2.oo 

I0/S3.00 

i0/$3.00 

lO/$2.00 

10/11 .90 

^0/i5.00 

100/15.00 

ia/H.25 

' 4 il JM^^ 



ea 



Jumfiftf Kits few ,025 Squofs Pottt, * 
All materiol for making jumpwn for 
quick CircuH cKongei ond proto-^ 
typfnfl. Use for broodbool^tn^, 
trouble footing, fiild mKilftcarloni. 
Hh (tondord IC socket wirei/wrop 
^ pOiti. Excel lerrt wlprng octldrv on 

gold pfotad b-ox confoctt. 
J KTt contain [0 box ccx^tacti, haot 

shrEnkablft il««vingr and 5 fe#t of wira plut Enifruet^on 

fh««if, 

JCK-5?0I (5 doubb fuTf^Mfi) S2.7S, 4 1(ifi/il0.00 

DEAUe PRIQNG AVAJIAJLEUPON AeOUfST 




¥tiii-t€k. inc 
pilSKikm, Aruui BS021 

T1 mm iwBMi 



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206 



ALDELCO ELECTRONIC CENTER 



TRAKSFORMERS 

110/18 VAC 1 Amp $1.50 

110/12 VAC 300 mA_ _ . _ . . , . .1.25 

11 0/20^0 VAC 2 Amps 2.50 

110/6 VAC 6 Amps, . , 4,95 

SPECIAL 110/12 VAC plug in 



500 mA 



1 50 



For each 1-5Xmfrs add $1.00 shipping 



MINIATURE SWITCHES 

SPSTonoffon... , $ .99 

DPDTonoffon .1.59 

DPOTon off .^v . . . 1.59 

DPDTon off (wire wrap leads). 1.99 






TURNER HAND MICROPHONE 

DYNAMIC PTT MODEL J360 DM 

Medium Impedance (6005000 

Ohms) 

Freq- Resp> 100-5000 Hz. 

ONLY $10.95 



40 Channel CB Switch 

Cherry #R40a-00AA ONLY $9.95 



SPEAKERS 

2^^"x5" 



8 0hnnRound.$ .65 



8 Ohm Round 
8 Ohm Round. 
100 Ohm Round. 
8 Ohm Oval... 



,.75 
1,00 
1.25 
1.95 



add IO4: per speaker shipping 



NEW! 

THE FUTURE NOW! 

FM2015R 




KDK 



Di^(. ttgar ^nri. CtJvM Tlu N^W 
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All SdJd 8t*t«.CM<0^ PLL digital «rmheil'iBiJ - No Crysti^i ta Buy I 6KHz itap* 
144-149 MHl-LED 6M\%\ rMcLoul PLUS MAI^S-CAP/ 

*S MHiBarcFCoveraga - TOOOChannelsjinBlBid of tha uauB^2MHz:to4MHz-400 
to eOO Ch«r4n«li] • 4 CHAfJNEL f^AM IC MEMORY WITH ;&CANPI^NG « 
MULTIPLE FREOUeiVCV OFFSETS* ELECTflOhliC AUTO TUNING- TRANSMIT 
AND RECEJVE • INTERNAL MULTIPURPOSE TONE OSCILLATOR • RIT • 
Dl S Cfl J M t N ATO R M £ T£ n - 1 & Wart* Qut^ui - Undti uaJad R a«vrvAt $6rtBktl v^ty and 
Selectrvlty - 1fi POLE FILTER MQNOLITHtC CRYSTAL FILTER AND 
AUTOMATIC TUNED RECEIVER FRONTEND,COMPAREI*5jp«rbEnQin»«rmg 
and Superior CommarcHal AvioTiJci Grad-a Qualitv ^i^d ConitruqitlDn Second to 
Nona mx ANY PRICE. 

INTRODUCtORV 
PRICE 



S39900 







MALLORY POTS 1/8" Shaft 
50 K Ohms #4 Taper ..$ ,99 

100 K Ohms #1 Taper 99 

50 K Ohms ¥4** Shaft... -59 
100 K Ohms 1/4'^ Shaft.... 59 
Ansley 16PIN PLUG 
609-fvt161 with cover ..$ .79 
CRYSTAL SOCKETS 

holds6HC25U $ .89 

SingteHC25U 39 

MURATA FILTER 
10.7 mA $1.49 

• RECTIFIERS 

2 amp 50 volt 20 for $1.00 
2 amp 1000 voitIO for $1.00 
2 amp 1500 volt .5 for 1.00 
10 amp stud 50 volt , . 1.50 
10 amp stud 60O volt . 4.50 
40 amp stud 50 volt . . 1.20 
40 amp stud 750 volt . 2.05 

100 amp. stud 200 V. 8.50 
BRIDGES 

2 amp T05 50 volt 35 

2 amp T05 200 volt . _ .50 

2 amp T05 600 volt . . 1.25 

3 amp. 50 volt ....... 30 

3 amp. 400 volt 1.10 

25 amp, 200 volt 1.50 

25 amp. 600 volt .... 5.50 
25 amp. 1000 volt . . .8.50 



ACCUKEYER KIT 




Board Measures 2-5/8" x ^3/S*' 

Improved verstqr of the 
ARRL Handbook Accukeyer. 
Kit Includes PC board, !G 
sockets. iCs. speaker switch 
and all parts and inst met Ions. 
ONLY $19.95 



ACCUKEYER 
MEMORY KIT 

Adaptable to many key en. 
Can store 2 canned 
messages of 30 characters 
each. PC board I C sockets, 
ICs instructions and all 
part£. $13.95 



LOGIC PROBE Krr 

Measures Logic 1, Logic 0, 

and pulsing circuit condition 

NOW Reduced to $995 

LEDS 

Monsanto MV5053 JUMBO 
LED and Holder only . , . , - .25 

LED Holders .10 

J y mbp Red LE DS 6 for $1 ,00 
Jumbo Green, Orange or 
Yellow LEDS 5 for $1,00 

FETS 

40er3 1.55 

MPF1D2 . 55 

2N3B19 .35 

2N5457 .50 

2N54SS , 50 

2NE459.,.. .. B5 

2N54a5 , . , , , SQ 

TTL SPECIALS 

7404 17 

7405 17 

7473 , .32 

7474 .32 

7490 .49 

74116 „ 2.60 

74193 96 

74283... .1.65 

74S00 .25 

74H10.. 25 

74H40 .22 

74374 . , .45 

74L175... 1.25 

Vtfe have more Etems Hsted. 
Send stamp for our cataiog 

CMOS SPECIAL 
401 1 .2S 



ALDELCO KITS 



RF DEVICES 



2N2e76 
ZN3375 
2N3553 
2N3S86 
2 N 392 6 

imMi 

2N55e3 
2N&59Q 
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i\mn 

2^6030 

ZW60a2 

2^6083 

2fJGOfl4 

2N6094 

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2l^eOSB 

2NG(]^7 

GE^6 

GE46 

GE215 

GE216 



\m 
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im 
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7.0W 
i.ow 

3.0W 
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25W 

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25W 
30W 
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tBlW 
3QW 
40W 
12W 
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200 MHf 
400 MN; 
176 MHz 
400 MHz 
175 MNf 
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175 MHi 
175 MHf 
175 WHz 
175 MHz 

175 WHi 

176 MH/ 
175 M Hi 
175 MHi 
175 MHz 
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17&MHZ 
17&MHZ 
175WIHZ 
SO MHz 
27 MHz 
SO MHz 
SO MHz 
SOMHi 



TO&O 
TDSO 
T0S9 
T039 
TO 60 
TO 39 
MT?1 
MT72 
HT72 
T03a 
MT72 
MT72 
HT7? 
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MT7Z 
X106PNP 

xioePNP 

XID6 PNP 
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TOS 
T0220 
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S 12,35 

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1.40 

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4.7S 

7.60 

ID. 25 

1.7Q 

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8.45 

10^5 

12.30 

\%m 

G.SC 

10. 3S 
20 .QQ 

2.15 
S.42 

4.65 
B.97 



DUAL DtGITAL 12/24 HOUR CLOCK KIT 
NOW WITH A NEW WALNUT GRAIN WOOD 
CABINET 




SPARE PAfiTS IN STOCK 
FOR EBC PRODUCTS. 

Cabinets, Components etc. 
for ESC Jr. CBj Marine, Avia- 
tion & DFs. 

2N30&^ 99 

2N39a4ar?fg3SQe 25 

2N5496ar2N610fl .70 

741 or 709 liPmOIP 25 

5&& Trmtr .49 

3N914 1N414S i5fcii 95 

Itt34 iN60 IN&4 lOIOr gg 

CA 302a Dil ftmp 1 50 

LM309KVoHfleg T 10 

2N&fl0l Ucp2N4i9|J ..95 

2NZ369 . , . . ..^D 

2<^&i03 as 

LM709i}( 741 MirtOlPDp Amu 45 

14 qr 16 Pin I C Sicken . 30 



Features; 

12 or 24 Hour OperaHon on either cbck 

Each Clock saparatel;/ controlled 

Freeze feature for time set 

Easy assembly for clock and cabinet 

MODEL ALD5-W ONLY $49.95 

Sflnifl kit as abo¥e In unassembled Black 
Plastic cabinet with Red Filter. 



Model ALD 5-P 
Only $44.95 





NEW! 



Tunable 420 MHz 
Fast Scan TV 
Converter 



xit^ 



TURNABLE HAM TV CONVERTER 



ALARM CLOCK KIT 

6 Big 0.5 LED Displays *■ On Board AC Transformer 
' 12 Hour Format with 24 Hour AJarni * SnooM 
Feature * Elapsed Timer. Timer feature makes this 
Popular in Broadcast Stations, it's a natural for 
cars, boats and campers when used with optional 
cry Stat time base. Fits our standard cabinet, $19.96 
Crystal time base when purchased with clock $2 95 

12 or 24 HOUR DIGITAL CLOCK KIT 

Uses 0.5 Display LED. 5314 Clock Chip. 
Freeze feature far accurate set, fits our 
standard cabinet. ONLY $18.95 

CLOCK CABINETS ea. $4.95 

Woodgrain or black leatfier 
CRYSTAL TIME BASE KIT- 
Includes PC Board, Crystal, afl parts and 
mstructions. $4,95 

CLOCK FILTERS. Blue, Red, Green, 
Amber or Smoke $ .60 

ADJUSTABLE POWER SUPPLY KITS 
5-15Voits500MA $6.95 

1 2-28 Volts 500 MA 6.95 



Receive Fast Scan Amateur TV in the 420 to 450 MHz Band 
with any TV set. Low noise^ high gain rf Amp with Varactor 
tuned Input and outputs. Built in AC supply. Comes in two tone 
walnut h beige cabinet measuring 1 7/8" x 4 1/4" x 41/8". 

Factory wired with 2 year guarantee ♦ S49.95 

Kit (orltjca) circuits prewiredj ..,,.►,,.. $39.99 

ALDELCO DOES IT AGAIN-ANOTHER UNBELIEV- 
ABLE VALUE— OUR BATTERY OPERATED FRE- 
QUENCY COUNTER & DIGITAL CLOCK NOW AVAIL^ 
ABLE— ASSEMBLED AND TESTED AT THE KIT 

PRICE IM ONLY! $99.95 



■% 






e 1^050 



ffiEiQUH(<S':;.fim™?ift: 




QOUPkRE OUR FEATURES'-COMPARB THBIR FEATURES 
THEN— COMPARE OUR PRICE AGAINST THEIRS 



• * Portable use wtien 3 

AA Batteries are installed 



• Comes 
Black & 
cabinet 



In attractive 
White metal 



• Leds turn oft to con- 
serve battery power 

• Ffeq. Range 100 Hz to 
40 MHz Typical 



• Mobile use 12 Volt DC 
Input makes ideal 

mobile set up 

• .00005% accuracy and 
rock stable 

• Switcliable from 
counter to dock without 
losing time 



• 110 Vol! Power Sup- 
ply/Battery Charger op- 
tion — perfect for use in 
Ham Shack 

• Clock can be either 4 
or 6 digit, 12 or 24 hour 

• Clock keeps time even 
In off position 



• Si>[ 

leds. 



8 Gould or GE size AA NtCad Batteries . . 

1 10 Volt AC Plug In Power Supply & Battery Charger, 
Coming Soon 600 MHz Preseaier 



ii-i-i tH i + n 



big 0.4 Display 



SI 7.50 
..4.95 



ALDELCO 



2281A BABYLON TURNPIKE, MERRICK NY 11566 

5T63784555 



Add 5% Shipping. 
U.S. Funds 



Add $1 MO for orders under $10.00. Out of U^S*A., Mexico or Candida add 15% shipping and certified check or money order in 

*2 209 



ASSOCIATED RADIO 

AMERICA'S #1 Real Amateur Radio Store 




Actual current photos of some of our reconditioned equipment. 

We have hundreds of reconditioned Items. Save big with 
confidence. Reconditioned units carry a guarantee. 
We trade - USED on NEW or USED on USED 
We sell - ALL major brands NEW & USED 
We buy - Many types of amateur equipment. 



ASSOCIATED RADIO 

8012 CONSER BOX 4327 
OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS 66204 



91 3-381 -5900 




CALL US WITH YOUR REQUIREMENTS 




WE ALSO SELL MUCH OF OUR TRADE-IN EQUIPMENT BEFORE WE 
RECONDITION IT. THIS WE SELL AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICE. REAL 
BARGAINS FOR THE EXPERIENCED HAM. SEND $1.00 AND YOUR NAME - CALL 
LETTERS AND ADDRESS TO US AND WE'ii SEND YOU NOT ONLY OUR REGULAR 
CATALOG BUT A CURRENT LIST OF UNSERV1CED BARGAINS. abo 



210 







CA E n 
- O o 6 



^ - - © ® 

Q O A £ ■ 



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S |"ou. 



W*- Sft IB S hi 
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HI mui CT-f ^ 



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7294 N,W. 54 STREET 
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33166 



URPLUS 

LECTRONICS 

ORP. 



PHONE: (305) 887-8228 
TWX: 810-848-6085 

WHOLESALE - RETAIL 



RADIO TRANSMITTER 

Type T-20/ARC'5 
5.3 to 7 MC or 4-5.3 MC 
Brand new— Never used- 
Tubes alone are worth the price 

124.95 

onfy 30 left less cover 



^ NORTH ELECTRIC TRANSFORMER - 

2470-9024 
117 V 50/60 Hz— MultipSe wif>dmgs wfll produce: 

+ 24 V dc— 50 Amp 

+ 12 V dc— 100 Amp 

- 12 Vdc— 50 Amp 

Other voltages can be obtained, complete 

with specification sheets— Limited Qty. 

$49.95 $49.95 



KESTER #44-SOLDER 

63/37 Alloy 

.032 diameter. 

— 5lb. Spools Only— 

$6.00 per lb. 



12 Vdc SIRENS 
Very Loud $8.95 



SURPRISE PACKAGE 

Resistors, Caps, Semis, Pots, 
Relays, etc. We guarantee it to be 
$25.00 worth of material Every 
package is different. 

S5.0D 



TEXAS INSTRUMENT 



CERAMIC PRECISION CAPS-ERIE 



5 for 
$8.00 
10 for 
$13.95 




Has 3 stide 
switches— 28 
different keys 
keypads re- 
movable by 
removing 4 
screws. 



47pF^100V 
220 pF— 100 V 
470 pF— 100 V 
500pF-100V 
560 pF— 100 V 
1000 pF— 100 V 
2000 pF— 100 V 



$,10 ea. 
15 for $100 

50 for $3.25 



Wliitd Porcelain 
Egg Insulator 

1Vi"x 1"50cea 
3 for $1 .25 



SIGNAL DIODE 

1N414a 

$ S.OO pef hundred 

$25 DO per thqusand 

or, 15 tor $1.00 



NMn Panel Light 

110 Vac Amber, w/ built In resistor 
& wire leads— 3 for $1.50 



WIREWOUND 
RESISTORS 

.1 Ohm^5W 

,10Ohm'-10W 

@ 15q; each 



POWER MATCH CONVERTER 

Pearce-Simpson 
—Max Loads 30 Watts 
converts: for positive 



6 to 12 Vdc j 
6 to 18 Vdc } 
12 to 24 Vdc I 



or negative 
ground systems 
3Va"x3V2"x2" 
$7.95 



STANCOR TRANSFORMER 

#P*8180B— 117 V in— 

25.2 V ct at 1 Amp 

$3.00 ea., 

2 for $5.00 

3 for $6.50 



PANEL METERS 

2y^"x2V4" also ay*" x3" 
10-0-10 dc Amps . $4.00 ea 

0-20 dc Volts I 
25-0-25 dc Volts > 2 for 

0-25dcVoits I $7.00 

0-50 ac Volts '^ 

-Shunt Required- 



New Dry Nickel-Cadmium Battery 

General Electric 
12-0 Volts dc @ 4.0 Amp hrs. 

$19.95 while they last. 



MUFFIN FANS 

3 Blades, 110 Vac, 4V4"' sq. 

Removed from equipment— 

Excellent condition— $4,95 



"New" MuHin Fans 

3B!adeS'110Vac, 4¥4"sq. 
$9.95 



POWER SUPPLY 

110 AC to 12 VDC 

550 mA 23 Watts 

3y2"w X 4^'h xBVa'd 



$9.95 



HOOK-UP WIRE 

Size 20 or 22— 

various colors— 

rto color selection 

solid 

$6.00/1000' 

$10.002000* 



POLYFOAM COAX— 50R 

Equal to RG174 

$4.95/100^ 

Low Loss 

Polyfoam 

Coax Cable 



TRIMMER CAPS 

Small enough to fit 

In your watch — 

3.5 to 20 pF 

5 to 30 pF 

7 to 40 pF 

$75 ea,. 2 for $1.25 

5 for $3.00 



Heavy Duty Instrument Case 

Grey vinyl over wood — Inside also 
lined w/ vinyl & foam padding. Ftip- 
top w/ handle and keylock w/ key, 

IfisJde dem. 4'A"Dx By*'^W x 10"H 

$25.00 value— $9.95 



Varo Bridge Rectifier 
10 amps. 220 Vdc— $1.50 



E2000 Memory 
52 x 52 

200 WD 
1 2 DG $4,95 



New Boxer Fans 

5 Blades 110V ac 
4 ¥4 "—$11,95 



JOY STICK 

For TV games and hi fi 
with four, lOOK pots 

2W X2W XV' 
with 1" handle— $3.95 



SPECIALS— SPECIALS — SPECIALS-SPECIALS — SPECIALS — SPECIALS- SPECIALS — SPECIALS 



ComputO'r 

Grade Capa 

1000 mr— 50 V 

10000 mf ^20 V 

80O0mf-50V 

36000 mf— 15 V 

63000 mr—!SV 

$2.50 ea. 



cnrs 

DIP SwItclvBft 
e position 
7 position 
e posJtlon 
S1.2SS9,, 
2 for £2.00 



Trlnim«r Cap 

Areo/Elmenco 
PG402 
2 to 20 pF 
$.60 ea. 
5 for SZ50, 
15 for S5.00 



MA&SA 

UMrasonle 

Trvnsduetr 

37 or 40 hH2 

$1.60 ea. 
2 for S2.50. 
5 tor t5.00 



4PDT-1ia Vdc 
6050 Ohm coll 
10 Amp contacts 
11.50 ea. 

2 for $2.?5, 

3 for $3v2& 



Sourjis 
Trimpot 

#20OL— 1— Z01M 

200 Ohm 

$1,50 ea., 

2 tor $2,50, 

5 for $6. 75 




Sttncor 
Traiutl print r 

fpseso 

Step down^iaolatlon 

i17Vpai'12Ve,5Ainp. 

w/cord & receptacle 

S5.95 



TERMS: 



Alt matefiai guaranteed 9 if for any fsason you are noi satisfied, our pfoducis m ay bg ni mn^ d within 10 days for a futi rsfi/nd(fess shipp/ng} Ptease add $3 
for shipping snd handfing on aft Qfdefs. Additionaf S% chsrge tot shipping any ttem over 5 its. COD'S accepted tor orders totaling $50.00 or more. All ordets 
shipped UPS unf^ss ottmrwtse specified. florWa residents pfease add 4*A ^ales tax. Mimmum prder $15.00. 



EQUIPMENT / COMPONENTS / WlRESt CABLE / ACCESSORJES 



2t2 



I 

i 



Social E/ents 



from page 775 

Jacksonville hamfest which 
will be held on August 5 and 6, 
at the Jacksonville Beach 
Municipal AudMorium. Ac- 
tivities will include the usual 
swap tables and exhibitors' 
displays. Featured programs 
include a OX presentation by 
the North Florida DX Assn. on 
that group's recent DXpeditton 
to Haiti at the invitation of the 
Haitian government. Shortly 
after the trip, amateur radio 
vi/as legalized in Haiti after be- 
ing outlawed for many years. 
NFDXA also has two CO 
Magazine world champion- 
ships to their credit. A com- 
plete seminar on microproces- 
sors will atsc be featured, 
along with a "pileup" contest, 
hidden transmitter hunt. QLF 
contest, and ARRL meeting. 
Advanced tickets are now avail- 
able for $2.50 par person ($3 at 
the door), with swap tabies 
available for $5 per day. The 
hamfest site is only one block 
from the Atlantic Ocean, and 
those attending can bring their 
famiiies for a weekend of fun 
on the l>each. Door prizes and 
hourly drawings wilt be con^ 
ducted. All inquiries should be 
directed to N4UF, Hamfest 
Chairman, 911 Rio St. Johns 
Dr., Jacksonville FL 32211. 
Phone is 744-9501 . 

UPPER ST, CLAIR 

TOWNSHIP PA 

AUG 6 

The 41st annua! hamfest of 
the South Hills Brass Pounders 
and Modutators will be held on 
August 6, 1978, from noon to 
dusk« at St. Clair Beach on 
Route 19 south, Upper St. Ciair 
Township. There will be a swap 
and shop, picnic area, and 
swimming for the family. 
Mobile check-in on 29.0 MHz 
and 146.52 simplex. Informa- 
tion and preregistration for 
$1.50 ($2,00 at the door) are 
available from Bruce Banister, 
5954 Leprechaun Dr., Bethel 
Park PA 15102. Vendors must 
register. 

AMARILLO TX 
AUG 1M3 

The 1978 edition of the 
Golden Spread Amateur Radio 
Convention will be held at the 
Holiday Inn West Motor Hotel, 
601 Amarillo Blvd. West, 
Amarillo, Texas, on Friday 
evening, Saturday, and Sunday* 
August 11, 12, and 13, 1978. It is 
sponsored by the Panhandle 
Amateur Radio Club of 
Amarillo, An area has been set 
aside for amateurs to display 
their trading and swapping 
gear Two Hospitality Hours are 



slated: one for early arrivals the 
evening of Aug. 11 and the sec- 
ond for Saturday evening, Aug. 
12. Six technical sessions will 
be held, featuring the very 
latest in communications ex- 
pertise. Special activities for 
the ladies will be available so 
that there will be something for 
everyone. Preregistration will 
be S4.00 per person; registra- 
tion at the door will be S6.00. 

LEXINGTON KY 
AUG 13 

The Bluegrass Amateur 
Radio Club TLexinglon, Ken* 
tucky) will hold its annual Cen- 
tral Kentucky Hamfest on 
August 13, 1978, at the Lex- 
ington National Guard Armory 
located adjacent to the 
Bluegrass F eld on Airport 
Road, Lexington, Kentucky. 
The hamfest program will in- 
clude grand prizes, hourly door 
prizes, manufacturers' ex- 
hibits, an indoor/outdoor flea 
market, guest speakers, and 
forums. 

CEDARTOWN GA 
AUG 13 

The Cedar Valley Amateur 
Radio Club of Cedartown, 
Georgia, will sponsor the Cedar 
Valley Hamfest, which will be 
held on August 13, 1978, from 9 
am to 4 pm, at the Polk County 
Fairgrounds located one mile 
east of Cedartown on US 278. 
Talk-in frequency will be 
(WR4AZU) 147. 72/. 12. Food, 
drinks and lots of prizes! For 
more information, please con- 
tact Jim T. Schllestett. Pres., 
W4IMQ, Cedar Valley ARC, PO 
Box 93. Cedartown GA 30126; 
telephone; (404)746-5968. 

WILLOW SPRINGS IL 
AUG 13 

The Hamf esters 44th annual 
picnic and hamfest will be held 
on Sunday, August 13, 1978, at 
Santa Fe Park. 91st and Wolf 
Road, Willow Springs J lltnois* a 
southwest suburb of Chicago. 
There will be exhibits for OMs 
and XYLs and the famous 
swappers' row. Tickets at the 
gate will be $2.00; in advance, 
$1.50. For hamfest information 
or advance tickets, send check 
or money order (SASE ap- 
preciated) to Bob Hayes, 18931 
Cedar Ave., Country Club Hills, 
IJIinois 60477, 

ROCHESTER PA 
AUG 19 
The Beaver Valley Amateur 

Radio Association's first an- 
nual hamfest will be held on 
Saturday, August 19, from 9 am 
to 5 pm at Brady's Run Park 
located 5 miles north of 
Rochester PA on Route 51. Ad- 



vance tickets are $3.00 or three 
for SBvOO; at the gate, they'll be 
$4.00 or three for $10.00. 
Seller's fee is $1 .00— bring your 
own table. There will be a flea 
market for new and used equip- 
ment. Camping spaces, swim- 
ming, boating and fishing are 
available at the park. Refresh- 
ments will be available. Prizes: 
{1st) Kenwood TS-520S, (2nd) 
Midland 13-500 2 meter FM 
transceiver, (3rd) DenTron 
Super Tuner. Talk-in on 25/85; 
check-in on 52/52, For more in- 
formation, write Wayne R. 
Sphar WA3ZMS, Secretary 
BVARA, 1200 Atlantic Ave., 
Monaca PA 15061. 

HAM DEN CT 
AUG 20 

The WELI Amateur Radio 
Club's second annual flea 
market and auction will be held 
on Sunday, August 20 (rain date 
August 27) from 10:00 am to 
4:00 pm at Radio Towers Park, 
Benham St., Hamden, Connect* 
icut. General admission wilt be 
$.50, and vendor spaces are 
S5.00 each. For further informa- 
tion, contact Mike WA1PXM at 
934-1063 or Dave WA12WB at 
467-3258 {area code 203). 

HUNTSVILLE AL 
AUG 20 

The North Alabama hamfest 
will be held on Sunday, August 
20, 1978, at The Mall in Hunts- 
vilie AL. There will be prizes, a 
large flea market, an ARRL 
forum, MARS meetings, and 
ladies activities, A hamfest 
supper will be held on Saturday 
night. For more information, 
write to N.A.H.A., PO Box 423, 
HuntsvilteAL 35804. 

WENTZVILLE MO 
AUG 27 

The Saint Charles Amateur 
Radio Club, Inc., will hold the 
SCARC Hamfest V8 on August 
27 at the Wentzville Community 
Club, There will be prizes, food, 
and fun— flea market, CW con- 
test, free bingo, food, beer, and 
more. Admission will be S1 per 
car. Talk-in on 34/94 and 07/67, 
For motel and camping infor- 
mation, prize lists, dealer reser- 
vations, and airport pickup, 
write to SCARC, PO Box 1429, 
St. Charies MO 63301. 

MONTICELLO IN 

AUG a? 

The Tioga Amateur Radio 
Society. Monticello, Indiana, 
will sponsor a ham radio cruise 
day on Lake Freeman on Sun- 
day, August 27, 1978, It will take 
place aboard the Madam 
Carroll boat — the largest in- 
land boat in Indiana with a 
length of 135 feet and abeam of 
36 feet. Fun for the entire fami- 
ly. There will be 4 rigs aboard. 
You can work amateur radio 
from a marine mobile— special 
certificates and QSL cards for 



this operation. Decks open ai 
1:00 pm for 2 cruises at 2:00 pm 
and 4:00 pm. Advance tickets 
are $2.00; at the dock, $2.50. 
Send an BASE to Byron Rob- 
bins WD9EXI SecV. 571 South 
Bluff St., Monticello, Indiana 
47960. for advance tickets or 
further details. 

BUTLER PA 
SEP 10 

The Butler County Hamfest, 
sponsored by the Butler County 
ARA, will be held on Sunday, 
September 10, from 11 am to 4 
pm at the Butler County Farm 
Show Grounds, adjacent to 
Butler Roe Airport {with a paved 
runway for fly-ins). ChaGk-ins 
on 147.90/.30 and .52 simplex. 
Contact John K3HJH or Cliff 
WB3CDA for more details. 

FINDLAYOH 
SEPT 10 

The second largest hamfest 
in Ohio, the 36th annual Findlay 
hamfest, will be held on 
September 10, 1978, rain or 
shfne, at Riverside Park from 5 
am to 5 pm. Watch for direc- 
tional signs. There will be free 
parking, free reserved indoor 
space (taring your own tables), a 
massive swap and shop, and 
lots of prizes. A 2 meter hunt 
will be held at 1 pm and the 
main prize drawing at 3 pm. 
Tickets are $1 .50 in advance, $2 
at the door. Talk-in and prize 
check-in on 146.52. For tickets, 
space reservation, and further 
information, send an BASE to 
Clark Folt2 W8UN, 122 West 
Hobart Ave., Findlay, Ohio 
46840. 

TYSONS CORNER VA 
SEPT 16-17 

DXPO 78 will be held on 
September 16-17, 1978, at the 
Ramada Inn at Tysons Corner, 
Northern Virginia (intersection 
of routes 7, 123, and 495). It's 
one of the world's greatest DX 
events ... if you attended DX* 
PO 74 and DXPO 76, you know 
what we are talking about. You 
will receive an advance pro- 
gram, but mark your calendar 
now! If you have not attended 
one of our DXPOs, get your 
name on the mailing list for the 
advance program and details. 
Write to Richard Vincent K3A0, 
Route 1 Box 230, Bryantown, 
MP 20617. 

SYRACUSE NY 
OCT 7 

October 7, 1 978, from 9:00 am 
until 6:00 pm, will be the date 
and time for this year's annual 
Radio Amateurs of Greater 
Syracuse hamfest. The event 
will be held at the New York 
State Fairgrounds, located ad- 
jacent to Interstate route 690. 3 
miles southeast of New York 
State Thruway, Exit 39, one 
mile northwest of Syracuse. 



213 



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215 



• NOVICE STUDY GU(DE— SG7357— Here is a completely new study guide and reference book for the potential ham. This is not a 
question/answer memorization course. Electronic and radio fundamentals are presented and expSained In an easy4o*ynderstand 
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and sync generators, frequency counters, digital component 
testers, logic probes and more! Plus a cumulative index for all four 
volumes oT the 73 Test Equipment Library, $4.95.* 

• INTRODUCTION TO RTTY—BK7380— A beginner's guide to 
radioteletype Including teletypewriter fundamentals, signals, 
distortion and RTTY art. You can be a RTTY artist! A 73 publica- 
tion. $2.00/ 




*3m, and 
Jnang/e 

Antennai 




HftHBBOOK 




'- O 




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• RTLCOOKBOOK— BK1046— by Donald Lancaster. Explains the how 
and why of RTL (Resistor-Transistor Logic) and gives design informa- 
tion that can be put to practical use. Gives a multitude of digital ap- 
plications ranging from the basic switch to the sophisticated counter. 
240 pages; 5Vi x 8Vi; soft bound. 5.50/ 

• TVT COOKBOOK— BK1 064— by Donald Lancaster. Describes the 
use of a standard television receiver as a microprocessor CRT terminal. 
Explains and describes character generation, cursor control and inter- 
face information In typical, easy-to-understand Lancaster style. This 
book Is a required text for both the microcomputer enthusiast and the 
amateur RTTY operator who desires a quiet alternative to noisy 
teletype machines. $9.95.* 

• TTL COOKBOOK— BK1063— by Donald Lancaster. Explains what 
TTL is, how it works, and how to use it. Discusses practical applica- 
tions, such as a digital voltmeter, and display system, events, counter, 
electronic stopwatch, digital voltmeter, and a digital tachometer. 336 
pages; SVa X 8yi;softbound. $8.95.* •FASCINATING WORLD OF RADIO COMMUNICA 

TION —BK1 01 8— Interesting stories in the history of radio pioneer- 
I ^^^^ ^'^ iv "'^■^^^^'^"1 '^^ ^^^ discovery. Also includes the fundamentals of broadcast 

I ^ ^^mtHi^M S -^BmKk I band DXing. A must for every radio amateur. $3.95:* 

• PRACTICAL TEST INSTRUMENTS YOU CAN 
8UILD — BK1100— 37 simple test instruments you can 
make- covers VOMs, VTVMs, semiconductor testing units, dip 
meters, wattmeters, and just about anything else you might need 
around the test tab and ham shack. $4.95. " 

• 1001 PRACTICAL ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS— BK1082-Tabs 
new 1001 circuits is available for only $9,95 ppd. The next time you 
want a circuit for just about anything, eat your heart out that you 
didn*t send for this book the first time you read about it. You'd bet- 
ter order the book right away, before they run out. $9.95.* 

• HOW TO MAKE BETTER QSLs— BK7326— Be proud of your QSL 
cards . , , have a card which gets front space on every hamshack 
wall . . . win prizes at hamfests. The onty way to have a truly 
outstanding card is to make it yourself, which is easy when you 
have this new book. $2.50. • 

• WHAT TO DO AFTER YOU HIT RETURN^BK1071— PCC*s first book of 
computer games ... 48 different computer games you can play in 
BASIC . . . programs, descriptions, many illustrations. Lunar Landing, Ham- 
murabi, King, Cfvil 2, Qubic 5, Taxman, Star Trek, Crash, Market, etc. $8.00/ 

• BAStC COMPUTER GAMES— MtCROCOMPUTER EDITION-BK1074— 

(formerly 101 BASIC Computer Games). More than 100 games, from very 
simple to real buggers. Included is description of the games, the listing to 
put in your computer and a sample run to show you how they worH. Any one 
game is worth more than the price of the book for the fun you will havel 
$7.50/ 

• BASIC— BK1081-^ by Bob Albrecht. Seff-teaching guide to the computer 
language you will need to know for use with your microcomputer. 324 pages. 
This Is one of the easiest ways to learn computer programming. $4.95/ 

• THE UNDERGROUND BUYING GUIDE— BK1067— Here is a handy guide 
for the electronics enthusiast. Over 600 sources of equipment and literature 
are provided; some are mall-order-only outfits that do not advertise. Sources 
are listed alphabetically, by service or product, and by state. The guide is 
cross-referenced for ease of use. Electronic publishing houses are also 
listed. Published by RMS Publishing Co, $5.95/ 






• AN INTRODUCTION TO MICROCOMPUTERS— BKI 030 <Vol, I), BK1031 

(Vol. 11)— by Adam Osborne Associates, are references dealing with 
microcomputer architecture in general and specifically with details about 
most of the common chips. These books are not software-oriented, but are 
invaluable for the hobbyist who is into building his own interfaces and pro- 
cessor. Volume I is dedicated to general hardware theory related to mJcros, 
and Volume II discusses the practical details of each micro chip. (Detailed 
review in KitotaudttZ) Published by Osborne Associates, VoiJ— $7.50*; Vol. 
II— $12.50/ 

• 8080 PROGRAMMING FOR LOGIC DESIGN— BK1078— Ideal reference 
for the person desiring an in-depth understanding of the 8080 processor. 
The work is application-oriented, and the 8030 Is discussed in light of replac- 
ing conventional, hard-wired logic systems. Both hardware and software are 
described. Practical design considerations are provided for the implementa- 
tion of an 80S0-based control system. (Detailed review in Kilobaud Mi) 
Published by Osborne Associates. $7.50.* 

• 6800 PROGRAMMING FOR LOGIC DESIGN— BK1077— Oriented toward 
ttie industrial user, describes the process by which conventional logic can 
be replaced by a 6800 microprocessor. Hardware, software, and interfacing 
techniques are discussed. This reference provides practical information 
that allows an experimenter to design a complete micro control system from 
the "ground up." An excellent reference! Published by Osborne Associates. 
$7.50.' 



Use the order card in the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 
^ 73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458, Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information. 

Add $1.00 handling charge for orders under $10.00. Note: Prices subject to change on books not published by 73 Magazine. 



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k ^^ «. 



*^ICHOCO*KPlfTEn 







.I*H" 





• 6800 SOFTWARE GOURMET GUfDE 
AND COOKBOOK— BK1075-Thrs manual 
describes sorting, searching, and many 
other routines for the 6800 user. $10.95.* 

• 8080 SOFTWARE GOURMET GUiDE 
AND COOKBOOK— BK1 102— Describes 

sorting, searching, and many other 
routines for the 8080 user. $9.95/ 

• CMOS COOKBOOK— BK1 011- by Don 

Lancaster. Another winner from the author 
of the RTL and TTL Cookbooks. Detaiis the 
appilcation of CMOS, the low power logic 
family suitable for most applications 
presently dominated by TTL. Eight 
chapters cover ail facets of CMOS logic, 
prefaced by 100 pages detailing the 
characteristics of most CMOS circuits. Re- 
quired reading for every serious digital ex- 
perimenter. S9.95.' 

• HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE HERE— 

BK7322— If you (or a friend) want to come 
up to speed on how computers 
work , - , hardware and software . . . this is 
an excellent book. It starts with the fun- 
damentals and explains the circuits, the 
basics of programming, along with a 
couple TVT construction projects, ASCII- 
Baudot, etc. It has (he highest recommen- 
dations as a teaching aid for newcomers, 
$4,95/ 

• FUN WITH COMPUTERS AND BASIC— 
BK1021— by Donald D, Spencer, contains 
an easy-tO'understand explanation of the 
BASIC Programming Language and is in- 
tended for persons who have had no 
previous exposure to computer program- 
minmg but want to learn BASIC quickly^ 
easily, and Interestingly, Over half the 
book is devoted to problems using games, 
puzzles, and mathematical recreations 
(you don't need a math background to 
understand most of the problems in this 
book). A superior book for seif'teaching 
and fearning computer programming. 
$6.95. * 



ii^JiliHW . 




^ k 



• MICROCOMPUTER OtCTIONARY—BKl 034— fills the urgent 

need to become quickly acquainted with the terminology and 
nomenclature of the revolution In computers. Over 5000 defini- 
tions of terms and concepts (704 pages} relating to 
microprocessors, microcomputers and microcontrollers. There is 
also a comprehensive electronics/computer abbreviations and 
acronyms section- $15.95/ 

• COMPUTER PROGRAMMING HANDBOOK— BK1014— by Peter 
Stark. A complete guide to computer programming and data pro- 
cessing. Includes many worked out examples and history of com* 
puters. $9.95.* 

• MY COMPUTER LIKES ME . . .WHEN I SPEAK BASIC— 

BK1039— An introduction to BASIC ... simple enough for your 
kids. If you want to teach BASIC to anyone quickly, this booklet is 
the way togo, S2.00.* 





•THE STORY OF COMPUTERS— 

BK1056— by Donald D. Spencer is to com- 
puter books what Dick and Jane is to 
novels . . . extremely elementary, gives the 
non-computerist a faJr idea of what the 
hobbyist is talking about when he speaks 
computer Nngo, Attempts to explain what 
computers are and can do. $4.95.* 

• MICROCOMPUTER PRIMER- BK1035 

—by Mitchell Waite and Michael Pardee. 
Describes basfc computer theory, 
describes the world of mtcrocomputing in 
"real world*' terminology, explains 
numbering systems, and Introduces the 
reader to the world of programming. There 
is probabfy no better way of getting in- 
volved with the exciting new hobby of 
microcomputing, $7,95/ 

• INTRODUCTION TO MICROPROCES- 
SORS— BK 1032— by Charles Rockwell of 
MICROLOG* An ideal reference for the in- 
dividual desiring to understand the hard- 
ware aspects of microprocessor systems. 
Describes the hardware details of com- 
puter devices in terms the beginner can 
understand, instead of treating the micro 
chip as "black box." Addressing schemes, 
registers, control, and memory are all ex- 
plained. General information about hard- 
ware systems is provided. Specific 
systems are not described and program- 
ming is only briefly discussed. $17.50.* US 
and Canada, $20 elsewhere, 

• THE NEW HOBBY COMPUTERS! — 
BK7340— This book takas It from where 
Hobby Computers Ate Here leaves off, 
with chapters on Large Scale Intergration, 
how to choose a microprocessor chip, an 
Introduction to programming, low cost I/O 
for a computer, computer arithmetic, 
checking memory boards, a Baudot 
monitor/editor system, an audible logic 
probe for finding those tough problems, a 
ham's computer, a computer QSO 
machine . , . and much, much morel 
$4.95/ 

• KILOBAUD: THE SMALL COMPUTER 
MAGAZINE written for the non^PhO com- 
puter hobbyist who wants to know what's 
new. $2.00 each at the newsstand, $15.00 
for 1 year sub. 



Use the order card In the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mait to: 
^ 73 Radro Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458. Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information. 

Add $1.00 handling charge for orders under $10.00. Note; Prices subject to change on books not published by 73 Magazine. 



CALL us TOLL FREE 1-[800] 258-5473 



^ ^ 



• COMPUTER DICTIONARY-BK1013— 

by Donald D. Spencer. Defines words and 
acronyms used by computerists in a clear, 
easy to understand style. Over 2000 defini- 
tions are provided. This reference is a musl 
for the individual getting started m the 
world of microcomputers. Published by 
Camelot Press. $5.95.* 

• CHEMISTRY WITH A COMPUTER— 
BK1010— by Paul A, Cauchon. Contains a 
collection of tutorialt simulation and 
problem-generation computer programs. 
Simulations provide models of lengthy 
iaboratory expertmentation beyond the 
iimited classroom timeframe and 
enhancement of course studies by en* 
coy raging pre laboratory research. 
Useable with almost any chemistry course 
at the high school or coltege level Written 
in BASia S9.95/ 

• TYCHON^S aoaO OCTAL CODE CARD- 
CC1066— SHde rule-like aid for program* 
ming and debugging 8080 software... 
contains all the mnemonics and cor- 
responding octal codes. Only BVn x 3 
inches, provides neat, logical format for 
qulcl< reference. Back side of card is 
printed with an ASCII code chart for 128 
characters plus the 8080 status word and 
register pair codes. Also available, 
Tychon's 8080 Hex Code Card— CC1 065— 
same as above, only has hex codes in- 
stead of octal- S3.00' each. 

• 1976 PERIODICAL QUtDE FOR COMPU- 
TER I STS~BK 1041— is a 20- page book 
which indexes over 1,000 personal com* 
puting articles for the entire year of 1976 
from BytBr Creative Computing, Digitaf 
Desipn, Or. Dobbs Journal, EuN, Elec- 
tronic Desfgn, Etecfronics, Interfaoe Age, 
MicFofrek, Peoples Computer Company, 
Popular Efeclronics, QST, Radio Elec- 
tronics, sees Interface and 73, Articles 
are indexed under more than 100 subject 
categories. $3.00.* New January through 
June 1977 Edition— BK1 042 -S3.00/ 

•LSIIt POCKET REFERENCE 

CARD-CC2011— A must for Heath H11 
usersl Contains complete listings of the 
LSI-11 instruction set by op code and 
mnemonic, console ODT command list, 
device addresses. Q-Bus Pinning and 
more. From Digital Equipment Corpora- 
tion. $1.00.' 

• A QUICK LOOK AT BAStC— BK1043— 
by Donald D. Spencer. A perfect reference 
for the beginning programmer. Assumes 
that the reader has no previous program- 
ming experience, A self-teaching guide for 
the individual desiring to learn the fun- 
damentals of BASIC, the most common 
hobbyist programming language. $4.95/ 

• HOME COMPUTERS: 2^^ Questions and 
Answtrs-BK1023 (Vol. I), BK1024 (Vol. 
II) — by Rich Didday. Two books aimed ex- 
clusively at the novice computer hob- 
byist/home computer user. Written in a 
rather unusual style which has a beginner 
asking questions which are answered by a 
person with a substantial background in 
computers and personal computing. The 
quest ions are lust the kind beginners 
come up with , . . and the answers are 
presented in easy-to-understand terms 
(usually with a diagram to Illustrate the 
point). Both the hardware and software 
aspects of home computing are covered 
from A to Z. An index in both books makes 
them ideal as reference material for 
anyone. Volume I: Hardware— S7.95*; 
Volume II: Software— $6.95,* 



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• SIXTY CHALLENGING PROBLEMS 
WITH BASIC SOLUTIONS~BK1073- by 

Donald Spencer. Provides the serious stu- 
dent of BASIC programming with in- 
teresting problems and solutions. No 
knowledge of math above algebra re- 
quired. Includes gameSt programs for 
financial interest, conversions and 
numeric manipulations. $6.95.* 

• SOME COMMON BASIC PROGRAMS — 
BK1 053— published by Adam Osborne & 
Associates, Inc. Perfect for non-technical 
computerists requiring ready-to*yse pro- 
grams. Business programs like deprecia- 
tion formulas, loan payment solutions and 
loan Interest rates; math routines contain- 
ing statistical packages and polynomial 
derivations . . . ptus miscellaneous pro* 
grams, invaluable for the user who Is not 
an experienced programmer. All will 
operate in the stand-alone mode. Paper- 
back. $7.50.' 

• THE SECRET GUIDE TO COMPUTERS— 
BK1050 (Part I), BK1051 (Part II), BK1052 
(Part ill)— Parts 1,2. and 3 by Russ Walter 
Part One describes computers in general, 
and after reading for ten minutes you will 
be writing simple BASIC programsl 
Employs a step-by-step teaching process, 
the end result being a working knowledge 
of BASIC. Part Two discusses computer 
applications. It's one thing to master the 
syntax of a language such as BASIC and 
another to solve problems using the new 
tool. This also provides useful techniques 
in problem solving. Part Three describes 
programming languages. Ever heard of 
APL and QUSP? BASIC is not the only 
language used to program computers, and 
as the hobby industry grows additional 
languages will become commonplace- 
Seventh edition. Part I— $2. 76*; Part 
II— $2.50*; Part lU— $3.50/ 

• FORTRAN PROGRAMMING— BK1019 
—by Donald Spencer. If you are familiar 
with BASIC you will appreciate the addi- 
tional capabilities of FORTRAN, a com- 
puter language with most of BASIC^s 
features, and much morel FORTRAN was 
designed for complex numeric calcula- 
tions, and possesses extended I/O 
capability. It is easily learned, as It Is an 
English-like computer language. $7.95.* 

• FORTRAN WORKBOOK— BK1020— by 
Donald Spencer. Provides practical ex- 
amples and problems to solve. Almost all 
micros support BASIC— it won*t be long 
before FORTRAN is commonplace. Don't 
miss the programming boat . . . learn FOR- 
TRAN; and be ready for the next language 
boom! $4,95/ 

• SciontiHc Research Instruments' BASIC 
SOFTWARE LIBRARY— LB1002 (Vol. l>, 
LB 1003 (Vol. II), LB 1004 (Vol. Ill), LB 1005 
(Vol IV), LB1006 (VoL V)^Wrltten in 
everybody's BASIC Immediately ex* 
©cutable in ANY computer with at least 4K, 
no other peripherals needed. VoL I con- 
tains business and recreational programs 
and is 300 pages. VoL II is 260 pages and 
contains math, engineering, statistics and 
plotting programs. VoL III contains money 
managing, advanced business programs 
such as billing, A/R, inventory, payroll, etc. 
VoL IV contains general purpose programs 
like loans, rates, retirement, plus games: 
Poker, Enterprise (take charge while Capt. 
Kirk is away), FootbatI and more! VoL V Is 
filled with experimenter's programs in- 
cluding games, pictures and misc. prob- 
terns like *' logic;' Vols. I and II $24.95' 
each. VoL \\\ J39.95/ VoL IV and V $9.95' 
each. 



Use the order card In the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mall to: 
^ 73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458. Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information. 

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• MICROPROCESSORS FROM CHIPS TO 

SYSTEMS— BK 1036— by Rodnay Zaks is a 
complete and detailed introduction to 
microprocessors and microcomputer 
systems, No preliminary knowledge of 
computers or microprocessors is required 
to read this book, although a basic 
engineering knowledge is naturally an ad- 
vantage. Intended for all wishing to 
understand the concepts, techniques and 
components of microprocessors in a short 
time, $9,95.* 

• MICROPROCESSOR INTERFACING 
TECHNIQUES— BK1037— by Austin Lesea 
& Rodnay Zaks wilt teach you how to inter- 
connect a complete system and interface 
it to all the usual peripherals. It covers 
hardware and software skills and tech- 
niques, including the use and design of 
model buses such as the IEEE 468 or S1 00. 

$^i^0, 

• THE "COMPULATOR" BOOK Building 
Super Calculators & Minicomputer Hard' 
ware with CaJcuJator Chips— 8K1012~by 
R. P. Haviland provides ideas, design info 
and printed circuit boards for calculator 
chip projects, measure time, tie-in with a 
Teletype to create a virtually infinite 
memory system, and counliess other func- 
tions. $7,95,* 

• MICROPROCESSOR PROGRAMMING 
for Computer Hobbyists— BK1038— by 
Neil Graham Is for the hobbyist interested 
In intermediate and advanced techniques 
of programming and data structuring. 
Written to take up where the computer 
manufacturers* Instruction manuals and 
the introductory programming language 
text leaves off. $8,95,* 

• DISCOV^BINO BASIC— A Problem Soh^ 

Ing Approach- BKt01 7— by Robert E. 
Smith deals with progressively more com- 
plex problems which allow the reader to 
discover the vocabulary of BASIC 
language as ha develops skill and con- 
fidence in putting It to work. Clear and con- 
cise expianatlons. Problems used cover a 
wide range of interests — insurance, 
geometry, puz2les, economics, etc. $6.85.* 

• BUILD-IT BOOK OF OIGITAL ELEC* 
TRONIC TIMEPIECES-BK1008— by 
Robert Haviland is a data-packed guide to 
building every timekeeping device you can 
imagine: rugged shipboard clocks, sec- 
ond-splitting digital iC chronometers, 
decorator digital clocks, a precision timer, 
a frequency-period meter, a tide and moon 
clock, an automatic alarm setter, etc. In- 
cludes full-size printed circuit board 
layouts. $6.95.* 

• INTRODUCTION TO RTTY— BK7380— A 
begmner's guide to radloteletype in- 
cluding teletypewriter fundamentals, 
signals, distortion and RTTY art. You can 
be a RTTY artist 1 A 73 publication. $ZOa* 



Introduction to RTTY 



A Beginners Guide To 
Radloteletype 



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• THE COMPUTER QUIZ BOOK — 

BK10T5— by Donaid D. Spencer is written 
for readers who woutd like to test 
themselves on basic computer concepts. 
It may be used eftectivefy by students, 
teachers, laymen, programmerSp personal 
computer users^ or anyone else interested 
In checking their knowledge of computer 
concepts. $5.95/ 

• MASTER HANDBOOK OF HAM RADIO 

CIRCUiTS — 8K1033— This is an en- 
cyclopedia of amateur radio circuits^ 
gleaned from past issues of 73 Magazine 
and carefulty selected according to ap- 
plication. You'll find many you've never 
seen before, some new twists on the tried 
and true, and several that have been long 
forgotten but are well worth remembering. 
Where your Interest ranges from ragchew* 
ing to EME, formCW to slow-scan TV, from 
DX to county nets, this handbook will be a 
welcome addition to your shack, $8-95.* 

• HOW TO BUY AND USE MINIOOM- 
PUTERS AND MICROCOMPUTERS — 
BK 1025— by Wm. Barden, Jr. This book 
discusses these smaller brethren of com- 
puters and shows how the reader can 
become a part of the revolution — how he 
can own and use a functioning computer 
system in his home to do a variety of prac- 
tical or recreational tasks. $9.95/ 

• HOW TO PROGRAM MICROCOMPUT- 
ERS— BK1027— by Wm. Barden, Jr. Here 
Is a guide to assembly language program- 
ming of the Intel 8080, Motorola MC6800, 
and MOS Technoiogy MCS6502 micropro- 
cessors. It is written especially for beginn- 
ing programmers with hobbyist microcom- 
puters based on one of these three chips. 
The topics covered range from data 
manipulations at the bit level up to data 
handling of tables and lists, and from sim- 
ple adds and subtracts up to ftoating-point 
operations. $8.95/ 

• YOUR OWN COMPUTER-BK1072— by 
M. Waite and M. Pardee. The personal 
computer has been touted as the next con- 
sumer product. But most individuals stiil 
wonder why. Much technical material for 
the average individual without an exten- 
sive background *n electronics. This book 
removes the stigma of complexity that sur- 
rounds the computer and has succeeded 
In providing a simple easy-to-understand 
guide to these units. $1.95.' 

• IC TIIWER COOKBOOK^BKl029^by 

Walter Jung. This book provides an ex* 
cellent introduction to the field of IC- 
timers and their applications for anyone 
Involved in modern solid-state elec- 
tronics—from hobbyist, to technical and 
engineering student, to practicing techni- 
cian or engineer. Not only does it contain 
many practical and useful circultSt it is 
also a valuable reference of basic 
theoretical information. $9.95.* 

• ADVANCED BASIC— Applications and 

Problems— BK10OT— by James Coan \s 
for those who want to extend their exper- 
tise with BASIC. Offers advanced tech- 
niques and applications. $7,95/ 



Use the order card In the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mall to: 

73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458. Be sure to include check or detailed credit card information, 

* Add $1.00 handling charge for orders under $10.00. Note: Prices subject to change on books not published by 73 Magazine. 



CALL us TOLL FREE 1-(8001 258-5473 



H^^G-A* 



^B V^k Kq^J^^^^^^^^^^H^ amateur 










Ol^ 



DVintage^l9frO thru 1965 
D Mid-years^ 1966 thru 1971 
D Nearly New^l972 thru 1977 

*pre-l978 issues. 



[7 

I DJUNE 63 

DaUG 63 

DOCT €3 

OFEB 64 

a MAY 67 

I a JULY 67 
DOCT 67 
n JUNE %% 
QiULY 6S 
OSEPT 68 
a JAN 69 
OfEB 69 
DMAR 69 
QaPR 69 
OmaY 69 
D JUNE 69 
QJULY 60 
DaUG 69 
O SEPT 69 
noCT 69 
a NOV 69 
n DEO 69 
D J A N 70 
OFEB 70 
□ MAR 70 
OaPR 70 



□ may 70 
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a J AN 71 

□ FEB 71 
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□ may 71 
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□ SEPT 71 
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DQCT 73 




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PDEC 73 

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□ JAN 76 

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□ mar 76 
UMAY 76 

□ JUNE 76 
OJULY 16 
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□ sept 76 
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D NOV 76 
□DEC 76 

□ holiday 76 



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222 



t 



PROPAGATION WIZARD'S 

HANDBOOK 

You read his forecast in T$- 
now discover his methods! 



when sunspots riddled the world-wide communications 
networks of the 1940% John Henry Nelson looked to the 
planets for an answer. 



Dubbed 'The Father o* 
Celestial Electronic^' by one 
scientist |ohn believed that 
certain planetary alignments 
lirecede variations in sun- 
spot numbers^ eventually 
devising a system that re- 
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The 



Challenge 

of I60! 



Ttred of talkl ng to the aame characters on ?S every evening? Perhaps It's time 
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Ttie "Top Band" Is different ffOfn any other amateur alloaatiOfi. lis propaga- 
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magazine 

PETERBOROUGH NH 03458 





Magazine's 
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magazine 

PETERBOROUGH NH 03458 




224 



Revised Repeater Atlas 
of the entire worll 



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(See page 21 6 for detailed description of this BA R GAIN J 

Use order card in the back of this maffazine or itemize your 
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73 Magazine • Peterborough NH 03458 



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225 



IS HARD COPY STORAGE A PROBLEM?. 




9- 



73, as thick as U Is, fs more like a floppy when it comes 
to standing on the bookshelf. Try the 73 Library Shelf 
Boxes, , . , sturdy corrugated white dirt resistant card- 
board boxes which will keep them from flopping around. 
We have self-sticking labels for the boxes, too, not only 
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RaiiiO, Personal Computing, Radio Electronics, inter- 
face Age, and Byte. Ask for whatever stickers you want 
with your box order. They hold a full year of 73 , . . or 
Kilobaud. Your magazine library Is your prime reference, 
keep it handy and keep It neat with these strong library 
shelf boxes . . . One box is S2,00, 2 boxes are $3.00 and 
eight boxes are S10;00. Be sure to specify which labels 
we should send. Have your credit card handy and call 
ouf toll-free order number 800-250-5473, or use the order 
card in the back of the magazine and mail to; 

73 LIBRARY SHELF BOXES Peterborough, NH 03458 



For a little bit extra 
YOU CAN go first class / 

.... And binders for your 73 Magazines are the 
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Your back issues uf 73 are youi very best encyclopedia of 
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last year? Get a binder . . . only $6.50 in red with gold lettering 
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either way. . . 

you can save from $50 

to $500 with a Henry Radio 



antenna paclcage 



A 



Special 

packages with 
special savings... 



Package No. 1 

Swan TB-2A 

Tristao MM-40 or Triex SM-40 

CDR CD-44 

RG-58 too* 

Control Cable 100' 

Retail Price: approximately 
Package Price: 




or design-it- 
yourself...and 
youUI still save 



$620 
S525 



Package No. 2 

Swan TB-3HA 

Tristao MM-40 or Triex SM-40 

CDR Ham- 1 I 

RG-8 100^ 

Control Cable 100' 

Retail Price: approximately $750 

Package Price: $640 

Package No. 3 

Swan TB-3HA 

Tristao CZ-454 FS or Triex W-51 

5' mast 
CDR Ham- 1 I 
RG-8 100' 
Control Cable 100* 

Retail Price: approximately $1300 

Package Price: $1095 

Package No, 4 

Swan TB-4HA or Cushcraft ATB'34 

Tristao CZ-454 FS or Triex W-51 
5' mast 
CDR Ham-11 
RG-8 100^ 
Control Cable 100' 

Retail Price: approximately $1360 
Package Price : $ 1 1 40 




For many years Henry Radio has been 
providing a beam-antenna package 
program for amateurs who wanted an 
efficient but economical package. 
Thousands have benefited from this 
offer in the past. In recent years we 
have offered the customer the versatil- 
ity of designing their own system with 
the components that they want. Our 
only requirement is the purchase of at 
least: 

1 Antenna 

1 Rotator 
1 Tower 

100* Rotator Cable 
100^ Coax Cable 

We sell merchandise from the followmg 
manufacturers and our packages can include 
their products* 

Swan Antennas 

Cushcraft Antennas 

HyGain Antennas (when available) 

Mosley Antennas (when available) 

Wilson Antennas 

KLM Antennas 

Mini Products Antennas 

CDR Rotators 

Tristao Towers 

Triex Towers 

Rohn Towers 

Accessories of All Kinds 

Send us a note telling us what your choice is 
and we'll send y^^ <^^^ '^^^ package price. 

Wry buy from Heriry Radiol 

Owr 50 years experience. No f/nance charges if paid wnhtn 90 
days. Low interest contracts - 3%/yr Add on {14% ^rtrfuat rate} • 
3^ long as 24 months. 10% down or tt^de-in down payments. 
Good used equipment. Most m^kes and models. Used equipment 
carries a 15 day triaf, 90 day warranty and may be traded back 
Within 90 days for full credit toy^rds the purchase of NEW 
equipment. Write for i/tef^ture. 



Km mmii 



11240 W Olympic Blvd.. Los Angeles. Calif, 90064 213/477-6701 

931 H Euclid. Anaheim. Calif 92801 7147772-9200 

5Jt Butler. Missouri 64730 816/679-3127 



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■ 11% 



STILL THE SAME FINE, TIME PROVEN RIG. BUT NOW WITH THE SIMPLE ADDITION 
OF A PLUG-IN CRYSTAL. THE TS-rOOSP'WILL BE ABLE TO UTILIZE THE NEW 
REPEATER SUBBAND (144.5 TO 145.5 MHZ). STILL FEATURES ALL OF THE FINE 
ATTRIBUTES OF THE TS-700S: A DIGITAL FREQUENCY DISPLAY, RECEIVER PRE- 
AMP, VOX, SEMI-BREAK IN, AND CW SIDETONE. OF COURSE, IT'S ALL MODE, 144- 
148 MHZ, VFO CONTROLLED., .AND KENWOOD QUALITY THROUGHOUT 



TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS INC. 1111 WEST WALNUT/COMPTON. CA 90220 



^KENV\/OOD